Modern Languages and Literatures

The study of modern foreign languages, as well as cultures and literatures in their original languages, is an intellectual experience that offers students another point of view on life. Knowledge of a language other than English frees students from the restraints of seeing but one reality, and the new perspectives gained from understanding the expression of another people are the essence of a liberal education.

The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures stresses proficiency in all language skills to prepare students for careers in business, communication, education, government, health sciences, social work, and related professions.

The department offers instruction in the following languages: Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. Currently, majors and minors are available in French, German, Italian, and Spanish, and an individually-designed major is possible in Chinese.

In addition to its own programs, the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures participates in the International Studies program and the minor programs in Asian Studies, Communication Media Studies, Educational Studies, Health Studies, Italian Studies, Judaic Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Russian, East European, and Central Asian Studies, Peace and Justice Studies, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Additionally, many of our courses fulfil the Magis Core Signature Elements.

Selected language courses may count toward those programs. A limited number of courses taught in English may count toward specific majors and minors. Courses offered by other departments may count as well. Please consult the individual directors of the French, German, Italian and Spanish sections for a list of any relevant courses from outside the department not already listed in this section of the Catalog.

Modern Languages and Literatures courses requiring a prerequisite may allow students with suitable life or academic experience from other institutions to be admitted by permission of the instructor. Students who believe they have appropriate background experience may petition the professor for admission to desired courses.

Note: Education minors need a minimum of 30 credits in the language area, of which at least three credits must be in literature and three in culture/civilization.

Language Core Requirements

The core language requirements for the Class 2022 and earlier may be fulfilled by successfully completing two semesters at the intermediate level of any language listed among the offerings of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures. Students should see the specific requirements for the Dolan School of Business, Egan School of Nursing and Health Studies, and School of Engineering.

Starting with the Class of 2023, please refer to the Magis Core curriculum, which states that at least one semester of a foreign language must be taken at Fairfield University by all students, complemented by either a second language course in the same language or a second math course. Note that students must first complete a language placement exam, if applicable, in order to continue in the same language that was studied previously.

Core Mission Statement

The study of languages is a key element in working and learning across cultures and geographical boundaries. Language in the Core Curriculum focuses on the acquisition of the skills of reading, listening, speaking, and writing, though the emphasis varies according to the chosen language. Students in core language study acquire knowledge about other cultures, literatures, and historical periods. It is expected that students will use the skills and knowledge acquired in language courses in practical and intellectual pursuits.

Through their study of foreign languages, students will:

  • Be able to read a passage of moderate difficulty in their chosen language and be able to communicate with a native speaker.
  • Learn grammatical and syntactical rules which will facilitate oral and written expression in the language.
  • Become acquainted with the life, customs, and cultural traditions where the language is spoken.

Arabic

ARBC 1110 Elementary Modern Standard Arabic I    3 Credits

The first course, the first of a two-semester sequence, teaches the essentials of phonology, script, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the standard means of communicating in the Arab world. Teaching is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the courses are aimed at placing student learners in the context of the native-speaking environment. Previously AR 0110.

ARBC 1111 Elementary Modern Standard Arabic II    3 Credits

Prerequisite: ARBC 1110.

A continuation of ARBC 1110, this course teaches the essentials of phonology, script, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the standard means of communicating in the Arab world. Teaching is proficiency-based, implying that all activities within the courses are aimed at placing student learners in the context of the native-speaking environment. Previously AR 0111.

ARBC 2210 Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I    3 Credits

Prerequisite: ARBC 1111.

This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, continues to build upon the skills acquired in the first-year course. Emphasis will be placed upon improving grammar, listening comprehension, and speaking and reading skills. Students will gain confidence in conversing with native speakers on a variety of topics, will be able to write more complex texts on everyday themes, and will acquire the skills to read uncomplicated authentic texts, such as newspaper articles on familiar topics. Previously AR 0210.

ARBC 2211 Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II    3 Credits

Prerequisite: ARBC 2210.

A continuation of ARBC 2210, this course continues to build upon the skills acquired in the first-year course. Emphasis will be placed upon improving grammar, listening comprehension, and speaking and reading skills. Students will gain confidence in conversing with native speakers on a variety of topics, will be able to write more complex texts on everyday themes, and will acquire the skills to read uncomplicated authentic texts, such as newspaper articles on familiar topics. Previously AR 0211.

ARBC 3990 Independent Study    3 Credits

Students undertake readings and studies in a specialized area of Arabic language and culture, under the direction of a staff member. Designed to fill the special needs of specific students, this course is offered at the discretion of the department chair. Enrollment by permission only. Previously AR 0381-0382.

Chinese

CHIN 1110 Elementary Chinese I    3 Credits

Attributes: ANMC Asian Studies Elective

Designed for students with no prior experience with Chinese or whose placement scores are in the range for this course level. This course, the first of a two-semester sequence, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously CI 0110.

CHIN 1111 Elementary Chinese II    3 Credits

Attributes: ANMC Asian Studies Elective

Prerequisite: CHIN 1110.

This course, a continuation of CHIN 1110, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously CI 0111.

CHIN 2210 Intermediate Chinese I    3 Credits

Attributes: ANMC Asian Studies Elective

Prerequisite: CHIN 1111.

This course, the first of a two-semester sequence, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. The language cultures are explored through a wide variety of materials (literary texts, press articles, films, etc). Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously CI 0210.

CHIN 2211 Intermediate Chinese II    3 Credits

Attributes: ANMC Asian Studies Elective

Prerequisite: CHIN 2210.

This course, a continuation of CHIN 2210, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. The language cultures are explored through a wide variety of materials (literary texts, press articles, films, etc.). Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously CI 0211.

CHIN 2220 Advanced Chinese    3 Credits

Attributes: ANMC Asian Studies Elective

Prerequisite: CHIN 2211.

This course will continue to build on work completed through the intermediate level Chinese. All four skills: reading, listening, reading, and writing, will be further strengthened, but with emphasis on consolidating conversational skills and improving reading confidence. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to use integrated skills and cultural strategies to speak with some fluency on everyday conversational topics, read lengthier and more complex materials, write short but accurate compositions on computers using Chinese software, and develop a more sophisticated sense about the language and the culture. Previously CI 0220.

CHIN 2221 Reading China    3 Credits

Attributes: ANMC Asian Studies Elective, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: CHIN 2211.

This course has the twin goals of increasing reading proficiency in Chinese language and exploring Chinese culture. Topics are selected from four main areas: Chinese Geography (e.g. city, countryside, landscape), Chinese Life (e.g. festivals, popular culture, everyday living), Chinese Society (e.g. family, social problems, internet use), and Chinese History and Thought (e.g. history, literature, myth, and philosophy). Students also learn how to use different resources and online tools to read and research China-related subjects on their own. Required readings and assignments are in Chinese. Previously CI 0221.

CHIN 2250 Modern China Through Fiction and Film    3 Credits

Attributes: ANMC Asian Studies Elective, MELT Magis Core Exploration: Literature, WDIV World Diversity

This course is a study of various cultural aspects of modern China in the 20th century through reading translated fiction as well as films. Students explore topics such as modernity, nationalism, individualism, gender, and cultural identity in the modern cultural-historical context. Also will be discussed are issues particular to fiction and film as representational modes: How do fiction and film narrate history and the complex Chinese experience? How have they both been shaped by and contributed to the socio-cultural transformations? And how do they represent the increasingly diversified cultural and social landscape of contemporary China? Crosslisted with ENGL 1180. Previously CI 0250.

CHIN 3990 Independent Study    3 Credits

Students undertake readings and studies in a specialized area of Chinese under the direction of a staff member. Designed to fill the special needs of specific students, this course is offered at the discretion of the department chair. Enrollment by permission only. Previously CI 0381-0382.

French

FREN 1110 Elementary French I    3 Credits

Designed for students with no prior experience with French or whose placement scores are in the range for this course level. This course, the first of a two-semester sequence, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously FR 0110.

FREN 1111 Elementary French II    3 Credits

Prerequisite: FREN 1110.

This course, a continuation of FREN 1110, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously FR 0111.

FREN 2210 Intermediate French I    3 Credits

Attributes: MWAC Magis Core: Writing Across Curriculum

Prerequisite: FREN 1111.

This course, the first of a two-semester sequence, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. The language cultures are explored through a wide variety of materials (literary texts, press articles, films, etc). Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously FR 0210.

FREN 2211 Intermediate French II    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective

Prerequisite: FREN 2210.

This course, a continuation of FREN 2210, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. The language cultures are explored through a wide variety of materials (literary texts, press articles, films, etc). Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously FR 0211.

FREN 2219 French Syntax and Expression    3 Credits

Prerequisite: FREN 2211.

This course provides a rigorous review of French grammar and syntax and examines the critical differences between English and French. The goals of this course are to prepare students for further advanced courses, and to use French more accurately by practicing the specifics of grammar and syntax. Furthermore, the students will examine and use the French language in varying levels of discourse and registers, ranging from everyday speech to short narratives. To achieve these goals, we will examine contemporary, historical and literary readings, which contain the grammar and syntax under study and insure that they are studied in context. Previously FR 0219.

FREN 2220 Topics in Language and Culture    3 Credits

Prerequisite: FREN 2211.

This course improves proficiency in written and oral expression by focusing on topics in French language and culture. Students develop advanced writing and speaking skills while concentrating on grammar, style, and appropriateness. Weekly compositions, based primarily on the genres or topics studied allow students to identify and correct grammatical mistakes. Students present research in class in French. Films and various cultural artifacts (proverbs, songs, historical materials) familiarize students with idiomatic French. Previously FR 0220.

FREN 3251 Culture and Civilization of France and the Francophone World I    3 Credits

Prerequisite: FREN 2211.

This course explores France and French-speaking people in a cultural, social, and historical context. Students use multimedia, Internet, and audio-visual resources extensively and submit frequent oral and written reports. Previously FR 0251.

FREN 3252 Culture and Civilization of France and the Francophone World II    3 Credits

Attributes: WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: FREN 2211.

This course explores the regions and people that comprise the francophone world in a cultural, social, and historical context. Students use multimedia, Internet, and audio-visual resources extensively and submit frequent oral and written reports. Previously FR 0252.

FREN 3265 French Translation Workshop    3 Credits

Prerequisite: FREN 2219 or FREN 2220.

In this course, students develop expertise in the art and craft of translation. The course presents terminology, advanced grammar analysis, and procedures that assist the translator in describing and solving translation problems. It uses real and simulated case studies in a variety of fields including commercial correspondence, tourism, food, transportation, telecommunications, social science, and literature. Students practice with native script, giving attention to individual interests and majors, using French-to-English and English-to-French translations. The class, which is conducted in both languages, uses human, computer-based, and print resources. Previously FR 0265.

FREN 3267 French Commercial Culture    3 Credits

Prerequisite: FREN 2219 or FREN 2220.

This introduction to the business practices and economic situation of France in the context of the European Union emphasizes commercial vocabulary and business situations presented through extensive use of authentic material and documents. This course, which is of particular interest to students seeking a career in international business or international affairs, uses multimedia, Internet, and audio-visual resources extensively, and includes regular practice in speaking and writing. Previously FR 0267.

FREN 3271 Contemporary French Press and Media    3 Credits

Prerequisite: FREN 2219 or FREN 2220.

Students read and discuss articles from representative magazines and newspapers in French, as well as reports from television news broadcasts and the Internet. The course considers how the media and technology are shaping French society in the 21st century and discusses a wide range of topics such as politics, education, religion, the arts, science, privacy, and censorship. Students complete frequent oral and written reports. Previously FR 0271.

FREN 3980 Internship    3 Credits

Prerequisite: FREN 2219 or FREN 2220.

The internship program gives students first-hand experience in the fields of translation, interpretation, cataloging, public relations, advertising, teaching, etc., in the language of their specialization. Department members, who agree to guide the endeavor, supervise student work. When required by a faculty supervisor, an evaluation of student interns may be required from the institution where students work. The student's work should demand no less than one full day per week, or its equivalent. Previously FR 0377-0378.

FREN 3990 Independent Study    3 Credits

Prerequisite: FREN 2219 or FREN 2220.

Students undertake readings and studies in a specialized area of French, under the direction of a member of faculty. Designed to fill the special needs of specific students, this course is offered at the discretion of the department chair. Enrollment by permission only. Previously FR 0381-0382.

FREN 4301 Survey of Literature in French I    3 Credits

Prerequisite: FREN 2219 or FREN 2220.

This course presents a chronological view of French literature, emphasizing the most important writers and major literary movements and themes. Students will consider varied genres from the Middle Ages through the 17th century. Previously FR 0301.

FREN 4302 Survey of Literature in French II    3 Credits

Prerequisite: FREN 2219 or FREN 2220.

This course presents a chronological view of French literature, emphasizing the most important writers and major literary movements and themes. Students will study the forces unleashed by the Revolution and considers the development of modern French literature. Previously FR 0302.

FREN 4305 French and Francophone Women Writers    3 Credits

Attributes: WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

Prerequisite: FREN 2219 or FREN 2220.

The course explores a wide range of literary genres produced by women writers from France and the francophone world, investigating women's issues such as race, gender, class, status, and power within the historical, political, and cultural contexts of their regions of origin. The course introduces French feminist theories. Students read and conduct discussions in French and complete frequent oral and written assignments. Previously FR 0305.

FREN 4366 Film and Literature in French    3 Credits

Prerequisite: FREN 2219 or FREN 2220.

This course examines the relationship between film and literature. Students view the film version of each work, which serves as a basis for class discussion. The course requires frequent oral and written works. Previously FR 0366.

FREN 4999 Capstone Seminar    3 Credits

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Majors in French participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in the spring of their senior year. The focus of this seminar varies according to the professor, but possible topics include European Film, The Grand Tour, Immigration in Europe, Capital Cities, Language Teaching and Technology, Europe and America. Students research their capstone papers in the target language and present the final work in English and French. The instructor may, in some cases, evaluate work in the target language in consultation with colleagues in that area of expertise in the department. Seminar is conducted in English. Previously FR 0399.

German

GRMN 1110 Elementary German I    3 Credits

Designed for students with no prior experience with German or whose placement scores are in the range for this course level. This course, the first of a two-semester sequence, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously GM 0110.

GRMN 1111 Elementary German II    3 Credits

Prerequisite: GRMN 1110.

This course, a continuation of GRMN 1110, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously GM 0111.

GRMN 2210 Intermediate German I    3 Credits

Prerequisite: GRMN 1111.

This course, the first of a two-semester sequence, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. The language cultures are explored through a wide variety of materials (literary texts, press articles, films, etc). Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously GM 0210.

GRMN 2211 Intermediate German II    3 Credits

Prerequisite: GRMN 2210.

This course, a continuation of GRMN 2210, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. The language cultures are explored through a wide variety of materials (literary texts, press articles, films, etc). Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously GM 0211.

GRMN 2220 Topics in Language and Culture    3 Credits

Prerequisite: GRMN 2211.

This course improves proficiency in written and oral expression by focusing on particular topics in German language and culture. Students develop advanced writing and speaking skills while concentrating on grammar, style, and appropriateness. Weekly compositions, based primarily on the genres studies (short story, theater, memoir, essay) allow students to identify and correct grammatical mistakes. Students present speeches in class and conduct situational dramas such as job interviews, television reporting, courtroom trials, debates in German. Films and various cultural artifacts (comic strips, proverbs, songs) familiarize students with idiomatic German. Previously GM 0220.

GRMN 3241 German Cinema    3 Credits

Prerequisite: GRMN 2211.

German filmmakers are known for their artistic expression and reaction to social and political trends that concern the country and its citizens. This course deals with major developments of German cinema throughout the twentieth century and will give students an overview of major movements, important directors, genres, and actors in the history of German film, as well as socio-political matters facing Weimar and Nazi Germany, post-war West and East German states, and unified Germany. Students will be introduced to the tools of film analysis, cinematic codes, and techniques such as narration, mise-en-scène, cinematography, sound, editing, and how these affect the viewer. Previously GM 0241.

GRMN 3251 German Civilization and Culture I    3 Credits

Prerequisite: GRMN 2211.

This course examines the main currents of German culture and civilization through lectures, films, the Internet, and literary and cultural readings. Students complete frequent oral and written reports. Conducted in German, this course requires frequent oral and written reports. Previously GM 0251.

GRMN 3252 German Civilization and Culture II    3 Credits

Prerequisite: GRMN 2211.

This course examines German immigration, especially to the United States, considering in-depth the German-American experience through lectures, films, the Internet, and literary and cultural readings. Conducted in English, this course requires frequent oral and written reports. Previously GM 0252.

GRMN 3262 Survey of German Literature    3 Credits

This course offers an overview of German works and literary movements from the Middle Ages to 1945, providing students with the fundamentals of literary analysis in the genres of poetry, drama, novellas, novels, short stories, and film. The course requires frequent oral and written reports. Previously GM 0262.

GRMN 3980 Internship    3 Credits

The internship program gives students first-hand experience in the fields of translation, interpretation, cataloging, public relations, advertising, teaching, etc., in the language of their specialization. Department members, who agree to guide the endeavor, supervise student work. When required by a faculty supervisor, an evaluation of student interns may be required from the institution where students work. The student's work should demand no less than one full day per week, or its equivalent. Previously GM 0377-0378.

GRMN 3990 Independent Study    3 Credits

Students undertake readings and studies in a specialized area of German under the direction of a staff member. Designed to fill the special needs of specific students, this course is offered at the discretion of the department chair. Enrollment by permission only. Previously GM 0381-0382.

GRMN 4999 Capstone Seminar    3 Credits

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Majors in German participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in the spring of their senior year. The focus of this seminar varies according to the professor, but possible topics include European Film, the Grand Tour, Immigration in Europe, Capital Cities, Language Teaching and Technology, Europe and America. Students research their capstone papers in the target language and present the final work in English and German. The instructor may, in some cases, evaluate work in the target language in consultation with colleagues in the area of expertise in the department. Seminar is conducted in English. Previously GM 0399.

Hebrew

HEBR 1110 Elementary Hebrew I    3 Credits

Attributes: JST Judaic Studies Minor

Designed for students with no prior experience with Hebrew or whose placement scores are in the range for this course level. This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously HE 0110.

HEBR 1111 Elementary Hebrew II    3 Credits

Attributes: JST Judaic Studies Minor

Prerequisite: HEBR 1110.

This course, a continuation of HEBR 1110, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously HE 0111.

HEBR 2210 Intermediate Hebrew I    3 Credits

Attributes: JST Judaic Studies Minor

Prerequisite: HEBR 1111.

This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. The language cultures are explored through a wide variety of materials (literary texts, press articles, films, etc.). Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously HE 0210.

HEBR 2211 Intermediate Hebrew II    3 Credits

Attributes: JST Judaic Studies Minor

Prerequisite: HEBR 2210.

This course, a continuation of HEBR 2210, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. The language cultures are explored through a wide variety of materials (literary texts, press articles, films, etc.). Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously HE 0211.

Italian

ITLN 1110 Elementary Italian I    3 Credits

Designed for students with no prior experience with Italian or whose placement scores are in the range for this course level. This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The culture of Italy is explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously IT 0110.

ITLN 1111 Elementary Italian II    3 Credits

Prerequisite: ITLN 1110.

This course, a continuation of ITLN 1110, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The culture of Italy is explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously IT 0111.

ITLN 2210 Intermediate Italian I    3 Credits

Prerequisite: ITLN 1111.

This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. Italian culture is explored through a wide variety of materials including literary texts, press articles, and films. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously IT 0210.

ITLN 2211 Intermediate Italian II    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIT Italian Studies: Italian

Prerequisite: ITLN 2210.

This course, a continuation of ITLN 2210, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. Italian culture is explored through a wide variety of materials including literary texts, press articles, and films. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously IT 0211.

ITLN 2271 Italian Cinema    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused, ISIT Italian Studies: Italian, ITEN Italian Course Taught in English, VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

This survey of Italian films as textual, cultural, and historical artifacts analyzes movements such as neorealism, commedia all'italiana, the spaghetti western, and new Italian cinema through the works of selected directors. The course follows a chronology from the silent period to present day, with special emphasis on the "golden ages" of Italian cinema, neo-realism of the postwar period, the 1960s' comedy of manners, and the new Italian cinema of the 1980s and 1990s. Students analyze the works of Rossellini, De Sica, Fellini, Visconti, Germi, Antonioni, Wertmüller, Leone, Pasolini, Moretti, Benigni, and others. Crosslisted with FTMA 2271. Previously IT 0271.

ITLN 2289 Dante    3 Credits

Attributes: CAOT Catholic Studies: Non-Religious Studies, E_AF English Literature After 1800, ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused, ISIT Italian Studies: Italian, MELT Magis Core Exploration: Literature

This course examines the works of Dante Alighieri, including the Vita nuova, in addition to the "Inferno," "Purgatorio," and "Paradiso" from the Divine Comedy. Students are introduced to the political, linguistic, theological, and poetic ideas that make Dante's works not only significant in the medieval context, but also continue to challenge and inform modern debates. This course, which is conducted in English, counts towards the core requirement in literature. Crosslisted with ENGL 1150. Previously IT 0289, ITLN 3289.

ITLN 2290 Italian American Cinema    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused, ISIT Italian Studies: Italian, ITEN Italian Course Taught in English, VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

This course investigates salient aspects of Italian American cinema, including the representation of Italian Americans, works directed by Italian American directors, and roles played by Italian American actors. It also examines the difference in roles and representation for men and women in this subgroup of American society, with particular consideration given to the ethnic roots of these differences. Throughout the semester we will examine the ways in which film displays Italian ethnicity in the United States. The course also analyzes the profound influence of Italian cinema on the film-making of Italian American screenwriters and directors. This class is taught in English. Crosslisted with FTMA 2290. Previously IT 0290, ITLN 3290.

ITLN 3219 Italian for Professional Applications    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused, ISIT Italian Studies: Italian

Prerequisite: ITLN 2211.

This is a language course designed to give students who have completed Intermediate Italian the grammatical, lexical, and cultural literacy to engage in professional transactions in Italian. Students will gain a cross-cultural understanding of business communication in Italian through the introduction and refinement of pertinent grammar and vocabulary. As a class, we will research notable Italian industries, including fashion, food, and tourism, and analyze their commercial appeal in Italy and abroad. Students will also become familiar with Italy's political, industrial, and financial institutions, while keeping abreast of current events that affect Italian commerce. Previously IT 0219.

ITLN 3220 Topics in Language and Culture    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused

Prerequisite: ITLN 2211.

This course improves proficiency in written and oral expression by focusing on particular topics in Italian language and culture. Students develop advanced writing and speaking skills while concentrating on grammar, style, and appropriateness. Weekly compositions, based primarily on the genres studied (short story, theater, memoir, essay) allow students to identify and correct grammatical mistakes. Students present speeches in class and conduct situational dramas such as job interviews, television reporting, courtroom trials, and debates in Italian. Films and various cultural artifacts (comic strips, proverbs, songs) familiarize students with idiomatic Italian. Previously IT 0220.

ITLN 3222 Made in Italy    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused, ISIT Italian Studies: Italian

Prerequisite: ITLN 2211.

Made in Italy, a term that indicates the uniqueness of Italy in abbigliamento (clothing), agroalimentare (food), arredamento (furniture) and automobili (automobiles), dates to the 1980s. This course seeks to further our understanding of Italian culture by investigating the reasons for the popularity and preeminence of products made in Italy. Designers have ensured Italy's prominence in the world of fashion. Pasta, prosciutto, and olive oil are synonymous with Italy, the birthplace of the Slow Food movement. Innovative design, both interior and exterior, is another hallmark of Italian excellence. Italy has produced both high performing, luxury cars and more economical modes of transportation. Conducted in Italian. Previously IT 0222.

ITLN 3233 Creative Writing in Italian    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused, ISIT Italian Studies: Italian

Prerequisite: ITLN 2211.

This course will explore the craft of fiction, touching on both its theory and practice. Students will begin by examining some masters of prose in order to discuss key elements of fiction writing (plot, character, point of view, and style). They will consider the panorama of modern and contemporary Italian fiction, from the novella to the historical novel, coming-of-age fiction to the postmodern immigrant narrative. Students will develop individual creative projects, which will be shared with their workshop classmates and revised in cooperation with the instructor. Previously IT 0233.

ITLN 3240 Language of Food in Italian Culture    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused, ISIT Italian Studies: Italian

Prerequisite: ITLN 2211.

"Dimmi ciò che mangi e ti dirò chi sei… Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are." Perhaps more than any other modern nation, Italy is defined by and celebrated for its food. Exports such as vino, pizza, and gelato, so quintessentially Italian, are now readily available across the globe. But what does food mean to Italians, and how does it reflect, magnify, and shape their collective identity? In this course, students will explore references to food and gastronomy in Italian literature, television, cinema, and art. We will investigate how Italians past and present have used food to talk about mechanisms of social belonging, disparity, and alienation. Beginning with today’s celebrity chefs and moving back to Dante and the origins of Italian literature, we will learn about the historical forces that influenced Italy’s evolving culinary traditions while honing our Italian language skills. Previously IT 0240.

ITLN 3253 Contemporary Italian Culture    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused, ISIT Italian Studies: Italian

Prerequisite: ITLN 2211.

This course examines aspects of contemporary Italian culture in the arts, film, music, media, and literature. Students analyze the debates that inform the political, social, and cultural dimensions of Italian society today. Readings include magazine and newspaper articles, print advertisements, novels, short stories, and comic books. Students view television news reports, soap operas, commercials, and movies, and listen to various types of contemporary Italian music. The course is conducted in Italian. Previously IT 0253.

ITLN 3255 The Novella    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused

Prerequisite: ITLN 2211.

This course analyzes the most successful genre in Italian literature, the novella (short story), as it evolved from the medieval era through the Renaissance to present day. Students read selections from Boccaccio, Basile, Bandello, Verga, Pirandello, Deledda, Morante, Moravia, Calvino, and others. The course is conducted in Italian. Previously IT 0255.

ITLN 3257 Theatre in Italy: Comedy    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused

Prerequisite: ITLN 2211.

From the erudite satires of the humanists to the political farces of contemporary playwrights, Italian comedy has always done more than just entertain. In this course we will study dramatic works by some of Italy's most prominent authors (Machiavelli, Aretino, Goldoni, Pirandello, et al.) and explore the development of comic theater in Italy from the Renaissance to the present. We will weigh the social function of humor in Italian theater, along with issues relating to gender, power, and performance. We will focus on the literary and historical dimensions of these texts, but also use these lively comedies to hone our reading, writing, and oral skills in Italian. To that end, we will watch clips of the plays, regularly perform scenes together in class, and even experiment with improvised "commedia dell'arte" scenarios. Previously IT 0257.

ITLN 3980 Internship    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused

The internship program gives students first-hand experience in the fields of translation, interpretation, cataloging, public relations, advertising and teaching in the language of their specialization. Department members, who agree to guide the endeavor, supervise student work. When required by a faculty supervisor, an evaluation of student interns may be required from the institution where students work. The student's work should demand no less than one full day per week, or its equivalent. Previously IT 0377-0378.

ITLN 3990 Independent Study    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused, ISIT Italian Studies: Italian

Students undertake readings and studies in a specialized area of Italian, under the direction of a staff member. Designed to fill the special needs of specific students, this course is offered at the discretion of the department chair. Enrollment by permission only. Previously IT 0381-0382.

ITLN 4330 Redefining the Cosmos: Voyages    3 Credits

Attributes: ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused

Prerequisite: ITLN 2211.

The Italian Renaissance has traditionally been understood as the very laboratory of Modernity. In a time where new and revolutionary ideas about art, politics and science took shape, Europe faced an extraordinary challenge: how to integrate into "the Renaissance experiment" the new natural and human experience that opened up with the discovery of the New World. Italy produced an extraordinarily heterogeneous body of work that stemmed from these voyages: that is, a "literature of discovery." This course will explore this literature, which includes epic poems, popular cantari, travelogues, historical and geographical treatises, as well as epistolary collections. Previously IT 0330.

ITLN 4999 Capstone Seminar    3 Credits

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Majors in Italian participate in an interdisciplinary seminar in the spring of their senior year. The focus of this seminar varies according to the professor, but possible topics include European Film, The Grand Tour, Immigration in Europe, Capital Cities, Language Teaching and Technology, Europe and America. Students research their capstone papers in the target language and present the final work in English and Italian. The instructor may, in some cases, evaluate work in the target language in consultation with colleagues in the area of expertise in the department. Seminar is conducted in English. Previously IT 0399.

Portuguese

PORT 1110 Elementary Brazilian Portuguese I    3 Credits

Designed for students with no prior experience with Portuguese or whose placement scores are in the range for this course level. This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, is designed to present the student with the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultures are explored through a variety of media. The course will broaden the students' understanding of the cultures of the different countries where Portuguese is spoken, especially Brazil. Previously PG 0110.

PORT 1111 Elementary Brazilian Portuguese II    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective

Prerequisite: PORT 1110.

This course, a continuation of PORT 1110, is designed to present the student with the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultures are explored through a variety of media. The course will broaden the students' understanding of the cultures of the different countries where Portuguese is spoken, especially Brazil. Previously PG 0111.

PORT 2210 Intermediate Brazilian Portuguese I    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective

Prerequisite: PORT 1111.

This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, continues to build upon the skills acquired in the first-year sequence. The course focuses on increasing the development of communication and comprehension skills while exploring in more depth the complexity of the Brazilian Portuguese language. Emphasis is placed on the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, as well as the development of cultural literacy. Cultural emphasis is placed on both Brazil and the Lusophone world. Previously PG 0210.

PORT 2211 Intermediate Brazilian Portuguese II    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective

Prerequisite: PORT 2210.

This course, a continuation of PORT 2210, continues to build upon the skills acquired in the first-year sequence. The course focuses on increasing the development of communication and comprehension skills while exploring in more depth the complexity of the Brazilian Portuguese language. Emphasis is placed on the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, as well as the development of cultural literacy. Cultural emphasis is placed on both Brazil and the Lusophone world. Previously PG 0211.

Russian

RUSN 1110 Elementary Russian I    3 Credits

Attributes: RECS Russian, Eastern European, and Central Asian Studies

Designed for students with no prior experience with Russian or whose placement scores are in the range for this course level. This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously RU 0110.

RUSN 1111 Elementary Russian II    3 Credits

Attributes: RECS Russian, Eastern European, and Central Asian Studies

Prerequisite: RUSN 1110.

This course, a continuation of RUSN 1110, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously RU 0111.

RUSN 2210 Intermediate Russian I    3 Credits

Attributes: RECS Russian, Eastern European, and Central Asian Studies

Prerequisite: RUSN 1111.

This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. The language cultures are explored through a wide variety of materials (literary texts, press articles, films, etc). Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously RU 0210.

RUSN 2211 Intermediate Russian II    3 Credits

Attributes: RECS Russian, Eastern European, and Central Asian Studies

Prerequisite: RUSN 2210.

This course, a continuation of RUSN 2210, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. The language cultures are explored through a wide variety of materials (literary texts, press articles, films, etc). Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously RU 0211.

Spanish

SPAN 1110 Elementary Spanish I    3 Credits

Designed for students with no prior experience with Spanish or whose placement scores are in the range for this course level. This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously SP 0110.

SPAN 1111 Elementary Spanish II    3 Credits

Prerequisite: SPAN 1110.

This course, a continuation of SPAN 1110, teaches the essentials of pronunciation, structure, and usage, allowing students to acquire the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language cultures are explored through a variety of media. Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously SP 0111.

SPAN 2210 Intermediate Spanish I    3 Credits

Prerequisite: SPAN 1111.

This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. The language cultures are explored through a wide variety of materials (literary texts, press articles, films, etc). Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously SP 0210.

SPAN 2211 Intermediate Spanish II    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective

Prerequisite: SPAN 2210.

This course, a continuation of SPAN 2210, prepares students to continue the study of language on a more advanced level, and includes review of essential points of grammar, vocabulary building, and regular practice in speaking and writing. The language cultures are explored through a wide variety of materials (literary texts, press articles, films, etc). Students attend three classes per week and do mandatory online work determined by the instructor. Previously SP 0211.

SPAN 2220 Topics in Language and Culture    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective, MWAC Magis Core: Writing Across Curriculum

Prerequisite: SPAN 2211.

This course improves proficiency in written and oral expression by focusing on particular topics in Spanish language and culture. Students develop advanced writing and speaking skills while concentrating on grammar, style, and appropriateness. Weekly compositions, based primarily on the genres studied (short story, theater, memoirs, essay) allow students to identify and correct grammatical mistakes. Students present speeches in class and conduct situational dramas such as job interviews, television reporting, courtroom trials, debates in Spanish. Films and various cultural artifacts (comic strips, proverbs, songs) familiarize students with idiomatic Spanish. Previously SP 0220.

SPAN 2220H Advanced Spanish for Heritage Speakers    3 Credits

Attributes: MWAC Magis Core: Writing Across Curriculum, SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Prerequisite: Placement exam.

This course is directed at heritage speakers of Spanish, that is, students with personal background and prior instruction in Spanish who already possess functional communication abilities in the language. It will prepare students for upper-division literature, culture, linguistics, and translation courses by focusing on the development of advanced reading, writing, and oral abilities in Spanish. Emphasis will be placed on the main stages of the writing process through continuous practice inside and outside of the classroom. The class will use news articles, films, literary works, and other cultural texts. It will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Previously SP 0220H.

SPAN 3225 Spanish and English in Contrast    3 Credits

Prerequisite: SPAN 2220.

This class offers an in-depth review and study of the more problematic aspects of Spanish grammar for English speakers and provides students with the essentials of their own native grammar necessary to comprehend the similarities between English and Spanish. Previously SP 0225.

SPAN 3231B Career-Oriented Spanish for Business    3 Credits

Attributes: BUEL Business Elective, LCEL LACS Minor: Elective, SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Prerequisite: SPAN 2220.

This course aims to give post-intermediate students of Spanish a solid foundation of business vocabulary, basic business and cultural concepts, and situational practice that will prepare them to succeed in today's growing Spanish-speaking business world. It will incorporate a wide array of real-life situations and problems that will integrate all four language skills: speaking, reading, writing and listening. One of the main objectives of this course is to turn students into potential professionals by improving their critical thinking and problem-solving skills necessary in today's globalized business world. Previously SP 0231B.

SPAN 3231N Career-Oriented Spanish for Nursing and Health Studies    3 Credits

Attributes: HSTE Health Studies: Traditions, Delivery, and Ethics, LCEL LACS Minor: Elective, SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Prerequisite: SPAN 2220.

This to further develop Spanish skills in the four modes: speaking, listening, writing and reading to compliment health, pre-med and nursing studies at a post-intermediate level. In addition to an advanced course in Spanish grammar and vocabulary curated to the health studies needs, we will also explore the following topics through in-class presentations, role play, readings, and authentic texts from the Spanish-speaking world: Cultural competency, Lifespan issues, Bilingual health care systems, Health assessment in Spanish, and Patient teaching. Open to students interested in health professions, pre-med, nursing, etc. Previously SP 0231N.

SPAN 3245 Analysis and Interpretation of Hispanic Literature    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective

Prerequisite: SPAN 2220.

The course provides students with the fundamentals of literary analysis in the genres of poetry, narrative, theater, and film. It uses materials from around the Hispanic world to present a broad historical-cultural context for further reading and to sharpen the skills of analysis, argumentation, speaking, and writing. Focused on a literary study whose critical terms derive from the structure of literature itself (plot, scene, shot, verse, etc.), the course includes a survey of the periods of literary history. Students complete critical papers. Previously SP 0245.

SPAN 3251 Spanish Civilization and Culture    3 Credits

Prerequisite: SPAN 2220.

This course presents the main currents of Spanish civilization by means of lectures and student participation in written and oral reports. Studies of the geography, history, literature, and fine arts of Spain underscore class discussions. Previously SP 0251.

SPAN 3253 Spanish-American Civilization    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective, LCSC LACS Minor: Spanish Culture and Literature, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: SPAN 2220.

This course presents a general view of Spanish-American civilization from pre-Columbian times to the present. Participants study the culture, social history, and politics of Spanish-America through select literary readings, articles, documentaries, films, newspapers, and Internet research. The course includes a special topic covering the globalization in Latin America and its impact in the 21st century. Students complete exams, oral presentations, written papers, and a final paper. Previously SP 0253.

SPAN 3271 Hispanic Film    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective, LCSC LACS Minor: Spanish Culture and Literature, VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: SPAN 2220.

This course examines and analyzes film by Spanish and Latin-American directors (Buñuel, Saura, Littín, Sanjinés, etc.). Students initially study films as an independent genre using specific structural form as the means of analysis (close-up, soundtrack, frame, etc.). Students then begin to formulate interpretations that move between the formal, technical composition of films and the concrete socio-historic and cultural reality to which each film refers. Course activities include screening of films, discussion of articles that deal with literary theory and analysis of film, and writing short papers. Previously SP 0271.

SPAN 3285 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics    3 Credits

Attributes: MWID Magis Core: Writing in the Discipline

Prerequisite: SPAN 2220.

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of language, with a focus on Spanish. It particularly aims at both the descriptive and applied levels. At the descriptive level, it will focus on the understanding of the mechanisms of the language in various areas: how sounds are articulated and work within a system (phonetics and phonology); how small units with meaning are combined to form words (morphology); how words are combined to form sentences (syntax); how meaning is attached to the different units, and how meaning operates at different levels (semantics). At the applied level, it will also explore topics such as linguistic variation, second language acquisition, bilingualism, and the situation of Spanish in the United States. Taught in Spanish. Previously SP 0285.

SPAN 3286 Languages and Identities: Sociolinguistic Approaches to Spanish in the U.S.    3 Credits

Attributes: SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Prerequisite: SPAN 2220 or SPAN 2220H.

While the increased visibility of Spanish has surprised some in recent decades, people have been speaking Spanish in what is now the US for hundreds of years. This course offers an introduction to sociolinguistics, i.e., the study of the language in relation to social factors, with a focus on Spanish in the US. Particular emphasis is placed on social and political issues that impact the use and representation of Spanish. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 3980 Internship    3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

The internship program gives students first-hand experience in the fields of translation, interpretation, cataloging, public relations, advertising, teaching, etc., in the language of their specialization. Department members, who agree to guide the endeavor, supervise student work. When required by a faculty supervisor, evaluation of student interns may be required from the institution where students work. The student's work should demand no less than one full day per week, or its equivalent. Previously SP 0377-0378.

SPAN 3990 Independent Study    3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Students undertake readings and studies in a specialized area of Spanish, under the direction of a staff member. Designed to fill the special needs of specific students, this course is offered at the discretion of the department chair. Enrollment by permission only. Previously SP 0382.

SPAN 4302 Remembering the Spanish Civil War Through Contemporary Literature and Film    3 Credits

Attributes: MELT Magis Core Exploration: Literature, SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Prerequisite: SPAN 3245.

This course examines the recent investigative and cultural expression of events of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39), Franco Dictatorship (1939-75), and Transition to Democracy (1975-82). This cultural production parallels a push to physically excavate hundreds of Civil-War mass graves. Much like the demands to recover family members' bodies from these graves, an explicit social justice agenda is motivating novelists, playwrights, and filmmakers while they excavate the memory of these events. Through the study of contemporary Spanish literature and film, we examine the complex relationships between politics, social justice, cultural production, and the push to "recover" Spain’s historical memory. Previously SP 0302.

SPAN 4305 Popular Culture in Latin America    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective, LCSC LACS Minor: Spanish Culture and Literature

Prerequisite: SPAN 3245.

This course examines the interaction among mass, elite, traditional, and indigenous art forms, their relationship with the dynamics of national/cultural identity in Latin America in the 19th and 20th centuries, and globalization. Forms of expression include oral poetry and narrative; the folletin (19th-century melodramas by installment) to 20th-century "fotonovelas," "radionovelas," and "telenovelas"; broadsides; comics; musical and political movements such as neo-folklore, new song, Nueva Troba, and Rock Latino; artistic movements such as Mexican muralist; traditional and popular crafts; cooking; popular dance; and film. Previously SP 0305.

SPAN 4306 Cuban Film: A Close Look at the Revolution    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective, MELT Magis Core Exploration: Literature, MWID Magis Core: Writing in the Discipline, SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: SPAN 3245.

This class investigates topics in Cuban history, culture, and politics, by focusing on the impact of the Cuban Revolution on society as presented through one of the strongest contemporary Cuban cultural artifacts: Cuban film and film about Cuba. Since 1959 film has played a crucial role in officially narrating, shaping, critiquing and questioning the Revolution. We will analyze how film continues to serve as a space to reflect on the complexities of Cuban society, and how social media and technology is now challenging the limits of Cuban film, and possibly of the Revolution itself. Previously SP 0306.

SPAN 4307 Translation Theory and Practice: Spanish and English    3 Credits

Attributes: SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Prerequisite: SPAN 3245.

This course offers an introduction to the field of Translation Studies, both from theoretical and practical perspectives. Great emphasis will be placed on the translation process through continuous practice inside and outside of the classroom. Likewise, metalanguage and key concepts from translation theory will be progressively introduced through readings to facilitate the critical reflection and discussion of translation problems and solutions. The course will be taught in Spanish. Previously SP 0307.

SPAN 4309 Bilingualism in the Spanish-Speaking World    3 Credits

Attributes: SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Prerequisite: SPAN 3245.

The theme of this course is the issue of bilingualism, analyzed from three different angles: sociolinguistic, psycholinguistic, and educational. Bilingualism is a natural and widespread phenomenon, and research on this area has been growing over the last years in various fields, such as Applied Linguistics, Psychology, Sociology, or Education. Approximately half of the world population speaks two or more languages, and current research also shows cognitive advantages for those who speak more than one language. This course will offer students a critical overview of this phenomenon from the three perspectives mentioned above. The course will be conducted in Spanish. Previously SP 0309.

SPAN 4311 Glory, Splendor, and Decay: Spanish Golden Age Literature    3 Credits

Prerequisite: SPAN 3245.

This course studies the most important literary manifestations of the 16th and 17th centuries' Golden Age Spanish culture, with emphasis on Cervantes, Tirso de Molina, Lope de Vega, Quevedo, Góngora, and Calderón de la Barca. Previously SP 0311.

SPAN 4341 20th Century Spanish Literature    3 Credits

Prerequisite: SPAN 3245.

This course examines works and literary movements from the early part of the 20th century (Generation of '98) to present times. Representative authors include Unamuno, Baroja, Valle-Inclán, García Lorca, J.R. Jiménez, Cela, Laforet, Delibes, and Matute. Previously SP 0341.

SPAN 4346 Contemporary Spanish Theatre    3 Credits

Prerequisite: SPAN 3245.

This course examines several current themes in contemporary Spanish theatre. One topic is how Spanish theatre has engaged with the memory of historical moments such as the Spanish Civil War (1936-39), the ensuing Franco dictatorship (1939-75), and terrorism under democratic rule, particularly the post-9/11 terrorist bombings in Madrid. While reading a selection of contemporary Spanish plays, we will study the strategies used by playwrights to evoke or avoid the historical memory of these events. Previously SP 0346.

SPAN 4353 Spanish-American Narrative    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective, LCSC LACS Minor: Spanish Culture and Literature

Prerequisite: SPAN 3245.

This critical analysis and discussion of key words of the narrative genre emphasizes the 20th-century development of the novel and short story. Authors include Azuela, Quiroga, Borges, Bombal, Somers, Cortázar, García Márquez, Fuentes, Ferré, and Allende. The course also considers experimental writing, the short story of fantasy, testimonio, and others, and requires critical papers and oral reports. Open to juniors and seniors only. Previously SP 0353.

SPAN 4357 The Spanish Novel    3 Credits

Prerequisites: SPAN 3245, junior standing.

This course studies the novel of Spain from its first tentative manifestation with the picaresque through its major development with Cervantes and into the 20th century, emphasizing the works of more important writers. Previously SP 0357.

SPAN 4359 Culture, Civilization, and Literature in the Spanish-American Caribbean Region    3 Credits

Attributes: EDCG Educational Studies Cognate, EDDV Educational Studies Diversity, LCEL LACS Minor: Elective, LCSC LACS Minor: Spanish Culture and Literature, MELT Magis Core Exploration: Literature, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisites: SPAN 3245, junior standing.

This study and explanation of distinctive elements of Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Central American countries focuses on the fusion of indigenous, Black, and Hispanic as manifestation in the Spanish-American Caribbean Region. Students will read, study, and critically analyze relevant documents, and cultural materials from pre-Columbian populations until the contemporary period. Previously SP 0359.

SPAN 4360 Dictatorships and Revolutionary Movements in Contemporary Latin America    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective, LCSC LACS Minor: Spanish Culture and Literature, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: SPAN 3245.

This course will analyze various revolutionary movements in Latin America as well as the dictatorships that emerged in early 20th Century and ended almost at the turn of the century. We will discuss the new "neo-socialist" governments that have emerged in 21st Century Latin America since the end of the Socialist Block (1990s), under the dominant global economy. In this class we will read, analyze, and discuss critical essays and literature (narrative, poetry, and testimonies), and other cultural forms (such as fiction and documentary films, art, music, etc). Previously SP 0360.

SPAN 4371 Images of Latin American Indians    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective, LCSC LACS Minor: Spanish Culture and Literature, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisites: SPAN 3245, junior standing.

This course examines the vision of Latin American Indians from the first letters of the "discoverers" and conquistadores (Colón, Cortés, Bernal Díaz del Castillo), and missionaries (Bartolomé de las Casas) through relevant novels, short stories, and films of the 19th and 20th centuries. To understand the post-discovery vision of the Indians, this course also studies the major pre-Columbian civilization of Mesoamerica and the Andean region. Authors include: Matto de Turner, Icaza, Arguedas, Castellanos, and others. Previously SP 0371.

SPAN 4391 Introduction to Translation and Interpreting Studies, Spanish <> English    3 Credits

Attributes: SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Corequisite: SPAN 4392.

Prerequisite: Placement exam.

This course offers an exploration of key principles, main schools of thought, and fundamental controversies in translation and interpreting theory. It will provide a conceptual foundation for students to draw on when describing, planning, assessing, and justifying their translations. English-Spanish translations will be used to discuss theoretical concepts. The course will be taught in English and Spanish.

SPAN 4392 Non-Specialized Translation Practice, Spanish <> English    3 Credits

Attributes: SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Corequisite: SPAN 4391.

Prerequisite: Placement exam.

This course offers advanced intensive translation practice of non-specialized, non-fiction, non-literary texts. It will focus on the different steps of the translation process and it will emphasize detection and solving of translation problems through continued practice and reflection. Translation from Spanish into English will be prioritized, but translation from English into Spanish will also be practiced. The will be taught in English and Spanish.

SPAN 4393 Computer-Assisted Translation Tools, Spanish <> English    3 Credits

Attributes: SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Corequisite: SPAN 4394.

Prerequisite: SPAN 4391, SPAN 4392.

This course offers a hands-on introduction to computer-assisted translation tools used in the translation industry with a particular emphasis on SDL Trados Studio. Students will learn how to translate and review using SDL Trados Studio and how to manage terminological data using SDL Multiterm through the complexion of various English-Spanish translation tasks which mirror professional practice. The course will be taught in English and Spanish.

SPAN 4394 Commercial and Legal Translation, Spanish <> English    3 Credits

Attributes: SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Corequisite: SPAN 4393.

Prerequisite: SPAN 4391, SPAN 4392.

This course offers an introduction to the specifics of commercial and legal translation through advanced intensive translation practice of specialized commercial and legal texts. Translation from Spanish into English will be prioritized, but translation from English into Spanish will also be practiced. The course will be taught in English and Spanish.

SPAN 4395 Medical Translation, Spanish <> English    3 Credits

Attributes: SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Corequisite: SPAN 4396.

Prerequisite: SPAN 4393, SPAN 4394.

This course offers an introduction to the specifics of medical translation through advanced intensive translation practice of specialized medical texts. Translation from Spanish into English will be prioritized, but translation from English into Spanish will also be practiced. The course will be taught in English and Spanish.

SPAN 4396 Community Interpreting, Spanish <> English    3 Credits

Attributes: SPME Spanish Major or Minor Elective

Corequisite: SPAN 4395.

Prerequisite: SPAN 4393, SPAN 4394.

This course offers an introduction to interpreting in community settings, emphasizing medical and legal contexts. Sight translation, consecutive interpreting, and simultaneous interpreting will be practiced. The course will be taught in English and Spanish.

SPAN 4999 Capstone Seminar    3 Credits

Attributes: LCEL LACS Minor: Elective

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

This course is the senior capstone, in which every senior Spanish major during the spring semester of their senior year must complete a research paper for the major. The topic varies according to the professor teaching the capstone that semester. Enrollment by permission only. Previously SP 0381.

Professors

Carolan
Rankin

Associate Professors

Adrada-Rafael
Farrell
Goldfield, chair
Johnson
Xiao

Assistant Professors

Díaz
Gasca Jiménez
Gaskill (Visiting)
Rodríguez Cortés (Visiting)

Assistant Professors of the Practice

Erotopoulos
Wilkinson

Instructors of the Practice

Arango-Martín
Hernández

Lecturers

Arce
Boyce
Brea
Christopher
DeLuca
Eliasoph, Y.
Gizzi
Lara
Martinez-Meraz
Morabito
Pavon
Rigo de Alonso
Sarria
Shur
Syssoeva

Faculty Emeriti

Campos
Fedorchek
Garcia-Devesa
Hill
Sourieau
Webster