Politics (PO)

PO 0011 Introduction to American Politics3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, ASPO American Studies: Politics, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

Students examine the American political system and the American political culture; consider the major political institutions in relation to policy perspectives; examine the ability of the political system to deal with societal problems; and analyze proposals for reform of the political system.

PO 0012 Introduction to Comparative Politics3 Credits

Attributes: PMCP Politics Major: Comparative Politics, WDIV World Diversity

This course introduces students to the concepts and theories used to understand the structures and processes of diverse political systems. Comparing similarities and differences between different political systems will enable students to identify interesting questions about politics in specific countries, and to make systematic comparisons across countries.

PO 0014 Introduction to Political Theory3 Credits

Attributes: PMPT Politics Major: Political Theory

This course introduces students to the field of Western political theory. It analyzes the liberal political theories of Thomas Hobbes, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Locke, J.S. Mill, and Karl Marx, and compares and contrasts them to a variety of communitarian, socialist, and anarchist political theories.

PO 0112 21st Century Power Politics3 Credits

Attributes: PMPT Politics Major: Political Theory

How does power operate in the 21st century? This course engages this question by focusing on how contemporary thinkers from the Global North and South assess the world in which we live. The course will take on issues of globalization, democratization, cosmopolitanism, poverty, race, gender, citizenship, and environmentalism. The work of key thinkers such as Karl Marx, Hannah Arendt, Franz Fanon, Julius Nyrere, Michel Foucault, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Judith Butler, and Wendy Brown will be examined. These theorists present a critical assessment of the nature and value of contemporary society's cherished ideals of social and economic progress, secularization, and scientific reason, and individual autonomy and liberty. This course explores and evaluates these controversial critiques of life that shape our understanding power in the 21st century.

PO 0115 Introduction to the Study of Peace and Justice3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, ASPO American Studies: Politics, CAOT Catholic Studies: Non-Religious Studies, EDCG Educational Studies Cognate, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

This course introduces students to the concepts of peace and justice, the connections between them, and the relationship of these concepts to the idea of faith. The course focuses on case studies beginning with an analysis of the crisis of America's cities and finds the causes in de-industrialization and its resulting poverty. In both cases, the course views poverty as the effect of unjust economic and social structures including exaggerated military budgets at home and the militarization of developing countries. Examining these fundamental problems in peace and justice, according to the principles of Marxism, liberalism, and Catholicism, provides a theoretical basis for the study. Each of these traditions has its own perspective for understanding these problems and for responding to them. In this way the course provides an awareness of the major problems in peace and justice as well as an understanding of the different ways to think about them.

PO 0116 Utopian Politics3 Credits

Attributes: PMPT Politics Major: Political Theory

This course examines the nature and function of utopian thinking and utopian communities. What is the value of utopian reflection? What forms of critical thinking and imaginative speculation does it enable? What are the limits to or dangers of utopian thought and practice? What kinds of challenges do utopian communities face? This course explores and critically assesses utopian, and dystopian themes from utopian fiction, political theory, science fiction, and popular culture. The course involves students in building model utopias that resolve major world problems.

PO 0118 American Political Thought3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, ASPO American Studies: Politics, PMPT Politics Major: Political Theory

This course considers the philosophical roots of American political thought and the influence of the American revolutionaries, constitution-makers, Federalists, Jeffersonians, Jacksonians, Alexis de Tocqueville, examiners of the welfare state, pragmatists, and new frontiersmen on the contemporary American mind and institutions. The course also covers challenges and reform of the American political system within the scope of political science through an application of the concepts of human nature, idealism, constitutional power, and nationalism.

PO 0119 Sex, Sexuality, and Gender3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, ASPO American Studies: Politics, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, UDIV U.S. Diversity, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

This course focuses on how men and women ally together and separately to alter the landscape of sex, sexuality, and gender in the U.S. as part of a global wave of political change. The course examines how race, class, religion, age, disability, and other identity variables intersect with male and female, masculine and feminine, and the full range of sexualities in order to understand the theories and practices related to identity that shape twenty-first century politics.

PO 0123 Modern Political Ideologies3 Credits

Attributes: ISIC Italian Studies: Italy Component, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, PMPT Politics Major: Political Theory

This course primarily examines the political belief systems in the United States including conservatism, liberalism, democratic socialism, and the idea of industrial policy. It analyzes these "isms" with reference to democracy's ability to deal with the contemporary problems of American society. It also explores Marxism in terms of the basic political and economic ideas of Marx and Engels as well as the modifications made in their system by Lenin; discusses the basic concepts of racism; and briefly analyzes the meaning of totalitarianism.

PO 0127 United Nations Security Council Crisis Simulation3 Credits

Attributes: HACA Humanitarian Action Minor Context Course, WDIV World Diversity

This course gives students a hands-on learning experience in world diversity by simulating a United Nations Security Council crisis in international peace and security. The objective is to introduce students to the challenges of global governance in light of the different perspectives they encounter representing different constituencies of the UN Security Council who come from diverse cultural, historical, and geo-political regions of the world. A key goal of the course is to bring to light whether and how power disparities limit the global South's effective representation, and the stakes in reform of the Security Council. While the topic of the simulation will vary, the focus is on a crisis in a non-Western region of the world.

PO 0129 Politics of Humanitarian Action3 Credits

Attributes: PMIR Politics Major: International Relations, WDIV World Diversity

This course introduces students to complex humanitarian crises and the challenges of responding. Students explore why the often-troubled governance practices of humanitarian intervention makes this a highly contested, yet indispensable arena of global politics. The course examines enduring political and normative tensions at the core of the international humanitarian system run by states, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the United Nations and its lead agencies, and increasingly, the private sector. Students use critical theories, ethical frameworks and other skillsets to explore questions such as the accountability of humanitarian actors to the people they aid in risk-laden operational environments.

PO 0130 International Relations: Theories and Challenges3 Credits

Attributes: HACA Humanitarian Action Minor Context Course, PJST Peace and Justice Studies

This course introduces International Relations (IR) theories to students, providing concepts, frameworks and approaches that will help them make sense of global politics historically and today in a systematic and critical manner. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with these tools and to help them use them to understand and address challenges at a global scale, particularly different manifestations of violence, development and social injustice, including from war to economic, social, gendered, and political marginalization.

PO 0131 International Politics and the Environment3 Credits

Attributes: EVME Environmental Studies Major Elective, EVPE Environmental Studies Elective, EVSS Environmental Studies: Social Science, PMIR Politics Major: International Relations

This course examines important issues in the practice and study of international environmental policy. The course consists of four interrelated sections designed to provide the factual knowledge and conceptual frameworks required for working in this field: the process and difficulty of creating effective International environmental policy; factors that assist effective policy; history, trends and actors; and key current issues including climate change, biodiversity, toxic pollution, trade and the environment, sustainable development, and environment and security, among others.

PO 0132 Climate Change: Politics and Policy3 Credits

Attributes: EVME Environmental Studies Major Elective, EVPE Environmental Studies Elective, HACA Humanitarian Action Minor Context Course, PMIR Politics Major: International Relations

This course examines key political, scientific and economic issues surrounding global climate change. Topics include: the causes and impacts of climate change; policy-making under uncertainty; key technological, energy and economic issues; and, in particular, climate policy at the global, national, state and local levels; Students will gain the ability to understand and analyze climate policy options at the global, national and local levels.

PO 0133 United States Foreign Policy3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, ASPO American Studies: Politics, PMIR Politics Major: International Relations

How is foreign policy made in the United States? This course examines the impact of domestic and international actors and processes in the formation and conduct of United States foreign policy. It also provides a historical background on the basis of which it analyzes contemporary United States economic foreign policy, security foreign policy, environmental and energy foreign policy and the promotion of democracy and human rights in different regions of the world, including Asia, Latin America, Western Europe, Africa and the Middle East.

PO 0134 Globalization: Who Rules the World?3 Credits

Attributes: PMIR Politics Major: International Relations

In a globalizing world, understanding the link between wealth and power is increasingly important. This course seeks to explore the international and global context of the intersection of politics and the economy today. It examines the impact of globalization on states, markets, societies, businesses, and people by posing such questions as "In whose interest?" and "Who benefits?"

PO 0135 International Law3 Credits

Attributes: HACA Humanitarian Action Minor Context Course, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, PMIR Politics Major: International Relations

This course is an introduction to international law, which addresses the questions of what is international law, who makes international law and who is bound by it, and why states and other actors obey international law even though there is not world government to enforce it. The course also introduces students to the substance of international law on different areas such as human rights, the environment and the use of force in international politics. Finally, the course provides a practical overview to the United Nations system, focusing both on the five principal organs (the Security Council, the General Assembly, the Secretariat, ECOSOC and the International Court of Justice) and the specialized agencies (UNICEF, UNDP, and more).

PO 0136 Gender, War, and Peace3 Credits

Attributes: HACA Humanitarian Action Minor Context Course, PMIR Politics Major: International Relations, WDIV World Diversity, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

This course examines the complexities of the gendered impact of war on men, women, families and children. Students learn about the gendered dimensions of war institutions, social structures and narratives of war. They explore the topic especially from the voices and perspectives of women in war zones and post-conflict settings around the world, including historical memories. Students learn how the forces of globalization and existing conditions of structural violence make women extremely vulnerable as societies slide toward war.

PO 0137 Threats to Global Security in the 21st Century3 Credits

Attributes: HACA Humanitarian Action Minor Context Course, PMIR Politics Major: International Relations

This course is designed as an introduction to global security. It considers, traditional and new security topics, from interstate and civil wars to environmental degradation and famines. We will look at these topics through the lenses of major paradigms in International Relations (IR) theory, such as Realism, Liberalism and Constructivism and also from the perspective of Feminist, Critical and Peace studies' theories. In addition to learning to think about global security in a systematic and critical way, in this this course we will consider the political, ethical and social dimensions of threats to global security today.

PO 0138 Border Politics3 Credits

Attributes: HACA Humanitarian Action Minor Context Course, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, PMIR Politics Major: International Relations, WDIV World Diversity

This course explores how border politics have evolved from historical practices of territoriality and the rise of the nation-state system, including the social construction of "imagined communities" and the boundaries that define them. Yet this system faces many challenges. Drawing from critical theories of identity, state formation and intersectionality, students explore erosions of state sovereignty through globalization, climate change, crisis migration, refugee flows, asylum seekers, transnational crime and terrorism. As case studies from the global north and south illustrate, states are increasingly turning to global and domestic disciplinary regimes to wall up, fence out, surveillance, detain and deport the "other." Students examine these trends in the context of the moral, political, security, corporeal and human rights questions at stake.

PO 0139 European Politics3 Credits

Attributes: ISIC Italian Studies: Italy Component, PMCP Politics Major: Comparative Politics

This analysis of political institutions and dynamics of Great Britain, France, Germany, and Italy emphasizes the relationship between the political culture and the political system and analyzes alternate methods of dealing with societal problems.

PO 0140 Islam and Muslim Politics3 Credits

Attributes: ISIC Italian Studies: Italy Component, PMCP Politics Major: Comparative Politics, WDIV World Diversity

Islam is most often treated as a monolithic force when in fact the relationship between Islam, politics, and society is varied and dynamic. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the pluralism of Islam-influenced practices (such as in politics, education, charitable aid, and business) drawing on examples from Turkey, Indonesia, Central Asia and China.

PO 0141 African Politics3 Credits

Attributes: BSFC Black Studies Focus Course, BSSS Black Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences, PMCP Politics Major: Comparative Politics, WDIV World Diversity

This course examines political patterns in Africa with an emphasis on the relationships between politics and culture, and politics and economy. Themes and concepts, not country studies, structure the course, which extracts patterns that are universal or typical in sub-Saharan Africa, examines the colonial legacy on which contemporary states build, and considers the political problematic that the colonial experience imparts with respect to cultural issues of identity, tribalism, and ethnicity in Africa. The course also examines the role of force and violence in consolidating political rule, the economic constraints that fetter Africa, and considers prospects for Africa's politics.

PO 0142 Latin American Politics3 Credits

Attributes: PMCP Politics Major: Comparative Politics, WDIV World Diversity

This course examines contemporary Latin American politics, with particular attention to the challenges and opportunities for democracy and human rights in the region. In order to do this, the course provides a historical background that examines the challenges and opportunities presented by domestic and international dynamics in the region. The course covers the causes and consequences of democratic breakdowns in the region and the transition to democracy in the later part of the twentieth century. It also addresses the difficulties these young democracies face today and the continuous and uneven efforts to advance human rights in the region.

PO 0143 Caribbean Politics3 Credits

Attributes: BSCC Black Studies Component Course, BSSS Black Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences, PMCP Politics Major: Comparative Politics, WDIV World Diversity

Racism and ethnic conflict, colonialism and neocolonialism, grating poverty and bustling tourism all have their impact on the politics of these struggling countries. This course examines migration across the first world's borders in countries that include Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, Guyana, and Suriname. Students complete a research project.

PO 0144 Middle Eastern Politics3 Credits

Attributes: PJST Peace and Justice Studies, PMCP Politics Major: Comparative Politics, WDIV World Diversity

This course examines the modern Middle East by familiarizing students with the most significant contemporary problems and controversies in the region. Themes and concepts, not individual country studies, structure the course. Some of the topics covered are youth, war, revolution, oil, political Islam, economic reform, and the Arab spring.

PO 0145 East Asian Politics3 Credits

Attributes: PMCP Politics Major: Comparative Politics, WDIV World Diversity

This course examines the domestic politics of Asian countries. Asia is a vibrant region politically and economically, and is very important to the United States for international security and economic stability. Given its importance, this course provides broad and essential knowledge about Asian nations. The course begins with historical background of various countries in Asia, and then examines politics in selected Asian countries. Country studies are intended to introduce major issues in comparative politics such as democracy, economic development, ideology and political conflict.

PO 0147 Northern Ireland: The Politics of War and Peace3 Credits

Attributes: CAOT Catholic Studies: Non-Religious Studies, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, PMCP Politics Major: Comparative Politics

This course focuses on "the Troubles" in Northern Ireland from 1969 to the present beginning with historical background that emphasizes England's role from the 17th century through the present. It examines the 20th century conflict primarily as a national liberation struggle against a sectarian regime in the North supported by England. The course follows a chronological format starting with the civil rights marches in the late 1960's, the state repression that followed and subsequent community responses including the hunger strikes and electoral campaigns. It concludes with the peace process and grassroots efforts by former paramilitaries from both Catholic and Protestant communities to work together on issues of common concern.

PO 0148 Political Violence3 Credits

Attributes: PMCP Politics Major: Comparative Politics

This course offers a comparative study of political violence including civil war, terrorism, and separatist movements. We will examine a variety of theoretical and empirical approaches to violence. The course is designed to introduce students to core debates as well as cutting edge research on violence. Students will also learn about political violence across the globe through single country studies.

PO 0149 The Development Gap: Can It Be Closed?3 Credits

Attributes: PJST Peace and Justice Studies, PMCP Politics Major: Comparative Politics, WDIV World Diversity

This course introduces a comparative approach to studying the forces affecting development in the Third World. Examples are selectively drawn from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. It examines the roots of wealth and poverty, obstacles to development, responses to globalization, and current debates over the development prospects of the Third World.

PO 0150 Urban Politics3 Credits

Attributes: ASPO American Studies: Politics, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

This course examines structures and processes of urban politics and considers the major participants and policy areas of urban political processes. It sets the evolution of urban areas in historical perspective, discusses major contemporary problems, and analyzes alternative solutions.

PO 0153 The Politics of Race, Class, and Gender3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, ASPO American Studies: Politics, BSCC Black Studies Component Course, BSSS Black Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, PMPT Politics Major: Political Theory, UDIV U.S. Diversity, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

This course investigates how race, class, and gender function in American political culture. Students explore how the theoretical ideas of central thinkers such as Thomas Jefferson, Martin Luther King Jr., and Susan B. Anthony shape the political practices of the people who express themselves in songs, speeches, art, and music. The focus on race, class, and gender enables students to engage with historically challenging questions about equality, freedom, individualism, republicanism, liberalism, and American exceptionalism from alternative perspectives. The course does so by assessing whether or not the contemporary Hip Hop movement can overcome the barriers of race, class, and gender.

PO 0155 Public Administration3 Credits

Attributes: ASPO American Studies: Politics, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

The course focuses on the role of the bureaucracy within the political process, examining the problems of efficiency and accountability, and studying the classic models of bureaucratic organization and function in juxtaposition to the reality of bureaucratic operation. It analyzes proposed reforms to determine the viability of change.

PO 0161 The American Presidency3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, ASPO American Studies: Politics, ASUP American Studies Upper Level, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

The course will examine the expansion of presidential powers by 20th-21st century modern presidents, focusing on the constitutional and political development in the President's role as chief executive, legislative leader, and administrative head of state. It will also explore and seek explanations for differences and patterns among presidents in their foreign and domestic policy success, evaluating changes in the recruitment process (primaries, conventions and elections), issues of psychology, race, religion, economic forces, political parties, 'political time', and media.

PO 0162 United States Congress3 Credits

Attributes: ASPO American Studies: Politics, ASUP American Studies Upper Level, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

This course firstly examines the development of rules, procedures, and structures of Congress as the foremost institution of representation within American democracy, exploring its place in contemporary American politics and its often-contentious relationship with the other branches of national government, the Presidency and Courts. It will also introduce some primary theoretical approaches to the study of Congress as a deliberative body designed to produce national policy outcomes. Finally, it will develop students' understanding of individual members of Congress - their relationship to constituents, their differing styles of representation, and the effects of race, gender, ideology, and money on their legislative work.

PO 0163 Supreme Court3 Credits

Attributes: ASPO American Studies: Politics, ASUP American Studies Upper Level, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

This examination of the politics of the Supreme Court analyzes the relationship between the Court and the remainder of the political system; examines the Court's treatment of government power including commerce clause, taxing power, and relations between the branches; and emphasizes the political consequences of Court decisions.

PO 0164 Supreme Court II3 Credits

Attributes: ASPO American Studies: Politics, ASUP American Studies Upper Level, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

This examination of the individual and the Court pays direct attention to Supreme Court decisions regarding civil liberties, including freedoms of speech, press, religion, and assembly. It also examines the rights of accused persons and the 14th amendment equal protection, emphasizing the political implications of these decisions as well as the political environment in which the Court functions.

PO 0165 Political Parties and Interest Groups3 Credits

Attributes: ASPO American Studies: Politics, ASUP American Studies Upper Level, BSCC Black Studies Component Course, BSSS Black Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics, UDIV U.S. Diversity

This course examines various linkage models that describe representation of citizens by leaders. Moreover, it examines political parties, interest groups, and public opinion in terms of their contributions to popular control of American politics. What mechanisms do citizens have to gain compliance for their policy preferences? How responsive are decision makers in the American system to citizens' demands? The course considers these and other questions.

PO 0166 American Public Policy3 Credits

Attributes: ASPO American Studies: Politics, ASUP American Studies Upper Level, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

This course examines the policy process in the United States by assessing a variety of contemporary policy issues. Students investigate different policy domains to uncover the politics and societal myths affecting different stages of the complicated policy process, paying special attention to people and institutions that formally and informally influence public policy in the United States, including media, elected officials, bureaucrats, consumers, private citizens, workers, political activists, corporations, interest groups, lobbyists, and political parties.

PO 0167 Media and Politics3 Credits

Attributes: ASPO American Studies: Politics, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

This course examines the impact of the media on the American political system and, conversely, how government attempts to influence the media for its purposes, and implications of the electronic media for a democratic and informed society. The course pays close attention to the media's impact on national elections and analyzes the media as an agent of political socialization.

PO 0169 United States Environmental Politics and Policy3 Credits

Attributes: ASPO American Studies: Politics, ASUP American Studies Upper Level, EVME Environmental Studies Major Elective, EVPE Environmental Studies Elective, EVSS Environmental Studies: Social Science, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

This course introduces students to the processes, actors, casual factors and theoretical approaches central to the creation and implementation of US environmental policy. The first section examines the history of US environmental politics, the policy process, and prominent theories that seek to explain that process. The second examines the role of key institutions, including the President, Congress, courts, federal agencies, environmental groups and corporations. The third section examines key current issues, including risk assessments, economic tools, air and water pollution, toxic chemicals, public lands endangered species, water shortages, and climate change.

PO 0170 The Battle Over Family Values in American Politics3 Credits

Attributes: ASPO American Studies: Politics, ASUP American Studies Upper Level, PMAP Politics Major: American Politics, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

Contemporary American politics is marked by numerous debates about the family in American society. Issues of gay marriage, abortion, abstinence/ pre-marital sex, shifting gender roles within the family, and new parenting and reproductive methods are some of the hotly debated policy issues, illustrating the political struggle to define the soul of America and the role of the family within. This course explores such contemporary political debates over the family, their policy implications and significance to current elections, also examining the historical context and previous ideological battles that characterize the tumultuous relationship between the family and the American state. Seminar format.

PO 0171 State and Local Politics3 Credits

Attributes: PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

This course examines the role of state and local governments within the United States. State and local governments are unique subnational governments with their own political culture and identity and very greatly within and across the American political system. This course explores the political processes and the institutions of state and local governments. The course highlights the multifaceted, and often difficult, issues facing sub-national governments; the philosophies of state and local governments; their responsibility and function regarding election administration and voting; and their role within the larger national government.

PO 0172 Public Opinion and Polling3 Credits

Attributes: PMAP Politics Major: American Politics

A central feature to American democracy is that the public must play an active role in governing. This course invites students to think about and reflect on the role of public opinion, the tools used to measure it, and its impact on policies and elections, in American democracy. Students will examine what public opinion is, publics’ knowledge of politics, how citizens are socialized politically, group differences in public opinions, and various methods employed to measure public opinion. By the end of the course, you will be able to determine when and how public opinion influences various aspects of American politics.

PO 0190 Special Topics (Shell)3 Credits

This course offers a focused examination of a significant political issue or topic chosen from the areas of American Politics and Public Policy, Political Theory, Comparative Politics, and International Relations. Content will vary in successive offerings of this course. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: six hours of politics credits or permission of instructor

PO 0210 Seminar on Global Environmental Politics3 Credits

Attributes: EVME Environmental Studies Major Elective, EVPE Environmental Studies Elective, PMIR Politics Major: International Relations

The causes, consequences and potential solutions to environmental problems are increasingly important subjects in global politics. This seminar explores critical, current issues in the theory and practice of global environmental politics. Readings and class discussion examine important new debates, including those on: reason for policy effectiveness; international regimes; accountability; the 2015 Paris climate agreement; why global ozone policy remains a relatively unique example of effective global environmental policy; the most prominent theoretical lenses employed by researchers and policy-makers; and the activities of international institutions.

PO 0220 Seminar on Feminist Theory3 Credits

Attributes: ASPO American Studies: Politics, ASUP American Studies Upper Level, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, PMPT Politics Major: Political Theory, UDIV U.S. Diversity, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

This course explores advanced topics in feminist theory, examining a number of trends in contemporary feminist theory. Topics include conceptions of the female body in Western culture, feminist theories of the family, global feminisms, theories of feminist subjectivity and gender performativity, and the intersections among gender, race, class, and sexuality.

PO 0296 State Legislature Internship6 Credits

Prerequisites: PO 0011, two other politics courses.

Politics majors participate in the Connecticut General Assembly Legislative Internship Program, where students become acquainted with the legislative process by serving as aides to a legislator. Students complete a required research paper. Students must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Enrollment by departmental permission only.

PO 0297 Washington Semester Internship15 Credits

Prerequisites: PO 0011, two other politics courses.

Politics majors work full-time as interns in a variety of public and private sector positions in the nation's capital, giving them the opportunity to experience governmental problems firsthand and apply what they have learned. Students earn nine credits for working as an intern, three for a course taken in Washington, DC, and for a major research paper. Students must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Enrollment by departmental permission only.

PO 0298 Internship3 or 4 Credits

Prerequisites: Three politics courses.

Politics majors gain firsthand experience working off campus in fields related to their major. Typically, an internship requires 10 to 12 hours per week on site. The internship requires a journal and a term paper. An on-site supervisor and a politics professor evaluate student work. Students must have a GPA or 3.0 or higher. Enrollment by departmental permission only.

PO 0344 Seminar on the Middle East3 Credits

Attributes: PMCP Politics Major: Comparative Politics

Prerequisite: PO 0144.

The affairs of the Middle East continue to engage a great deal of international attention. This course offers the opportunity to examine a significant problem or issue concerning politics in the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region conducted in a seminar format. In various semesters the seminar may be taught with a different focus.

PO 0390 Politics Seminar3 Credits

This course offers an in-depth investigation of a significant political issue or topic and is conducted in a seminar format and contains a significant research component. Open only to juniors and seniors by permission of the instructor.

PO 0398 Independent Study/Research3 Credits

Prerequisites: PO 0011, two other politics courses.

Upon request and by agreement with an individual professor in the department, a politics major may conduct a one-semester independent study on a defined research topic or field of study. Students must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Enrollment by departmental permission only.