Sociology (SO)

SO 0011 Introduction to Sociology3 Credits

This introduction to sociology provides students with a sense of sociology's orientation; its particular way of looking at human behavior in the context of people's interaction with each other. The course emphasizes the kinds of questions sociology asks, the methods it uses to search for answers, and how it applies the answers to problems of people's everyday lives and issues of social policy.

SO 0112 American Society3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, ASSO American Studies: Sociology, UDIV U.S. Diversity

This course analyzes the dominant ideology and values that have shaped American culture -- namely the Protestant ethic -- and how and why these values are changing. The course also analyzes major institutional trends that have transformed and continue to transform America and the modern world - bureaucratization, industrialization, urbanization, the rise of the business corporation, science, and technology - and the effects of these institutions in producing new personality types, mass society, and rapid social change. The course provides a macro-sociological framework.

SO 0142 Sociology of the Family3 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology, WSGC Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Component

The family is a basic social institution of all societies. This course, which examines family systems as they exist in other cultures and in times past, focuses on understanding the contemporary American family system. Students consider American patterns of dating, mate selection, sexual behavior, marriage, parenting, and aging, as well as alternative life styles and family instability.

SO 0144 Sociology of Sexuality3 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

This course explores the social construction of human sexual behavior, examining the influence of social institutions on sexuality, social responses to variations in behaviors, and the organization of sexual identities.

SO 0151 Sociology of Religion3 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology, UDIV U.S. Diversity

This course offers a combined theoretical and empirical treatment of the sociology of religion, the character of religious institutions, the relations of religious institutions with other institutions in society, and the internal social structure of religious institutions. It gives particular attention to the process of secularization in the modern world and the crisis this poses for traditional religion.

SO 0161 American Class Structure3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, ASSO American Studies: Sociology, EDCG Educational Studies Cognate, EDDV Educational Studies Diversity, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, UDIV U.S. Diversity

This course examines the roots and structure of class in the United States and the consequences of this hierarchical arrangement on everyday life. It focuses primarily on social class; however, the dynamics and consequences of social class cannot be fully understood without addressing the complex interconnections between class, race, and gender.

SO 0162 Race, Gender, and Ethnic Relations3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, ASSO American Studies: Sociology, BSCC Black Studies Component Course, BSSS Black Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences, EDCG Educational Studies Cognate, EDDV Educational Studies Diversity, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, UDIV U.S. Diversity, WSGC Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Component

This course analyses sociological and social psychological dimensions of race relations, ethnic interaction, and the changing role and status of women. It focuses on the American scene but also examines problems of women and minorities in other parts of the world and their importance for world politics. It also considers what sociologists and social psychologists have learned about improving dominant/minority relations.

SO 0163 Urban/Suburban Sociology: NYC3 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology, BSCC Black Studies Component Course, BSSS Black Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences

This course explores the nature of the city and growth of metropolitan regions in the contemporary world; the ecological approach and the use of demographic data in the analysis of modern urban communities; social organization of metropolitan regions and the emergence of urban-suburban conflict; big-city politics, community control, and regional government as dimensions of organization and disorganization in city life; and city planning and urban development at local and national levels as efforts to solve the urban crisis.

SO 0165 Race, Cities, and Poverty3 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology, BSFC Black Studies Focus Course, BSSS Black Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences, EDCG Educational Studies Cognate, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, UDIV U.S. Diversity

The geography of cities is in constant flux. People move in and out, businesses open and close, city government institutes social policy in response to existing changes in different communities. Many of the changes in cities have been influenced by racial-ethnic and economic dynamics. In this course we will examine the ways race has shaped our perceptions of and responses to community. Why are urban areas "racialized"? Why does talk of the underclass imply black Americans and Latinos? We will focus primarily on black Americans, but will also consider white ethnic groups and other ethnic groups in discussion. In our examinations we will focus on case studies of urbanization and race such as post-Katrina New Orleans, southern migration to Chicago, and Bridgeport.

SO 0166 Feminism, Gender, and Everyday Life3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, ASSO American Studies: Sociology, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

This course provides an introduction to the study of gender through a feminist lens. The central themes of the course are the changes and continuities of gender roles within the United States, the social processes that influence our gender identities, and the connections between gender, power, and inequality. The course addresses the ways in which the media, popular culture, work, and schools have been pivotal sites for the creation and maintenance of gender performances, and explores sites of resistance in art and activism. The course pays special attention to the ways in which race, class, and sexualities intersect processes of gender relations and social change.

SO 0169 Women: Work and Sport3 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, UDIV U.S. Diversity, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

Sex and gender stratification exists in most areas of everyday life throughout American society. This course concentrates on women in the workplace and in sport. It analyzes women's occupational status and the accompanying roles from the colonial period to the present from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Since sport is a microcosm of society, the course treats the perceptions and experiences of female athletes in 20th-century America as a mirror of the inequality within the larger world.

SO 0171 Criminology3 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology

This course examines crime rates and crime trends in the U.S. Theories of criminal behavior are critically analyzed. It also explores victimless crime, white collar crime and organized crime. Societal responses to crime and criminals are addressed.

SO 0175 Sociology of Law3 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology

Based in the relationship of law and society, this course explores the meaning of law, civil disobedience, and other challenges, and law as an agent of social change. It takes as its major theme legal equality versus social inequality and analyzes this theme in terms of discrimination against the poor, women, and various racial groups. Students discuss the role of lawyers, the police, and the courts in American society in the second half of the semester.

SO 0179 Death Penalty in America3 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology, PJST Peace and Justice Studies

This course is an in-depth analysis of capital punishment. The history of the death penalty and its contemporary status in the U.S. is explored. Public opinion and the decisions of the courts, prosecutors, and juries are addressed. Some of the questions raised include the following: Is the death penalty a deterrent? Is it racially biased? Does it victimize the poor? Are the innocent ever convicted and executed? What sociological factors influence clemency decisions? How is the U.S. position on the death penalty perceived by the international community?

SO 0184 Population: Birth, Death, and Migration3 Credits

Attributes: HSSS Health Studies: Social Science, WDIV World Diversity

Demography, the study of population, is the basis of this course. It examines the causes and consequences of population change. The course addresses global population problems and those faced by the United States. Students analyze real demographic data during weekly demographic techniques sessions.

SO 0185 Introduction to International Migration3 Credits

Attributes: BSCC Black Studies Component Course, BSSS Black Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences, EDCG Educational Studies Cognate, HACA Humanitarian Action Minor Context Course, WDIV World Diversity

This course examines the causes, processes, and concerns of international migration, which are explored through the use of case studies that include a wide range of countries from different world regions. These case studies include international migrants, such as refugees, labor migrants, and undocumented migrants. In addition to studying the migrants and the reasons for their international movement, participants have the opportunity to discuss opposing perspectives on the immigration policies of developed countries.

SO 0188 Contemporary Latin American and Caribbean Society3 Credits

This course introduces the basic political, economic, and sociological elements of contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean. It begins with an overview of the historical events that have shaped the region. While examining the region as a whole, this course also emphasizes the political, economic, and cultural diversity that characterizes Latin America and the Caribbean. Drawing from several disciplines, while emphasizing sociological approaches, this course explains some of the positive, as well as the more dubious events in contemporary Latin American and Caribbean society. Topics include popular culture, migration, political change, regional integration, urbanization, gender, and inequality, among others. Case studies will be selected for more detailed discussion based on current events.

SO 0189 Sociology of Europe3 Credits

This course introduces the basic political, economic, and sociological elements of contemporary Europe. It begins with an overview of historical events that have shaped the region. While examining the region as a whole, this course also emphasizes the political, socioeconomic and more recent cultural diversity that characterizes the European continent. Topics include political developments and regional integration such as the creation of the European Union, geopolitical dilemmas, popular culture, migration, social change, public policies, inequality and secularization. A comparative macro-sociological framework will be used to discuss differences and similarities with contemporary American society.

SO 0190 Globalization3 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology

The single most powerful force transforming the world in which we live is the accelerating process of globalization. Information from the Internet, ideas, technology, products, services (and even people, the slowest to move) are all moving within and across national boundaries every hour of every day. As Joseph Stiglitz, former chief economist for the World Bank, puts it, "Globalization is like a giant wave that can either capsize nations or carry them forward on its crest." The goal of this course is to begin to understand the complex causes and effects of globalization. What's driving it and what kind of future is it likely to bring?

SO 0191 Social Change in Developing Nations3 Credits

Attributes: WDIV World Diversity

This course examines the major societal changes occurring in developing countries, seeking answers to two basic questions: To what extent are the current modernization efforts of Third World nations comparable to the earlier experience of the United States and Western Europe? How do existing inequalities and dependencies between developed countries and Third World nations affect their chances of modernizing? Students complete a semester-long Web-based study of a particular country.

SO 0192 Social Work: An Introduction3 Credits

Attributes: HSSS Health Studies: Social Science

This overview of the social work profession emphasizes the knowledge base, theories, values, and skills that underlie generalist social work practice with individuals, groups, families, and communities. Students consider a range of social problems and social policy concerns as well as the impact of these issues on diverse client populations. The course also conducts a related exploration of the role of the social worker in agency settings and the various fields of practice.

SO 0193 History of Social Welfare3 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology, HSSS Health Studies: Social Science, PJST Peace and Justice Studies

The course explores the development of the social work profession within the context of the evolution of social welfare in the United States, emphasizing the political, economic, social, and philosophical forces that have forged social welfare policy and helped shape the social work profession. Exploration of the importance of divisions in American society regarding social justice and issues of class, race, ethnicity, and gender provide a framework through which to view current controversies such as welfare reform and the feminization of poverty.

SO 0194 Sociology of Education3 Credits

Attributes: BSCC Black Studies Component Course, BSSS Black Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences, EDCG Educational Studies Cognate, EDDV Educational Studies Diversity, UDIV U.S. Diversity

This course introduces students to sociological perspectives on education. We will focus on the structure, practices, content, and outcomes of schooling in contemporary society. Throughout the semester, we address three fundamental questions. What are the primary goals of American education? Why are there systematic patterns of race, class, and gender inequality in education? How can we use the sociological lens to understand, contextualize, and alleviate educational problems in the real world? Drawing upon readings dealing primarily with American education, we discuss how educational experiences influence important life outcomes including lifetime earnings, health status, and interaction with the criminal justice system.

SO 0221 Statistics: Social and Political Data Analysis4 Credits

Attributes: EVAP Environmental Studies: Applied Professional Skills

Prerequisite: SO 0011.

This course provides a basic introduction to the role of statistical analysis in understanding social and political data, with an emphasis on actual data analysis using the University's computer facilities. It uses an extensive social and political data archive including 2000 Census data, political polls, and national survey data for computer analysis.

SO 0222 Methods of Research Design4 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology, EVAP Environmental Studies: Applied Professional Skills

Prerequisite: SO 0011.

This course examines the nature and function of scientific methods as applied to the field of sociology, emphasizing survey research design and secondary analysis of existing data. Student teams design and conduct research projects as part of the course assignments.

SO 0228 Classical Social Theory3 Credits

Prerequisite: SO 0011.

This course in sociological theory concentrates on the writings of Smith, Marx, Durkheim, and Weber, placing their theories in the context of the social, economic, political, and intellectual turmoil of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The course includes a focus on the development of sociology as a discipline in the early 20th century and the enduring concerns of the perspective to analyze "modern" industrialized societies.

SO 0229 Contemporary Social Theory3 Credits

Prerequisite: SO 0011.

This course focuses on contemporary American and European sociology and its development after 1945, examining critical social theory, structural functionalism, symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology, feminism, world systems theory and post modernism. Contemporary application is a central concern in the course.

SO 0279 Criminal Justice System Seminar3 Credits

Attributes: ASUP American Studies Upper Level, PJST Peace and Justice Studies

This seminar explores in detail the workings and problems of the criminal justice system in the United States. In addition to investigating the sources of criminal behavior, the course focuses on the arraignment process, probation, the trial, sentencing, prison reform, and parole.

SO 0390 Special Topics (Shell)3 Credits

Special Topics in Sociology provides an opportunity for students and faculty to explore compelling themes that are not covered in the department's regular course rotation and curriculum.

SO 0397 Field Work Placement3 Credits

In this one- or two-semester internship program, students are placed in professional and service settings where they work under supervision and acquire experience in the area chosen for placement. In addition, they integrate their experiences with the intellectual foundation acquired in their academic courses. Open to senior majors only.

SO 0398 Field Work Placement3 or 6 Credits

In this one- or two-semester internship program, students are placed in professional and service settings where they work under supervision and acquire experience in the area chosen for placement. In addition, they integrate their experiences with the intellectual foundation acquired in their academic courses. Open to senior majors only.

SO 0399 Independent Study3 Credits

Upon the request and by agreement of an individual professor in the department, students undertake a one-semester independent study on a defined research topic or field.