Communication (CO)

CO 0100 Human Communication Theories3 Credits

This course introduces major theoretical perspectives that inform communication scholarship. This foundational course for the major emphasizes understanding human communication as a symbolic process that creates, maintains, and alters personal, social, and cultural identities. Students critique research literature in the communication field in this course, which is a prerequisite for the 200- and 300-level communication courses. This course counts in the social and behavioral sciences core curriculum for non-majors.

CO 0101 Argument and Advocacy3 Credits

This introduction to public speaking and the advocacy process includes topic identification; methods of organization, research, selection, and arrangement of support materials; audience analysis and adaptation; patterns and fallacies of reasoning; uses of evidence; logical proof; and refutation. Students practice and critique informative and persuasive presentations in this course, which is a skill required in all 200- and 300-level communication courses.

CO 0102 Introduction to Public Relations3 Credits

This course introduces public relations as a field of study and as a practice. Through building critical thinking and considering ethical behaviors, this course will not only introduce you to the various types of public relations but will also help you to become a critical consumer of the public relations efforts taking place in the world around you while developing your own public relations tools and strategies.

CO 0130 Mass Media and Society3 Credits

Attributes: GDCO Graphic Design: Communication

This media literacy course offers theoretical and practical tools to critically analyze media texts, as well as understand different ways in which audiences interact with them. Students will inquire into how the pervasive mediation of human experience through mass communication channels affects almost every aspect of socialization processes and people's symbolic environment. The interplay between structural constraints conveyed in media's messages and humans' capacity to exercise interpretive agency is addressed through lectures, audiovisual examples, hands-on activities, and a variety of assignments aimed at discerning the elements that intervene in the construction and reception of media texts, beyond their apparent components. This course counts in the social and behavioral sciences core curriculum for non-majors.

CO 0200 Interpersonal Communication Theories3 Credits

Prerequisite: CO 0100.

An examination of one-to-one relationships from a variety of theoretical perspectives, this course focuses on the centrality of communication in building familial bonds, friendships, and work teams. Students examine factors influencing interpersonal communication such as language, perception, nonverbal behavior, power, status, and gender roles.

CO 0201 Persuasion3 Credits

Prerequisite: CO 0100 or CO 0102.

This course develops students' understanding of the major theoretical approaches to the study of persuasion as a particular type of social influence, giving specific attention to the processes of interpersonal influence and the media's role in changing social attitudes. Students construct communication campaigns to apply persuasion concepts and skills.

CO 0202 Small Group Communication3 Credits

Prerequisite: CO 0100 or CO 0102.

This course examines the basic characteristics and consequences of small-group communication processes in various contexts including family, education, and work groups. The course stresses interaction analysis and teambuilding. Because the course involves examining small groups in process, students do a substantial amount of group work.

CO 0220 Introduction to Organizational Communication3 Credits

Attributes: BUEL Business Elective

Prerequisite: CO 0100 or CO 0102.

Taking a historical and communication-centered approach to understanding how business and professional organizations function, this course addresses the analysis of upward, downward, and lateral communication; communication channels and networks; power and critical theory; organizations as cultures; internal and external public communication; and leadership. The course uses a case study approach.

CO 0231 Media Institutions3 Credits

Attributes: ENDE Digital Journalism Elective

Prerequisite: CO 0130.

The course concentrates on the economic, political, and legal environment of U.S. mass media. Issues include examination of individual media industries, the economic structure of U.S. media markets, media law and regulation, media watchdogs, advocacy organizations, and media users' forms of collective action. The course's content is approached through an institutional analysis perspective, intended to facilitate students' understanding of institutions as dynamic points of confluence for organizations, norms, and individual agents. As part of the course's requirements, students conduct a research project exploring recent developments and/or decision-making processes within one of the major media institutions covered during the semester.

CO 0233 Information Technologies: Economics, Law, and Policy3 Credits

Attributes: ENDE Digital Journalism Elective

Prerequisite: CO 0130.

An in-depth exploration of current issues and trends that shape the institutional environment of information industries and new media, both domestically and globally. By digesting and analyzing a diversity of scholarly sources, news reports, and materials generated by multiple stakeholders, students will gain a critical perspective on major economic, legal, and policy questions that affect the production, access to, circulation, and processing of digital content, such as broadband penetration, regulation of intellectual property, crowdsourcing, privacy, surveillance, net neutrality, emerging revenue models for information goods, and regulation and governance of the Internet.

CO 0236 Gender, Sexuality, and Media3 Credits

Attributes: UDIV U.S. Diversity, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

Prerequisite: CO 0130.

This course enables students to examine the relationship between the representation of women and the development of personal and social identity. Students explore issues of gender and reception, cultivating consumerism, body image, and developing relevant new images through theoretical readings as well as the analysis of various media, including television, film, magazines, and advertisements. The course also covers the experiences of women in a variety of media professions.

CO 0237 Sports, Media, and Culture3 Credits

Attributes: UDIV U.S. Diversity

Prerequisite: CO 0130.

Sports have long played a vital yet complex role in culture and this course examines the intersection of sports, the mass media, and society. Drawing upon Durkheimian theory, we will appraise and debate the ways in which sports are functional or problematic in their impact on and relationship to players, fans, journalists, co-cultural groups, and nations. Students will read both scholarly and journalistic reflections, view popular and documentary films, and analyze fan experiences, mediated presentations, and critical social issues. In short, we will go beyond the box score to understand the importance - and deconstruct the hype - that accompanies modern sports.

CO 0238 Communication and Popular Culture3 Credits

Attributes: ASCO American Studies: Communication

Prerequisite: CO 0130.

This course takes the cultural artifacts that engulf us, from fashion to television and from music to comic books, and removes these practices and texts from simply being "entertainment" or "diversion" and asks what these things mean, how they constitute power, and how they shape and reflect the lived experiences of consumers. This course takes very seriously those things that are typically discarded as lacking substance and instead suggests that the meanings and impact of popular culture have dramatic consequences for political, social, and cultural life in the United States.

CO 0239 Consumer Culture3 Credits

Attributes: UDIV U.S. Diversity

Prerequisite: CO 0130.

This course explores how social meanings are constructed through commodities and material society, how consumer goods and practices create categories of social difference. In particular, the course focuses on the intersections of consumer practices and gender/sexuality, race and class, articulating the relationship between communication and consumption practices and social/cultural identities. Theoretical approaches include Marxism, Postmodernism, and other economic and social critiques, and explore research methods to empirically investigate questions of culture. Students reflect on questions of social justice in relation to an increasingly materialistic society as they seek to become citizens prepared to "consume with a conscience."

CO 0240 Intercultural Communication3 Credits

Attributes: UDIV U.S. Diversity

Prerequisite: CO 0100 or CO 0102 or IL 0050.

This course deals with challenges to communication between people of different cultural backgrounds, emphasizing the ways communication practices reveal cultural values and the role of communication in creating and sustaining cultural identities. Students discuss how differences in value orientation, perception, thought patterns, and nonverbal behavior cause misunderstanding, tension, and conflict in business, education, and healthcare settings. Registration preference is given to Communication and International Studies majors.

CO 0241 Communication and Culture: East and West3 Credits

Attributes: WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: CO 0100 or CO 0102 or IL 0050.

This course examines the dynamics of culture and communication focusing on the East-West dyad. It helps students gain a better understanding of why and how cultural issues influence our communication. The course explores the East-West cultural similarities and differences in values, communication processes, cognition, and relationships. It will enhance students' intercultural awareness and sensitivity in our increasingly globalized society.

CO 0242 Alcohol, Addiction and Culture3 Credits

Attributes: HSSS Health Studies: Social Science

Prerequisite: CO 0100 or CO 0102.

From the time we are young children through our adult lives we are exposed to countless alcohol advertisements and engage in myriad alcohol-focused conversations with family, friends and coworkers. This course draws on perspectives from the personal to the institutional to critically examine the conversations on alcohol consumption, promotion, education and recovery from a health communication perspective. Through service learning opportunities with local high school seniors, students in the course reflects on the ways in which we talk about alcohol use, abuse, and alcoholism, and how that "talk" cultivates harmful and helpful perceptions and behaviors.

CO 0245 Identities, Discourse, and Social Change3 Credits

Attributes: BSFC Black Studies Focus Course, BSSS Black Studies: Social and Behavioral Sciences, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, UDIV U.S. Diversity, WSGC Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Component

Prerequisite: CO 0100.

Grounded in the premise that identities are inseparable from communication, this course focuses on the negotiation of, and the discursive practices pertaining to, social identities by exploring the intersections of ethnicity-race, gender, sexuality, social class, ability and age. Given that individual-group differences matter, this course addresses social issues and concerns by concentrating on how structures of power and privilege shape understandings of salient social identities within the United States. Additionally, this course will raise questions about the role of communication research in fostering social change.

CO 0246 Family Communication3 Credits

Attributes: UDIV U.S. Diversity, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

Prerequisite: CO 0100 or CO 0102.

In this course students come to understand how families are constituted through symbolic processes and interaction; explore the verbal and non-verbal communication behaviors that are developed and preferred in different kinds of families; learn various theories for understanding family interactions at the individual, dyadic, group, and systems levels; analyze family communication patterns using established theories and methods; connect family dynamics to social trends and processes including the roles of the mass media and popular culture; and explore ways culture, class, gender, and sexuality affect and are affected by family structures, roles, and communication patterns.

CO 0248 Health Communication3 Credits

Prerequisite: CO 0100 or CO 0102.

This course surveys the multidimensional processes used to create, maintain, and transform complex scientific information into everyday healthcare practices. A major emphasis is on the processes and complexities of communicating health information in a variety of settings (in hospitals, families, insurance companies, policy organizations, etc.) and through different channels (face-to-face, in medical records, through the mass media, etc.). We will study the verbal and non-verbal communication behaviors of providers, patients, families, insurers, and others in healthcare contexts, as well as health-related messages in the mass media, in order to understand effective and problematic communication about illness and health.

CO 0309 Research Projects in Communication: Capstone3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0100 or CO 0102, CO 0101, CO 0130, CO 0200 or CO 0220, senior standing, and at least one intermediate or advanced course in student's area of concentrated study.

This course allows students to demonstrate their expertise as communication scholars through discussion and evaluation of contemporary research in communication. The course examines qualitative and quantitative methodologies in understanding the research design process. As members of research teams, students design and conduct research projects related to their areas of concentrated study. This is the required major capstone course.

CO 0321 Communication Processes in Organizations: Negotiation3 Credits

Attributes: EVAP Environmental Studies: Applied Professional Skills

Prerequisites: CO 0220; junior or senior standing.

This course reviews and explores, through simulation and experiential learning, negotiation as a communication process in and among organizations. It focuses on core concepts and approaches to negotiation, and exercises the negotiative process in a contemporary context. In this course, which is open to majors and minors in communication and other disciplines related to the study of humans and their organizations in the work world, participants carry out individual and team work, and contribute on time and proportionately to team preparations and class simulations.

CO 0322 Leadership Communication3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0220; junior or senior standing.

This course examines the processes and complexities of being a leader in today's dynamic organizational environment. The course explores the leadership styles, traits, and communication skills required of effective leaders. In addition, theories of leadership and the impact of culture and ethics, both historically and currently, will be studied. This course uses a combination of lecture, discussion, individual and group learning opportunities, including interviews of professional and community leaders, as well as a written and oral research projects to aid in students' assimilation of the material.

CO 0323 Gender and Organizing3 Credits

Attributes: WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

Prerequisites: CO 0220; junior or senior standing.

Gender is central to how we organize our lives. The way we communicate about gender can enhance or undermine all of our relationships. The purpose of this seminar is to augment, or even change, our understanding of the relationship between gender, communication, and organizations. Specifically, the goal for this course is to use a combination of scholarly essays and journal articles as well as popular news media to examine critically topics such as femininity, masculinity, and sexuality within the following contexts: education, sports, politics/government, leadership, the military, and other professions and organizations.

CO 0324 Crisis Communication3 Credits

Attributes: HASM Humanitarian Action Minor Skills/Method Course

Prerequisites: CO 0200 or CO 0220; junior or senior standing.

This course discusses key concepts, principles, and best practices of crisis communication. Intersections with other areas of the communication field will also be addressed, including public relations and organizational and risk communication. Students will understand the role strategic communication, power, stakeholders, and organizational culture play during a crisis. This course analyzes case studies of previous crises and will ask students to provide their own plans and critical assessments of recent crises.

CO 0325 Organizational Communication and Advertising3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0220; junior or senior standing.

This course will highlight how organizations market, promote, and advertise their brands. The importance of advertising for organizations, consumers, and the U.S. economy will also be a central focus of this class. Furthermore, the critical roles of research, audience analysis, persuasion, and effective communication in altering consumers' perceptions will be explored from both theoretical and applied perspectives. The value of deconstructing ads from a consumer, brand manager, and advertiser's viewpoint will be stressed and explored. In addition, the historical and contemporary ethical implications of advertising, especially in health care and for children, will be closely examined.

CO 0329 Contemporary Topics in Organizational Communication3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0220; junior or senior standing.

This is an upper-level, undergraduate seminar for students in the Organizational Communication emphasis of the major. The course provides an opportunity to examine in depth particular theories of organizational communication, or to conduct research about communication in particular types of organizations. Emphasis is on contemporary theoretical and/or methodological approaches to the close analysis of interpersonal, group, and intercultural communication in organizational settings, or strategic communication practices of organizations with their external audiences/publics. Topics may include: Organizational Communication in the Global Economy; Communication in Healthcare Organizations; Gender and Communication in Organizations; and Communication in Organizational Crisis. Students may take this course up to two times with different topics.

CO 0331 American Media / American History3 Credits

Attributes: ENDE Digital Journalism Elective

Prerequisites: CO 0130; junior or senior standing.

This course examines the role of communication media in history, as well as the history of the media industries. From the earliest media of symbolic interaction to the newest technologies, the course examines why different media come into being, how they function in various societies, and their impact. Students come to understand how media have been influential in maintaining social order and as agents of change. The course pays attention to a variety of national media and international perspectives, with special emphasis on the evolution of American broadcasting.

CO 0332 Children as Media Consumers3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0130; junior or senior standing.

This course aims to provide a forum for advanced Communication students to explore the patterns of children's media consumption, focusing primarily on children's use of the so-called "screen media" (television, videogames, and the Internet), and to investigate the multi-faceted consequences -- both positive and negative, social and individual -- of children's media consumption. Students will draw upon contemporary theories of communication to assess the content of children's media and its "effects" on children as a particular segment of the audience. Students will develop an informed understanding of children as media consumers, advocating for the production of "quality" content in children's media.

CO 0333 News Media and Democracy3 Credits

Attributes: ENDE Digital Journalism Elective

Prerequisites: CO 0130; junior or senior standing.

The news media play an essential role in changing America and the world -- by bridging theory with practice, this course aims to equip students to become critical news consumers with a skilled understanding of how that works and politically literate about the big issues of our time. Through classic scholarly reflections as well as contemporary punditry, we will tackle the news media "critically" across three dimensions: learning about its indispensible function in mediating politics and democracy throughout history and today; studying and practicing the craft of opining writing and social advocacy; and evaluating and critiquing the performance of the press in these matters.

CO 0334 Comparative Media Systems3 Credits

Attributes: ENDE Digital Journalism Elective

Prerequisites: CO 0130; junior or senior standing.

This course provides a comparative overview of the economic and regulatory structure of media industries worldwide. By exploring the ways in which different institutional frameworks, structural factors, and audiences' agency affect mass communication within and across regional borders, this course offers a comprehensive picture of common and interdependent processes underlying the individual development of media industries in each region. Students learn about emerging market and research trends concerning international media. Issues related to free flow of messages, social responsibility, universal access, intellectual commons, participatory communication, developmental communication, and cultural diversity in the global exchange of media messages through discussion of current, real-life cases, as well as through design and execution of an original research project.

CO 0335 Globalization, Media, and Culture3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0130 or IL 0050; junior or senior standing.

Globalization, a complex and transformative process that influences our lives at every level, has produced the increased flow of goods, capital, people, knowledge, images, crime, pollutants, drugs, fashion, viruses, and beliefs across territorial and ideological boundaries of all kinds. This course focuses on the role of communication media (radio, television, film, computers) in the processes of globalization and examines the impact of globalization on cultural representations, cultural identity, and international relations.

CO 0336 Social Media3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0130; junior or senior standing.

At the turn of the millennium, social media was still an unknown term; today, it is inescapably altering the landscape of our world and our lives in complex ways. This course examines social media by historicizing what is timeless about it and charting its new frontiers for humankind. Through a mix of scholarly, journalistic, and professional industry readings on social media, we will explore how culture, community, and identity are being reshaped alongside politics, business, and (what was once called) the mass communication industry.

CO 0337 Visual Communication3 Credits

Attributes: GDCO Graphic Design: Communication

Prerequisite: CO 0130; junior or senior standing.

This course provides a broad introduction to the structure, conventions, and effects of visual communication with a theoretical emphasis on media ecology. The first half is devoted to understanding formal properties including examining the basics of vision, techniques for visual persuasion, and the language of cinematography and editing. The second half surveys more controversial issues like digital manipulation and violence and sex in media. Course material and assignments will be drawn from media domains including advertising, photo/video journalism, and video games. Students will read both theoretical contributions to and empirical investigations of the field.

CO 0338 Media Audiences3 Credits

Attributes: UDIV U.S. Diversity, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

Prerequisite: CO 0130; junior or senior standing.

This course has three related aims: to introduce the theoretical and academic study of media audiences, to introduce students to qualitative field research methods, and to prepare students to engage with the current media industry through an examination of applied audience research. Recognizing that the study of media audiences is an important theoretical as well as practical endeavor, we will consider how audiences have been studied historically, in the academy, and within media industries.

CO 0339 Topics in Media Theory and Criticism3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0130; junior or senior standing.

This course provides an opportunity to examine in depth particular media theories or to conduct careful media analysis and criticism. The course emphasizes contemporary theoretical and/or methodological approaches to the close analysis of television, radio, newspaper, the Internet, and/or magazine texts so as to understand the ways meaning is constructed and situated within the larger social context. Topics may include mass media and the public sphere; television criticism; sex, lies, and videos; and children and the media. Students may take this course up to two times with different topics.

CO 0340 Conflict Communication3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0200 or CO 0220; junior or senior standing.

Conflict is a natural part of human life that has a variety of potential consequences. Although conflict can be disruptive and destructive, it can also be constructive and lead to improved adjustment and better decisions. The course is designed to offer you opportunities to enhance and improve your techniques and skills in managing conflict and moving them in a productive direction. The course examines the dynamics of human conflict across a variety of settings from personal relationships to the workplace, with special attention to the communication processes that escalate, manage, and mediate conflict.

CO 0341 End of Life Communication3 Credits

Attributes: HSSS Health Studies: Social Science

Prerequisites: CO 0200 or CO 0220; junior or senior standing.

This course focuses on the only reality for every human being: death. However, in spite of its certainty, American culture tends to minimize or ignore discussions of death and provides little insight into effective communication strategies for healthcare providers, family members, friends, and lovers. The complexities of this unique communication will be assessed vis-à-vis an applied approach that includes a service-learning opportunity at a 51-bed hospice. In addition, the course will include self-reflection, autoethnography, an exploration of scholarly research in palliative communication, and scholarly interaction between undergraduate students in the classroom and the hospice setting.

CO 0342 Technoculture and Information Society3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0130; junior or senior standing.

This course explores phenomena, trends, and theories related to emerging information and communication technologies (ICTs), as well as relationships among those technologies, socio-economic structures, "old" media institutions, media users, and culture. Through a combination of theoretical and practical explorations that emphasize historical, ethical, and critical thinking, the course introduces students to academic and non-academic perspectives on new media.

CO 0343 Ethics and Medical Marketing Communication3 Credits

Attributes: HSSS Health Studies: Social Science

Prerequisites: CO 0220; junior or senior standing.

This course will explore the dialectical tensions between the need for safe and effective products/services and the expectations for corporations to generate profits and dividends for their stakeholders. This course will use an applied ethics lens to examine the organizational, marketing, advertising, and corporate communication to clients, consumers, vendors, and investors.The content and ethical implications of marketing communication (from a variety of organizational perspectives: healthcare, economics, cultural, etc.) on expected and unintended outcomes will also be discussed and analyzed.

CO 0344 Interracial Communication3 Credits

Attributes: BSFC Black Studies Focus Course, UDIV U.S. Diversity

Prerequisite: CO 0200; junior or senior standing.

This course focuses on the ways in which communication theories and research can improve the existing state of race relations in the United States. Throughout the course, up-to-date issues that surface locally and nationally in the media that illustrate the relevance of improved interracial communication will be addressed through class discussion and linked to course assignments. Using case studies to explore interracial exchanges in close relationships, at the workplace, and reflected in social media, students will link theory with practical applications in an effort to better understand interracial communication.

CO 0345 Relational Communication3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0200 or CO 0220; junior or senior standing.

Close relationships can bring us a great deal of joy, happiness, and love, but unfortunately they can also be sources of frustration, pain, and conflict. This course is designed to help us understand the critical role of communication in developing, maintaining, and terminating close relationships with romantic partners, friends, and family members. The course examines the most current research and theory on a variety of topics that are central to understanding and maintaining close relationships, with a focus on attraction, attachment, conflict, power, emotion, transgression, reconciliation, and termination.

CO 0346 Communication and Spirituality3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0200; junior or senior standing.

This course engages a critical understanding of the way in which spirituality is constructed through communication. Using the unique perspectives and empirical tools of the communication discipline, the course seeks to familiarize students with the variety of ways in which spirituality has been studied both within and outside of religion. Examining various contexts that engage spiritual discourses, from interpersonal communication settings to organizational, health and mass mediated settings, students reflect on the potential for spiritual discourses to transform individuals and society, and consider their own participation in such discourses.

CO 0347 Communication in Healthcare Organizations3 Credits

Attributes: HSSS Health Studies: Social Science

Prerequisites: CO 0248; junior or senior standing.

This course explores the organizational communication of modern U.S. healthcare organizations, including: Managed Care, Insurers, Healthcare Systems, and Medicare/Medicaid. The primary purposes of this course are to provide an understanding of how communication within, and from healthcare corporations impacts the organization, its employees, the health of its customers and U.S. healthcare delivery. This course will evaluate and explore the multidimensional processes involved in healthcare organizations and how communication is critical to their success or failure and to the health and well-being of their customers.

CO 0348 Risk Communication3 Credits

Attributes: EVAP Environmental Studies: Applied Professional Skills

Prerequisites: CO 0220; junior or senior standing.

Risk Communication examines the communication theories and research that underlie the study of risky behaviors and the development of effective responses to perceived risks. This course provides an understanding of how communication impacts our assessment of risk, critical thinking and policy making about risk prevention and response, and the creation of preventive programs and campaigns. Students will evaluate and explore the multidimensional processes involved in researching and responding to sustained risks or emergency situations, utilize communication theory to develop appropriate campaigns, and assess their success or failure. Topics may focus on health and environmental risks, security, or disaster response.

CO 0349 Special Topics (Shell)3 Credits

Prerequisites: CO 0200, CO 0220, CO 0240; junior or senior standing.

This course focuses on a specific context where social identities are negotiated through particular discursive practices, emphasizing the verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors that are appropriate in this context and through which people constitute and perform their identities. The course examines symbolic practices and communication norms in families, self-help groups, television talk shows, cyber communities, social movements, and genders/sexualities, using approaches such as symbolic convergence theory, social constructivism, ethnography of communication, and conversational analysis. Students may take this course up to two times with different topics.

CO 0397 Independent Study1-3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

This course allows students to thoroughly investigate communication concepts, theories, or issues presented in a previously completed communication course. Independent study does not substitute for any other required course(s) in the communication program and students' investigations must be scholarly in intent. An independent study may be taken no more than twice. Enrollment by permission only.

CO 0399 Internship1-3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

Communication internships provide students with first-hand knowledge about the field of work, allow them to experience new professional activities and relationships, help them apply conceptual knowledge and skills in communication in the work environment, and allow them to experience the problems and successes of efficiently and effectively communicating within a complex organization. One three-credit internship course can be used toward the major. Students may take an internship twice for credit. Students must have a GPA of 2.8 or higher.

CO 0400 Communication Philosophies, Theories, and Research Traditions3 Credits

This class is designed to provide an introduction for the graduate student to the diverse and voluminous research in the area of human communication. As such, it covers an extremely wide range of intellectual, scientific, and historical material. It is a survey course, but we will deal with selected areas in depth. This course will not only introduce the areas of human communication theory and research, but it will also introduce the process of theorizing and thinking about communication. Therefore, the nature of theory, research, and intellectual inquiry is an important part of this course.

CO 0410 Perspectives and Theories in Organizational Communication3 Credits

This course is intended to highlight organizations and how they are created, maintained and changed through social interaction. Communicating by organizational members is essentially organizing. The course examines organizational communication from both functional and constructivist perspectives.

CO 0420 Communication Research Design and Methodologies3 Credits

A detailed review of research methods and procedures relevant to measuring the phenomena and characteristics of human communication behavior in a variety of contexts and relationships. Quantitative, qualitative, and critical approaches are reviewed and practiced in course projects. Applications of research methods to describing and evaluating communication are studied.

CO 0430 Written Communication3 Credits

Explores how written communication by its very nature is drastically different from verbal and other nonverbal forms of communication. Considers the effect a printable form of communication has on the message, the sender and receiver, and the potential legal issues associated with written communication. This course focuses on the impact of written messages for intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, organizational, intercultural, and mass media communication. Examines the historical transformation in content, style, and perception from letters, memos, and notes to the evolving electronic formats for written communication including: e-mails, blogs, chat rooms, e-networking/e-cultures, wikis, etc.

CO 0431 Media Law and Institutions3 Credits

The course concentrates on the legal and economic environment of U.S. mass media. Topics include examination of major doctrines of media law, organization and operation of individual media industries, the economic structure of U.S. media markets, the role of media watchdogs and advocacy organizations, as well as media users' forms of collective action. The course's content is approached through an institutional analysis perspective, intended to facilitate students' understanding of institutions as dynamic points of confluence for organizations, norms, and individual agents. As part of the course's requirements, students conduct a research project exploring recent developments in media regulation and/or decision-making processes within one of the major media institutions covered during the semester.

CO 0440 Ethics and Communication3 Credits

Coursework includes a comprehensive overview of the development of ethics from ancient to contemporary thought and practices. Emphasis is placed on the ethical agenda, problems, and responsibilities of contemporary organizations in diverse cultures. Case studies and student research focus on contemporary issues in the ethical communicative performance. The relationship between Jesuit philosophy and applied communication work in organizations is also explored.

CO 0448 Health Risk Communication3 Credits

This is a one-week, predominantly face-to-face course that includes online interactions. This course examines the theories and research that underlie the study of health risk communication and behaviors. The primary purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of how communication impacts our assessment of health risk behaviors, critical thinking, the creation of preventive programs, and outcomes. This course will evaluate and explore the multidimensional processes involved in researching the communication of risky behaviors and how organizations can utilize health communication theory to develop appropriate campaigns and assess their success or failure.

CO 0497A Gender and Organizing3 Credits

Gender is central to how we organize our lives. The way we communicate about gender can enhance or undermine all of our relationships. The purpose of this seminar is to augment, or even change, our understanding of the relationship between gender, communication, and organizations. Specifically, the goal for this course is to use a combination of scholarly essays and journal articles as well as popular news media to examine critically topics such as femininity, masculinity, and sexuality within the following contexts: education, sports, politics/government, leadership, the military, and other professions and organizations. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0323.

CO 0497B Risk Communication3 Credits

Risk Communication examines the communication theories and research that underlie the study of risky behaviors and the development of effective responses to perceived risks. This course provides an understanding of how communication impacts our assessment of risk, critical thinking and policy making about risk prevention and response, and the creation of preventive programs and campaigns. Students will evaluate and explore the multidimensional processes involved in researching and responding to sustained risks or emergency situations, utilize communication theory to develop appropriate campaigns, and assess their success or failure. Topics may focus on health and environmental risks, security, or disaster response. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0348.

CO 0497C Technoculture and Information Society3 Credits

This course explores phenomena, trends, and theories related to emerging information and communication technologies (ICTs), as well as relationships among those technologies, socio-economic structures, "old" media institutions, media users, and culture. Through a combination of theoretical and practical explorations that emphasize historical, ethical, and critical thinking, the course introduces students to academic and non-academic perspectives on new media. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0342.

CO 0497D End of Life Communication3 Credits

This course focuses on the only reality for every human being: death. However, in spite of its certainty, American culture tends to minimize or ignore discussions of death and provides little insight into effective communication strategies for healthcare providers, family members, friends, and lovers. The complexities of this unique communication will be assessed vis-à-vis an applied approach that includes a service-learning opportunity at a 51-bed hospice. In addition, the course will include self-reflection, autoethnography, an exploration of scholarly research in palliative communication, and scholarly interaction between students in the classroom and the hospice setting. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0341.

CO 0497E Comparative Media Systems3 Credits

This course provides a comparative overview of the economic and regulatory structure of media industries worldwide. By exploring the ways in which different institutional frameworks, structural factors, and audiences' agency affect mass communication within and across regional borders, this course offers a comprehensive picture of common and interdependent processes underlying the individual development of media industries in each region. Students learn about emerging market and research trends concerning international media. Issues related to free flow of messages, social responsibility, universal access, intellectual commons, participatory communication, developmental communication, and cultural diversity in the global exchange of media messages through discussion of current, real-life cases, as well as through design and execution of an original research project. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0334.

CO 0497F Organizational Communication and Advertising3 Credits

This course will highlight how organizations market, promote, and advertise their brands. The importance of advertising for organizations, consumers, and the U.S. economy will also be a central focus of this class. Furthermore, the critical roles of research, audience analysis, persuasion, and effective communication in altering consumers' perceptions will be explored from both theoretical and applied perspectives. The value of deconstructing ads from a consumer, brand manager, and advertiser's viewpoint will be stressed and explored. In addition, the historical and contemporary ethical implications of advertising, especially in health care and for children, will be closely examined. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0325.

CO 0497G Globalization, Media, and Culture3 Credits

Globalization, a complex and transformative process that influences our lives at every level, has produced the increased flow of goods, capital, people, knowledge, images, crime, pollutants, drugs, fashion, viruses, and beliefs across territorial and ideological boundaries of all kinds. This course focuses on the role of communication media (radio, television, film, computers) in the processes of globalization and examines the impact of globalization on cultural representations, cultural identity, and international relations. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0335.

CO 0497H Visual Communication3 Credits

This course provides a broad introduction to the structure, conventions, and effects of visual communication with a theoretical emphasis on media ecology. The first half is devoted to understanding formal properties including examining the basics of vision, techniques for visual persuasion, and the language of cinematography and editing. The second half surveys more controversial issues like digital manipulation and violence and sex in media. Course material and assignments will be drawn from media domains including advertising, photo/video journalism, and video games. Students will read both theoretical contributions to and empirical investigations of the field. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0337.

CO 0497I Media Audiences3 Credits

This course has three related aims: to introduce the theoretical and academic study of media audiences, to introduce students to qualitative field research methods, and to prepare students to engage with the current media industry through an examination of applied audience research. Recognizing that the study of media audiences is an important theoretical as well as practical endeavor, we will consider how audiences have been studied historically, in the academy, and within media industries. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0338.

CO 0497J Crisis Communication3 Credits

This course discusses key concepts, principles, and best practices of crisis communication. Intersections with other areas of the communication field will also be addressed, including public relations and organizational and risk communication. Students will understand the role strategic communication, power, stakeholders, and organizational culture play during a crisis. This course analyzes case studies of previous crises and will ask students to provide their own plans and critical assessments of recent crises. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0324.

CO 0497K Ethics and Medical Marketing Communication3 Credits

This course will explore the dialectical tensions between the need for safe and effective products/services and the expectations for corporations to generate profits and dividends for their stakeholders. This course will use an applied ethics lens to examine the organizational, marketing, advertising, and corporate communication to clients, consumers, vendors, and investors.The content and ethical implications of marketing communication (from a variety of organizational perspectives: healthcare, economics, cultural, etc.) on expected and unintended outcomes will also be discussed and analyzed. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0343.

CO 0497L Social Media3 Credits

At the turn of the millennium, social media was still an unknown term; today, it is inescapably altering the landscape of our world and our lives in complex ways. This course examines social media by historicizing what is timeless about it and charting its new frontiers for humankind. Through a mix of scholarly, journalistic, and professional industry readings on social media, we will explore how culture, community, and identity are being reshaped alongside politics, business, and (what was once called) the mass communication industry. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0336.

CO 0497M Communication Processes in Organizations: Negotiation3 Credits

This course reviews and explores, through simulation and experiential learning, negotiation as a communication process in and among organizations. It focuses on core concepts and approaches to negotiation, and exercises the negotiative process in a contemporary context. In this course, which is open to majors and minors in communication and other disciplines related to the study of humans and their organizations in the work world, participants carry out individual and team work, and contribute on time and proportionately to team preparations and class simulations. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0321.

CO 0497N Relational Communication3 Credits

Close relationships can bring us a great deal of joy, happiness, and love, but unfortunately they can also be sources of frustration, pain, and conflict. This course is designed to help us understand the critical role of communication in developing, maintaining, and terminating close relationships with romantic partners, friends, and family members. The course examines the most current research and theory on a variety of topics that are central to understanding and maintaining close relationships, with a focus on attraction, attachment, conflict, power, emotion, transgression, reconciliation, and termination. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0345.

CO 0497O Conflict Communication3 Credits

Conflict is a natural part of human life that has a variety of potential consequences. Although conflict can be disruptive and destructive, it can also be constructive and lead to improved adjustment and better decisions. The course is designed to offer you opportunities to enhance and improve your techniques and skills in managing conflict and moving them in a productive direction. The course examines the dynamics of human conflict across a variety of settings from personal relationships to the workplace, with special attention to the communication processes that escalate, manage, and mediate conflict. Undergraduate equivalent: CO 0340.

CO 0497P Interracial Communication3 Credits

This course explores current trends in literature on the topics of race relations, communication styles and patterns, communication theory, and the social construction of race along with its influence on how individuals from different races communicate. Throughout the course, up-to-date issues that surface locally and nationally in the media that illustrate the relevance of improved interracial communication will be addressed through class discussion and linked to course assignments. Using case studies to explore interracial exchanges in close relationships, at the workplace, and reflected in social media, students will link theory with practical applications in an effort to better understand interracial communication.

CO 0498 Communication Practicum3 Credits

Communication Practicum is a semester-long internship or other type of placement carried out by graduate students in Communication in local, national or inter-national contexts. These placements are determined in conjunction with, and carried out under the supervision of, a faculty member. Practicums allow students to gain professional experience; where possible these activities should relate directly to thesis projects and other long-term academic interests. Students must commit to a minimum of 120 hours at an approved work site (internships cannot be done at a student's place of employment) and are also responsible for completing additional academic requirements.

CO 0500 Interpersonal Communication3 Credits

This course is a critical examination of the major theories of interpersonal communication and an exploration of interpersonal communication research in relational and organizational contexts. Student projects will use social science research methods to examine factors influencing interpersonal communication such as language, perception, nonverbal behavior, power, status, and gender roles.

CO 0502 Small Group and Team Communication3 Credits

This course is a study of the communication dimensions and dynamics of small groups, teams, and networks of organizational actors. Coursework and projects focus on interpersonal processes and structures for tasking and relating effectively in organizational settings. The special characteristics of virtual team and technology-enhanced decision-making work are investigated.

CO 0522 Communication and Organizational Leadership3 Credits

This course focuses on the communication behaviors that constitute leadership. Models explore interpersonal influence, power in organizations, leading decision-making teams and task-oriented groups, and developing situational leadership skills. Early and contemporary research perspectives on leadership are reviewed and critically analyzed. Student projects include case studies and reviews of role-model leaders.

CO 0524 Negotiation and Conflict Management: Communication Approaches3 Credits

This course explores a selection of conflict situations with particular emphasis on organizational and community settings. Theoretical exploration focuses on the nature of conflict, and negotiation and dialogue as communication processes. The course privileges win-win and dialogic approaches and provides experiential learning in simulations in which teams of students negotiate detailed and practicable outcomes for resolving contemporary organizational and societal problems.

CO 0528 Professional Rhetoric and Presentations3 Credits

This course focuses on developing and practicing written and oral presentations for professional settings. Coursework includes reviewing strategies and tactics for enhancing interpersonal and social influence through the development of sound reasoning skills, audience analysis techniques, use of source materials, effective extemporaneous delivery, and the appropriate use of technological support within the organizational setting. Additional applications are considered for scholarly, scientific, policy, and public arenas. The course requires the preparation, practice, and critical assessment of several written and oral presentations.

CO 0530 Media Theory and Criticism3 Credits

This course introduces graduate students in Communication to the study of media in the US. It focuses on the major theoretical trajectories that have shaped the field, empirical research that has emerged as canonical, and contemporary critical approaches that inform not just how we study media as scholars, but also how we understand media as consumers.

CO 0532 Nonprofit Media3 Credits

This course focuses on public relations, advertising and marketing strategies for nonprofit and public service organizations. The course begins with a broad overview of media industries and the changing landscape of media technologies and then considers how nonprofit and other public service organizations can best leverage resources to effectively communicate with intended audiences. Both theoretical and practical, this course provides graduate students with historical understandings of how media industries are organized and how not for profit organizations interface with profit-driven media businesses. Special attention is paid to how social media platforms and other digital technologies impact communication strategies.

CO 0535 Globalization, Communication, and Culture3 Credits

Globalization has produced the increased flow of goods, capital, people, knowledge, images, crime, pollutants, drugs, fashion, viruses, and beliefs across territorial and ideological boundaries of all kinds. This course is focused on organizational communication in a global economic environment and helps students prepare for cross-cultural management issues, decision-making for multinational organizational effectiveness, and a consideration of global economic and labor issues.

CO 0537 New Media Studies3 Credits

The digital and social media that have emerged in the past decade are reshaping our world in profound ways - this course explores those developments in light of both extended history and the contemporary moment. Through a mix of scholarly and journalistic readings, we will inquire into the ways in which culture, community, and identity are undergoing change alongside marketing, politics, and the "mass" communication industries. Our focus will include a wide variety of new media platforms, practices, and issues drawn from social networking, mobile, and online content, as we cultivate a critical lens on society's increasing digitalization (and its discontents.

CO 0539 Advertising and Consumer Communication3 Credits

This course takes a critical look at the intersection of consumer culture, advertising, marketing and communication. This course also considers the history of advertising, marketing and public relations in the US as a starting point for better understanding of contemporary practices in these fields. Central in this examination is a consideration of how race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality often map (and are mapped onto) specific consumption patterns. Further, this course examines how advertising and related communication practices happen within a specific political-economic environment and how technology is quickly changing how theory translates into practice in these fields. While advertising, marketing and public relations are undoubtedly a part of our consumer culture, this course is not exclusively about how to "do" these activities, but rather how these communication practices impact our culture. Finally this course will ask students to critically reflect on consumption in terms of global, environmental and labor concerns.

CO 0540 Intercultural Communication3 Credits

This course examines the relationship between communication behavior and cultural factors such as nationality, ethnicity, race, gender, class, sexuality, and religion. We will focus on cross-cultural sense-making, relationships, problem-solving, and organizing with particular application to business, education, and health care encounters. The course reviews the social science research of variations in normative communication behavior, as well as the theoretical approaches to understanding the relationship between worldview/cultural values and preferred communication practices. Examples will be used from a variety of nations, as well as those within the diverse cultural landscape of contemporary United States.

CO 0545 Race, Identity, and Representation3 Credits

Rooted in a constitutive approach to communication, this course advances the notion that identities are not bound within the self, but rather, are socially negotiated through communication practices and are situated firmly in cultural and historical settings. Specifically, this course examines how racial identities emerge, reform, and are redirected through discourse. In addition to exploring how racial categorizations are socially constructed, this course attends to contemporary representations of race within media, education, and health care systems. Further, students in this course will interrogate social issues involving structural inequality, privilege, power, and hegemony.

CO 0547 Healthcare Organizational Communication3 Credits

This course examines the processes and complexities of modern healthcare organizations (hospitals, nursing homes, insurers, associations, pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers, non-profits, marketing, advertising, and PR firms, provider education institutions, etc.). The primary purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of how communication within, to, and from healthcare organizations impacts the company, its employees, stakeholders, customers, federal and local governments, and U.S. healthcare delivery. This course will evaluate and explore the multidimensional processes utilized by healthcare organizations and how communication is critical to their successes or failures and to the health and well being of their customers.

CO 0548 Health Communication3 Credits

Communicating to people about health has become oneof the most active areas of communication research and practice. This course focuses on the theory and practice of communication in health settings. Topics covered include doctor-patient communication, health campaigns, effects of media on health, intercultural issues in health communication and risk communication in relation to health practices.

CO 0559 Special Topics in Communication Research3 Credits

This course is taught when a particular faculty member has a compelling proposal for a topic that has been approved by the department. Preference will be given to topics related to contemporary issues or to a current faculty research project.

CO 0560 Thesis Proposal3 Credits

This course operates as an independent study experience under the supervision of a faculty advisor and the secondary supervision of one additional faculty reader. Each proposal and thesis should have a total of two readers, the faculty advisor and one additional reader from the Communication Department who has taught the student. At the student's request, a faculty member from another department who has taught the student in a graduate course could serve as a third reader. In unusual circumstances (e.g., a conflict between the faculty advisor and the second reader) a third reader would be assigned by the Graduate Program Director. The thesis will be orally presented to the faculty.

CO 0561 Thesis Research3 Credits

This course operates as an independent study experience under the supervision of a faculty advisor and the secondary supervision of one additional faculty reader. Each proposal and thesis should have a total of two readers, the faculty advisor and one additional reader from the Communication Department who has taught the student. At the student's request, a faculty member from another department who has taught the student in a graduate course could serve as a third reader. In unusual circumstances (e.g., a conflict between the faculty advisor and the second reader) a third reader would be assigned by the Graduate Program Director. The thesis will be orally presented to the faculty.

CO 0562 Continuing Thesis Research3 Credits

CO 0570 Project Proposal3 Credits

This course operates as an independent study experience under the supervision of a faculty advisor and the secondary supervision of one additional faculty reader. Each proposal and project should have a total of two readers, the faculty advisor and one additional reader from the Communication Department who has taught the student. At the student's request, a faculty member from another department who has taught the student in a graduate course could serve as a third reader. In unusual circumstances (e.g., a conflict between the faculty advisor and the second reader) a third reader would be assigned by the Graduate Program Director. The project will be presented to the faculty and should have some kind of public presentation or impact.

CO 0571 Independent Project3 Credits

This course operates as an independent study experience under the supervision of a faculty advisor and the secondary supervision of one additional faculty reader. Each proposal and project should have a total of two readers, the faculty advisor and one additional reader from the Communication Department who has taught the student. At the student's request, a faculty member from another department who has taught the student in a graduate course could serve as a third reader. In unusual circumstances (e.g., a conflict between the faculty advisor and the second reader) a third reader would be assigned by the Graduate Program Director. The project will be presented to the faculty and should have some kind of public presentation or impact.

CO 0572 Continuing Project3 Credits

CO 0598 Independent Study3 Credits

Prerequisites: Graduate Director's approval and a communication faculty member's sponsorship.

This course allows students to thoroughly investigate communication concepts, theories, or issues presented in a previously completed graduate communication course. Independent study does not substitute for any other required course(s) in the graduate program and students' investigations must be scholarly in intent. An independent study may be taken only once.