Social Work, BSW (SWRK)

SWRK 1101 Social Work Essentials I1 Credit

This course will be designed as six modules covered over two semesters: 1) What it means to be a social worker and the self-reflection and relational skills required, 2) professional ethics and boundaries in social work practice, 3) an overview of the social work program at Fairfield University (guidelines and expectations), 4) the role of community-engaged learning in preparing social workers, 5) what it means to be a helper (engaging diversity and difference in practice), and 6) exploring career pathways in social work (job market, graduate school). Asynchronous and synchronous activities will guide student access, engagement, processing, and reflection.

SWRK 1102 Social Work Essentials II1 Credit

This course will be designed as six modules covered over two semesters: 1) What it means to be a social worker and the self-reflection and relational skills required, 2) professional ethics and boundaries in social work practice, 3) an overview of the social work program at Fairfield University (guidelines and expectations), 4) the role of community-engaged learning in preparing social workers, 5) what it means to be a helper (engaging diversity and difference in practice), and 6) exploring career pathways in social work (job market, graduate school). Asynchronous and synchronous activities will guide student access, engagement, processing, and reflection.

SWRK 2400 Social Work: An Introduction3 Credits

Attributes: HSSS Health Studies: Social Science

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

This course provides an overview of the social work profession, including the knowledge, values and skills that provide the foundation for generalist social work practice. Students are introduced to the systems and ecological framework through which social workers view the complex nature of human and social problems. There is a focus on fields of practice, methods and models of intervention, and the historical mission of the profession to advance human rights, social justice and to provide services to vulnerable and oppressed populations. Crosslisted with SOCI 2400. Previously SK 0192.

SWRK 2410 History of Social Welfare3 Credits

Attributes: ASSO American Studies: Sociology, HSSS Health Studies: Social Science, PJST Peace and Justice Studies

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

This course explores the evolution of social welfare in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on the social, political, legal, economic, and philosophical forces that have forged American social welfare policy and helped shape the profession of social work. Exploration of historical events, as well as divisions in American Society, regarding social justice and issues of class, race, ethnicity, religion, and gender will provide a framework through which to view current controversies, including the economic and social climate for groups such as the working poor and undocumented immigrants. In addition, the course will provide historical context to contemporary issues by exploring the ongoing implications and ethical merit of social policies such as the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Policy (DACA), and the current separation of parents and children at the United States southern border. Crosslisted with SOCI 2410. Previously SK 0193.

SWRK 3301 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I3 Credits

Corequisite: SWRK 3303.

Prerequisite: SWRK 2400.

The purpose of this course is to engage students in an exploration of human behavior and the impact of the environment on individuals as they develop through the lifespan. It examines the biopsychosocial and spiritual aspects of human development with a further emphasis on how factors such as poverty, discrimination, racism, culture, gender, health status, and sexual orientation, affect the developmental process. Exploration of research, case examples and self-reflection, will deepen students ability to conceptualize the processes of assessment, intervention, and the person-in-environment perspective across systems with diverse populations. This course, the first in sequence, will cover human reproduction through adolescence. Previously SK 0301.

SWRK 3302 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II3 Credits

Corequisite: SWRK 3304.

Prerequisite: SWRK 2410.

The purpose of this course is to engage students in an exploration of human behavior and the impact of the environment on individuals as they develop through the lifespan. It examines the biopsychosocial and spiritual aspects of human development with a further emphasis on how factors such as poverty, discrimination, racism, culture, gender, health status, and sexual orientation, affect the developmental process. Exploration of research, case examples and self-reflection, will deepen students ability to conceptualize the processes of assessment, intervention, and the person-in-environment perspective across systems with diverse populations. This course, the second in sequence, will cover young adulthood through end-of-life issues. Previously SK 0302.

SWRK 3303 Social Policy and Social Justice4 Credits

The course will explore policy within the context of social, economic, and environmental justice issues including oppression, poverty, income inequality, food insecurity, immigration, healthcare disparity, pollution, criminal justice, and other issues that affect individual and social well-being. The impact of social policies and social programs on vulnerable populations will also be explored. Students will understand and identify with the role of social workers as agents of change in developing and advocating for social policies that meet the needs of clients. This course will include service learning in a community setting and will culminate in a project that will evaluate policy issues that arise throughout the semester. Previously SK 0303.

SWRK 3304 Research in Social Work Practice4 Credits

Scientific inquiry which tests theory and supports the evidence base of social work intervention is a critical component of social work education. The research course introduces students to all aspects of the research process, including forming hypotheses, framing research questions, conceptualizing and conducting a literature review, identifying variables, quantitative and qualitative measurement, sampling, data collection, coding, data analysis, and communication of results. Students will also learn to include and be sensitive to ethical guidelines in social work research and the importance of a culturally competent approach to research. This course will include service learning, and culminates with a research project that poses questions for scientific inquiry in relation to the service learning experience. Previously SK 0304.

SWRK 3311 Leadership for Interdisciplinary Health Professionals3 Credits

This course is designed to expose students in the fields of public health and social work to conceptual frameworks through which to view leadership. Students will explore the key values and personal attributes that guide the leadership process. Students will engage in dynamic exercises and collaborative work to better understand leadership principles and work to apply these concepts to communities in their fields of study. The students will have the opportunity to reflect on leadership qualities relevant to their profession as well as personal leadership qualities that guide the relationship with vulnerable populations. Previously SK 0311.

SWRK 4305 Generalist Social Work Practice I3 Credits

This is the first of two courses in the generalist practice and methods curriculum. This course immerses students in the fundamental values, ethics, skills, and knowledge that are the foundation of generalist social work practice. The course will cover the NASW Code of Ethics and Standards with a strong focus on cultural competence and a strengths-based approach to practice with individuals and families. Students will be encouraged to explore the profession while developing direct practice skills, such as developing the helping relationship, assessment, conceptualizing problems, assessing strengths, using research to inform practice, setting goals and contracting, choosing and evaluating intervention strategies, and evaluating practice. Students are expected to apply knowledge of human behavior, social policy, research, and practice with diverse and vulnerable populations into the practice situation. Previously SK 0305.

SWRK 4306 Generalist Social Work Practice II3 Credits

Prerequisite: SWRK 4305.

This is the second of two courses in the generalist practice and methods curriculum. This course further immerses students in the fundamental values, ethics, skills, and knowledge that are the foundation of generalist social work practice. There will be a focus on increasing students understanding of the helping process and the development of generalist practice knowledge and skills. There will be emphasis on the importance of applying theoretical and empirical knowledge when choosing intervention strategies. Students will continue to engage in an ongoing and reflective process of exploring and evaluating their own practice and will also reflect on their "use of self" with clients and in the supervisory process. It is expected that students will integrate prior learning from previous courses and in current fieldwork concerning human behavior, social policy, research, service delivery, and practice with diverse and vulnerable populations across systems with specific focus on group work and community practice. Previously SK 0306.

SWRK 4307 Integrative Field Practicum Seminar I2 Credits

The course is the first of two field seminar courses and is taken in conjunction with Field Practicum I. The purpose of this course is to acclimate students to field work and to prepare them for social work practice with diverse and vulnerable populations. The course will focus on the knowledge, values, and skills required to identify as a professional social worker and to practice in the field with competence, including the professional use of self, the application of social work values and ethics in social work practice, the use of communication skills, engaging in the supervisory process, social worker roles in community practice, understanding the organizational context of practice, exploring research to inform evidence-based practice, understanding and protecting clients confidentiality, and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. The seminar is designed to support students learning and integration of knowledge as they build practice skills. Students are supported through the use of small group process oriented interactions, self-reflection, role-play, case discussion, and experiential exercises. Students are also encouraged to share questions, concerns, and learning needs in regards to their field experience. Previously SK 0307.

SWRK 4308 Integrative Field Practicum Seminar II2 Credits

Prerequisite: SWRK 4307.

This second seminar course is process-oriented and is designed to provide students the opportunity to discuss, analyze, and integrate theory within their field and coursework learning while demonstrating their ability to apply multiple sources of knowledge and skills to generalist social work practice. The seminar provides the opportunity for further learning and consolidation of knowledge and skills, through self-reflection, case discussion, process recordings, presentations, experiential exercises, and a comprehensive case study paper. Previously SK 0308.

SWRK 4951 Field Practicum I4 Credits

As the "signature pedagogy" in the education of professional social workers, field learning is integral to the program and needs to instill in students the ability "to think, to perform, and to act with integrity" (Shulman). The Field Practicum is designed to provide students with a generalist perspective for social work practice, through supervised experience with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Provided in collaboration with human and social service agencies, the field practicum will preparation students for professional practice in social work. Previously SK 0309.

SWRK 4952 Field Practicum II4 Credits

As the "signature pedagogy" in the education of professional social workers, field learning is integral to the program and needs to instill in students the ability "to think, to perform, and to act with integrity" (Shulman). The Field Practicum is designed to provide students with a generalist perspective for social work practice, through supervised experience with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Provided in collaboration with human and social service agencies, the field practicum will preparation students for professional practice in social work. Previously SK 0310.