Film, Television, and Media Arts (FTM)

FTM 0010 Introduction to Film Studies3 Credits

Attributes: ENPC Digital Journalism Production Component, VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

Fee: $55 Materials Fee

This course explores the fundamentals of film form (including narrative modes, visual design, performance styles, editing, and sound design), and the relationship between a film's style and its overall meaning. By learning how to "read" film as a text and utilize sophisticated cinematic language, you will begin to critically understand film as both an art form and a product of culture. Each week's meetings will include lecture, discussion, and a separate, dedicated screening of a feature film.

FTM 0011 Introduction to Film and Video Production3 Credits

Attributes: ENPC Digital Journalism Production Component, VPC2 Visual and Performing Arts Core: Applied Course

This course introduces and familiarizes students with all the production tools of the Film, Television, and Media Arts program, including: cameras; lighting instruments and grip equipment packages; audio equipment, including microphones, audio recorders, mixers, windscreens, etc. Each class consists of two parts -- an instruction and discussion of the theoretical elements of the class topics, and a hands-on demonstration of the theory just presented. The course features multiple practicum assignments designed to provide a thorough learning experience and to illustrate camera, lighting and audio theory.

FTM 0090 Production Practicum in Film, Television, and Media Arts1 Credit

Film, Television, and Media Arts majors must take this course for at least one semester during each of their freshman, sophomore and junior years. They will participate in a variety of film, television or radio productions beyond those assigned within individual courses, including: regular programs on the Ham Channel or WVOF; independent student films; student TV broadcasts of annual campus events; Media Center productions or broadcasts; or senior capstone projects. Enrollment by permission only.

FTM 0101 American Cinema: History and Analysis3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, GDFT Graphic Design: Film and Television, VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

American cinema has evolved from its origins as a technological novelty at the end of the 19th century to become a key component of a multibillion-dollar industry that profoundly influences popular culture in the United States and around the world. This course examines important American films of the past 100 years and the technological, economic, and cultural developments that have influenced their creation, along with the theoretical concepts necessary for their analysis.

FTM 0102 American Television: History and Analysis3 Credits

Attributes: ASGW American Studies: Gateway, GDFT Graphic Design: Film and Television, VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

An introduction to the study of television in the United States, this course reviews the historical roots of television content and technology and its relationship to radio and film, and its evolution new media platforms. Students examine the evolution of the many program types found in broadcast and cable television, explore their narrative conventions, and define criteria for analyzing story, structure, formats, performance, and production values.

FTM 0103 World Cinema3 Credits

Attributes: ENDE Digital Journalism Elective, GDFT Graphic Design: Film and Television, VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

This course surveys the development of world cinema with a particular emphasis on its canonical texts. We will examine the cinematic medium in its various global, cultural, and social contexts by studying key film movements and styles, including German Expressionism, Soviet Montage, Italian Neo-Realism, various "new wave" cinemas, and certain global film movements. We will also study the development of popular national genres and evaluate the relationship between art, commerce, and taste as it pertains to the distribution and U.S. reception of world cinema. Students will gain factual knowledge and learn to analyze and critically evaluate points of view that may not be their own.

FTM 0104 Documentary Cinema3 Credits

Attributes: GDFT Graphic Design: Film and Television, VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

This course surveys the historical, political, social and cultural significance of non-fiction (documentary) storytelling traditions in the U.S. and abroad. Students will study canonical and independently produced documentaries directed by domestic and international filmmakers to deepen their overall understanding of the technological and aesthetic contributions that national cinemas have contributed to nonfiction filmmaking. Major themes to be discussed are tradition vs. modernization, colonialism, religion, cross cultural relationships, class, gender, ethnicity, nationalism, the human condition, hegemony, and displacement. Students will gain factual knowledge and learn to analyze and critically evaluate points of view that may not be their own.

FTM 0108 Sports Broadcasting and Remote Television Production3 Credits

Attributes: ENPC Digital Journalism Production Component, VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

This course introduces students to the principles and practice of the world of sports broadcasting. Topics include the history of the industry, its developing techniques, the aesthetic and narrative structure of television sportscasting, its economic impact on the industry, media law and ethics applied to the sports world, and its significant place within the general broadcast world.

FTM 0120 Beginning Screenwriting for Film and Television3 Credits

Attributes: VPC2 Visual and Performing Arts Core: Applied Course

This beginning course introduces students to screenwriting by developing their understanding of visual storytelling for short documentary films, fiction films, and the television sitcom. The main goal of the course is to develop creative capacities in storytelling and creative written expression while introducing students to fundamental principles of conventional fiction and non-fiction screenwriting. This course utilizes lecture, discussion, screenings, readings, and reflective essay writing to grapple with issues of narrative structure, characterization, conflict, aesthetics, and the politics and ethics of writing as well as other related topics. Students will participate in regular writing workshops in which fellow classmates will respond to their work.

FTM 0130 Nonlinear Editing for Film and Television3 Credits

Fee: $55 Materials Fee

Prerequisites: FTM 0010, FTM 0011.

This course examines the technical and theoretical conventions of film and video editing that have emerged during more than one hundred years of motion picture and television history. Through readings, discussions and lectures, as well as editing assignments, students will explore how to make meaning through the assembly of images and sound. Students will also gain experience with post-production software, including Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Audition, and DaVinci Resolve.

FTM 0131 Intermediate Film Production3 Credits

Prerequisites: FTM 0010, FTM 0011.

This course introduces FTM majors to the major elements and principles of film, television and media production, and its three stages of preproduction, production, and post-production. Each student authors and collaboratively produces short narrative, documentary, and experimental pieces on a common theme.

FTM 0201 Filmmaker Studies3 Credits

Prerequisite: FTM 0010.

Each semester that it is offered, this course takes up the study of one or more individual filmmakers - primarily directors - and surveys that person's (or pairs' or group's) body of work, examining major themes, techniques, motifs, topics, collaborations. In so doing, it seeks to measure and evaluate his or her contribution to the history and craft of film. Filmmakers have included Alfred Hitchcock, Clint Eastwood, Quentin Tarantino, Women Directors, and Ang Lee. May be taken twice.

FTM 0201A Filmmaker Studies: Women Directors3 Credits

Attributes: ASVP American Studies: Visual and Performing Arts, GDFT Graphic Design: Film and Television, VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0201B Filmmaker Studies: Italian Cinema3 Credits

Attributes: ASVP American Studies: Visual and Performing Arts, CAOT Catholic Studies: Non-Religious Studies, E_AF English Literature After 1800, GDFT Graphic Design: Film and Television, ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused, ISIT Italian Studies: Italian, VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

This survey of Italian films as textual, cultural, and historical artifacts analyzes movements such as neorealism, commedia all'italiana, the spaghetti western, and new Italian cinema through the works of selected directors. The course follows a chronology from the silent period to present day, with special emphasis on the "golden ages" of Italian cinema, neo-realism of the postwar period, the 1960s' comedy of manners, and the new Italian cinema of the '80s and '90s. Students analyze the works of Rossellini, De Sica, Fellini, Visconti, Germi, Antonioni, Wertmüller, Leone, Pasolini, Moretti, Benigni, and others.

FTM 0204 African American Cinema3 Credits

Attributes: ASUP American Studies Upper Level, BSAH Black Studies: Arts and Humanities, BSFC Black Studies Focus Course, GDFT Graphic Design: Film and Television, UDIV U.S. Diversity, VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

Prerequisite: FTM 0010.

This course explores the historical, social and cultural significance of African American cinema from the silent era until present-day. Students will grapple with issues concerning the politics of representation of people of African descent in the American film industry and deepen their overall understanding of ways that African American filmmakers have achieved artistry and expression in spite of obstacles posed by race, class, and gender. Through regular screenings, readings, and presentations students will deepen their overall understanding of the impact of historical events and key filmic technological advancements on the establishment of the separate and unequal African American film industry.

FTM 0205 Survey of Film Music: Hearing the Movies3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

Prerequisite: FTM 0010 or MU 0103 or MU 0104.

This course provides an overview of film music from 1900 to today. Students investigate the defining characteristics of the major historical periods of film music; explore the social and historical events that shaped the industry; learn to actively listen to a score; and discuss salient features of a given score. The object in this course is to develop skills in analyzing the sound track, music's role in the sound track, and the relation of sound track and image track on small-scale and large-scale (narrative) levels. The course develops critical listening and viewing skills as well as a film-music historical survey.

FTM 0206 American Film: Decades (Shell)3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: FTM 0010.

This course examines the use of film form (e.g., cinematography, editing, sound design) in American movies made during a given 10-year period, as well as the social, cultural, historical and ideological contexts of the era in which they were made. Each iteration of the course is organized around particular themes relevant to the decade under discussion, e.g. "1970s - Rebels with Causes." See FTM 0206A, FTM 0206B, FTM 0206C, FTM 0206D, FTM 0206E.

FTM 0206A American Films: Decades: 1950s3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0206B American Films: Decades: 1960s3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

You Say You Want A Revolution: Radical 60s in American Film. The 1960s began as a reaction to the bland conservatism of the 1950s. Revolution was in the air: political, cultural, sexual. The 60s were shocked and rocked by assassinations, war, and domestic upheaval. The Beatles made art out of pop music, and millions of young people decided to "make love, not war." A bewildering array of new words and phrases entered the national vocabulary: pop art, folk-rock, heavy metal, hippies, "freaks," "pigs," happenings, sit-ins, counter culture, commune, psychedelic, Vietnam, Woodstock, Black Panthers, defoliation, body-bag, mini-skirt, the Pill, LSD, and M.A.D (Mutually Assured Destruction). The Age was Aquarius, the Medium was the Message, and the message was "Turn on, tune in, and drop out." Old Hollywood died in the 1960s, and the MPAA ratings were born. It remained to be seen how American films would respond to the times...

FTM 0206C American Films: Decades: 1970s3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0206D American Films: Decades: 1980s3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0206E American Films: Decades: 1990s3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0207 Film Genres (Shell)3 Credits

Prerequisite: FTM 0010.

Genres are categories of film characterized by recognizable conventions that include settings, stock characters, narrative patterns, stylistic devices, historical contexts, and themes. Genres interact with filmmakers' and audiences' shared expectations and evolve over time. Each iteration of this course examines a specific genre (e.g. the Western, Horror, Science Fiction, etc.) and evaluates it in terms of film form and its own evolving set of conventions. See FTM 0207A, FTM 0207B, FTM 0207C, FTM 0207D, FTM 0207E, FTM 0207F, FTM 0207G, FTM 0207H, FTM 0207I.

FTM 0207A Film Genres: Classic Comedy3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0207B Film Genres: Cult Cinema3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0207C Film Genres: Disaster/Apocalypse3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0207D Film Genres: Film Noir3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0207E Film Genres: Hollywood Musical3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0207F Film Genres: Horror3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0207G Film Genres: Independent Film3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0207H Film Genres: Science Fiction3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0207I Film Genres: The Western3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0208 Television Genres (Shell)3 Credits

Prerequisite: FTM 0010.

Basic to understanding television as an art form is the concept of genre. This course introduces students to the defining characteristics and the critical analysis of television genre. On a rotating basis, the course focuses on drama, serial, situation comedy, news and documentary, and reality television, examining distinct conception, writing, production, directing, editing and other conventions of each. Social and historical elements of the genre are also addressed. See FTM 0208A, FTM 0208B, FTM 0208C, FTM 0208D, FTM 0208E.

FTM 0208A TV Genres: Comedy3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0208B TV Genres: Contemporary Drama3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0208C TV Genres: Crime Dramas3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0208D TV Genres: Reality TV3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0208E TV Genres: Sitcoms3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

FTM 0209 Gender, Sexuality, and Cinema3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

Prerequisite: FTM 0010.

This course examines how American movies have portrayed gender and queer sexuality (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, and questioning) to create a range of stereotypical and multi-dimensional characters. From "coded" sexual references in classical films, to timid New Hollywood-era films, to today's thriving independent cinema, this representational genealogy includes condescending myth and bold truth-telling, works that both mirror and shape their cultural moment.

FTM 0210 Special Topics (Shell)3 Credits

Attributes: VPCH Visual and Performing Arts Core: History Course

These courses, offered periodically, focus in depth on a specific theme or issue, and may draw upon films from one or more countries, from among numerous directors, and from various periods in film history from the dawn of cinema to the present. Special applied courses may also be offered in this category. May be taken twice.

FTM 0220 Intermediate Screenwriting3 Credits

Attributes: VPC2 Visual and Performing Arts Core: Applied Course

Prerequisite: FTM 0120.

Writing a feature film script can be one of the most difficult and daunting tasks for a writer/filmmaker, yet it remains thedominant format in filmmaking practice. This class builds upon the foundation of FTM 0120, expanding upon the narrative techniques at play in short films and applying them to the roughly 90 page format. The majority of this class is structured like a writers room/group, where studentswrite, write, write and foster a collaborative environment where they share, critique and develop script ideas.

FTM 0230 Lighting and Cinematography3 Credits

Attributes: VPC2 Visual and Performing Arts Core: Applied Course

Prerequisites: FTM 0010, FTM 0011, FTM 0131.

This advanced motion picture production course focuses on the production of narrative fiction films. Students study and practice advanced techniques of film production- including preproduction, production and postproduction responsibilities of the producer relating to management, financing, contracts, distribution and other business elements of filmmaking. Students in the class collaborate to produce significantly more complex narrative films with more advanced camera, lighting, audio, and editing equipment.

FTM 0231 Documentary and Experimental Film Production3 Credits

Attributes: VPC2 Visual and Performing Arts Core: Applied Course

Fee: $55 Materials Fee

Prerequisite: FTM 0131.

This course is designed to develop skills and critical perspectives needed to produce documentary work that promote social activism and awareness. Through lectures, discussions, screenings, readings, and hands-on demonstrations, students will learn about pre-production, production, and post-production for documentary work. By the end of the semester students will write, produce, direct, and edit short documentaries focusing on social issues. By periodically presenting their own work, students will engage one another in discussions sharing constructive criticism concerning individual projects.

FTM 0232 Studio Television Production3 Credits

Attributes: ENPC Digital Journalism Production Component, VPC2 Visual and Performing Arts Core: Applied Course

Prerequisites: FTM 0010, FTM 0011, FTM 0131.

This course offers a theoretical and hands-on introduction to the art and technology of television production within a studio context. Students receive instruction on the creative and aesthetic use of the elements and technology of studio television production - cameras, audio, lighting, editing, set design, and program development - and participate in a series of projects completed individually and as part of a team.

FTM 0234 Directing for Film and Television3 Credits

Attributes: VPC2 Visual and Performing Arts Core: Applied Course

Prerequisites: FTM 0010, FTM 0011, FTM 0131.

This course explores what a film director does, how he/she manipulates and manages the divergent elements of cinema into a coherent whole, and often, into a unique and personal vision. The specific tasks of a director related to her/his role with crew and with actors, and in the development of a film from start to finish, are studied from practical and theoretical perspectives.

FTM 0235 Digital Motion Graphics3 Credits

Attributes: VPC2 Visual and Performing Arts Core: Applied Course

Fee: $55 Materials Fee

Prerequisite: FTM 0010.

The digital revolution has arrived for production of television and video. This course introduces the theory and basics of digital graphic design and editing, incorporating three-dimensional graphics, music, and sound effects. Students master nonlinear programs and technology such as Final Cut Pro, Avid, Photoshop, Flash, and Dreamweaver.

FTM 0236 Digital Audio Workstation3 Credits

Attributes: VPC2 Visual and Performing Arts Core: Applied Course

Prerequisite: FTM 0011, FTM 0130; or MU 0150 or MU 0156.

This course will provide the student with an in-depth knowledge of the practical application of the Digital Audio Workstation (DAW). This course is primarily designed for students interested in audio editing as it applies to producing recordings, creating sound effects, and soundtrack design for film/TV/radio. Creating samples, recording techniques, waveform manipulation, mixing, and the role of the Digital Audio Workstation in the overall process of sound design will be explored. Students will be proficient at using Logic Pro audio soft­ware to manipulate MIDI and audio. Students will learn how to record live sound effects from the environment and manipulate the recordings to create Foley sound effects, and apply them to a film segment. Students will learn to mix and master a segment of multi-track audio.

FTM 0237 Acting for the Camera3 Credits

Attributes: VPC2 Visual and Performing Arts Core: Applied Course

Prerequisite: TA 0030.

This course is an experiential introduction to the spe­cialized techniques used in successful on-camera acting. On-camera exercises will emphasize the importance of listening, truthful moment-to-moment response, and effective communication skills. Students will practice their skills and apply their training to com­mercials, current television scripts, and screenplays. Initial classes examine the difference between acting for the stage and acting for the camera. Students will practice a variety of on-camera styles including com­edy, crime drama, and commercials. The course builds towards longer scene work from a screenplay. Topics include script analysis, nuance and depth of perfor­mance, and relaxation and confidence on-camera.

FTM 0305 Independent Study1-3 Credits

Usually open only to students majoring or minoring in Film, Television, and Media Arts with a concentration in film, this course allows a student to pursue in depth a topic or project in film or television or media arts history/theory or production, in close consultation with a faculty member of the Film, Television, and Media Arts program. Enrollment by permission of instructor only. May be taken twice.

FTM 0306 Internship in Film, Television, and Media Arts1-3 Credits

In consultation with a faculty member, upper-level major and minor students arrange a semester-long internship with one of many film production companies located within Connecticut and the New York metropolitan area. The course combines on-site supervision and meetings with faculty advisors with weekly journal submissions and an assigned paper at the end of the internship. Enrollment by permission of instructor only. May be taken twice.

FTM 0310 Capstone Seminar I3 Credits

Prerequisite: Completion of all other major requirements.

This course provides an opportunity for Film, Television, and Media Arts majors in their senior year to produce a creative work that pulls together the theoretical concepts and technical skills they have acquired during their years in the Program. This course is required for all Film, Television, and Media Arts majors, who must take it in the fall semester of their senior year. The capstone project is completed in FTM 0311 in the spring semester of a major's senior year.

FTM 0311 Capstone Seminar II3 Credits

Prerequisites: FTM 0310.

This course provides an opportunity for Film, Television, and Media Arts majors in their senior year to produce a creative work that pulls together the theoretical concepts and technical skills they have acquired during their years in the Program. This course is required for all Film, Television, and Media Arts majors, who must take it in the spring semester of their senior year.