Applied Ethics (AE)

AE 0262 Ethics and the Community3 Credits

Attributes: PJST Peace and Justice Studies

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course surveys the philosophical grounding of the organizations in contemporary society, examining structured human groups from the household, through the village (or religious/ethnic association), to the nation-state to understand their moral undertakings in their environment; to consider how they implement and balance rights and duties, rules and compassion, autonomy and common purposes. This course gives special attention to structural injustice in the treatment of those marginalized by gender, race, or socioeconomic deficit, and includes an effort to determine where new understanding may yield suggestions for structural modification. Students are provided the opportunity to research and present projects on contemporary social problems that illustrate the themes of the course.

AE 0265 Ethics in Education3 Credits

Attributes: EDCG Educational Studies Cognate, EDDV Educational Studies Diversity

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This survey of the ethical issues that arise in the classroom, school, and school district also covers those issues, to a lesser extent, in the educational policies of the state and federal government. The course directly addresses issues of race, class, and gender in the educational system, addressing entitlement to education, access to education, discipline in the educational setting, multicultural issues in general, politics, accountability, assessment, and the ethics of respect as they pertain to teachers, students, and administrators.

AE 0270 Ethical Dimensions of Global Violence3 Credits

Attributes: WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

A survey of the ethical implications of the new and alarming potentials for violence in a disorderly world. The new faces of violence - insurgency, terrorism inspired by religion, plans for mass destruction, children as warriors - will be examined in the context of Just War theory, the Christian commitment to social justice, and the emerging international order (and disorder). Fully half the course will explore the perspectives of the developing world, especially as violence occurs between factions from the developing world and the traditional wielders of force in the North and West.

AE 0271 The Sacred Balance3 Credits

Attributes: WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course examines contemporary perspectives and diverse cultural worldviews demonstrating a reciprocal relationship between humanity and the natural world. This approach analyzes the ways established and new fields in the sciences can reunite knowledge of the world with a sense of the sacred. Extending into the realm of meaning and value, scientific as well as spiritual perspectives jointly address the ecological challenges confronting contemporary society and the evolution of human consciousness.

AE 0272 Ethics of Humanitarian Action3 Credits

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course provides students with principles and methods of ethics that they will apply to issues of humanitarian action. Examples of humanitarian action to be considered in this course include the international humanitarian system run by states, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), the United Nations and its lead agencies and, increasingly, the private sector. Students also will learn about the development of humanitarian codes of conduct, values and principles, which they will evaluate in terms of their ethical content.

AE 0275 Ethics and the Global Environment3 Credits

Attributes: WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

A survey of environmental issues on the global scale, exploring ethical and economic dilemmas of liberty and law, justice and welfare, conflicts of cultures, race, and gender, as they arise in the increasing interaction of developed and developing nations. The course focuses on the role of science - with special reference to scientific uncertainty - in the articulation of issues like global warming, the depletion of the ozone layer, and species extinction. The ethical dilemmas and environmental implications of the work of multinational corporations are examined through case studies and group discussion; term projects focus on selected areas and industries.

AE 0276 Ethical Dimensions of Global Business Practices3 Credits

Attributes: HACA Humanitarian Action Minor Context Course, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

A survey of the ethical dimensions of contemporary business practice generally, with special emphasis on the ethical implications of global business enterprise. Topics include global employment practices, human and employee rights in a global economy, the implications of external debt for the economies of developing nations, the human costs and benefits of the changes in global agriculture and food provision generally, and the work of international agencies (the World Trade Organization, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank in particular) in guiding the economies of the world. A three-week unit will focus on the economic implications of natural and man made disasters and humanitarian crises.

AE 0281 Ethics of Communications3 Credits

Attributes: ENEC Digital Journalism Ethics Component

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course examines the moral dilemmas of media management, political propaganda, campaign promo-tions, public relations, and corporate communication. Topics include advertising and marketing practices, especially political advocacy and messages targeted to various audiences; truth and loyalty in public relations practices; the philosophical and constitutional bases of freedom of the press; and problems of media bias, systematic and otherwise.

AE 0282 Ethics and the Computer3 Credits

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course examines the legal and ethical dilemmas spawned by the proliferation of Internet-based technologies in an increasingly complex society. Topics include the philosophical foundations of the right of privacy; the centralization of power; the impact on employment, computer crime, patents, property, and liability; the tremendous power of instantaneous Internet communications to influence world events; and the possibilities and implications of artificial intelligence. Central consideration is given to the digital divide: the potential for global injustice in global discordances between rich and poor societies in access to the Internet and other advanced technology.

AE 0283 Environmental Justice3 Credits

Attributes: EVPE Environmental Studies Elective, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course offers a comprehensive study of the political impact of our global environmental crisis examined through the lens of the relationship of self to society. We study current scientific, religious, economic, and political perspectives that impact our ecological reality globally, including health, trade, population, and waste issues. Working in self-selected groups, students have the opportunity to report on alternative models and activists' movements aimed at creating a global sustainable future.

AE 0284 Environmental Ethics3 Credits

Attributes: EVHU Environmental Studies: Humanities, EVPE Environmental Studies Elective, PJST Peace and Justice Studies

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

Students examine the environmental problems that arise in our attempts to reconcile the demands of human fulfillment and economic activity, and the requirements of ecological balance. Issues include the diverse perspectives of conservation, preservation, and deep ecology. Student projects cover the wise use of resources; pollution of land, air, and water; conservation of species and open space; global climatic change; and the future stewardship of oceans, forests, and the atmosphere.

AE 0285 Ethics of Health Care3 Credits

Attributes: HSTE Health Studies: Traditions, Delivery, and Ethics

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course considers the moral dilemmas of the healthcare setting. Topics include patients' rights (medical paternalism and patient autonomy, informed consent to therapy, and participation in research); dilemmas of reproduction (technological assistance, abortion, cloning); dilemmas of life and death (assisted suicide, euthanasia, technological interventions for the dying); allocation of healthcare resources; and the special dilemmas of healthcare professionals caught in binds between HMO contracts and professional obligations.

AE 0286 Ethics of Research and Technology3 Credits

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course explores the moral dilemmas that attend the search for an application of scientific knowledge. Topics include the methods of science and their limits (e.g., in research with human subjects); scientific fraud, its dimensions and prevention; and the effects of rapidly expanding fields of technology on medicine and industry.

AE 0287 Engineering Ethics3 Credits

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course systematically explores the ethical dimensions of situations and tasks common to engineering practice. Issues include professionalism, codes of ethics, consumer risk and safety, employee loyalty and whistle-blowing, research and ownership of information, and the engineer's responsibility to the natural environment.

AE 0288 Ethical Dimensions of Global Humanitarian Policy3 Credits

Attributes: WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course surveys the ethical dilemmas that arise in the context of global need and global opportunity, specifically the needs of physical, psychological, and spiritual sustenance and support created in the developing world by many kinds of violence, exploitation, and environmental crises, and the opportunities perceived in the developed world to provide assistance through international, governmental, and non-governmental avenues. Topics include the ethical analyses of emerging crises and assessments of needs; the typical structures of assistance, public and private, and the consequences (intended or otherwise) of deploying them; and the dilemmas of seeking and assessing help from donors of uncertain motives and histories.

AE 0289 Global Health Care Ethics3 Credits

Attributes: HSTE Health Studies: Traditions, Delivery, and Ethics, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This survey of issues of public health on a global scale explores the ethical and economic dilemmas of environmental degradation, national sovereignty, individual liberty, and human happiness and productivity as they arise in the increasing interaction of developed and developing nations. The course studies conditions prevalent in developing nations - poverty, hunger, the absence of physical and social infrastructure, and uneven education, as well as the role of gender and race discrimination - and examines ethical dilemmas confronted in the efforts to deal with health conditions in the developing nations, through case studies and group discussion; term projects focus on selected regions and health conditions.

AE 0290 Ethics in America: Telecourse3 Credits

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course is a survey of practical ethics, in which televised discussions of selected topics in applied ethics (ethics in government, ethics in the military, medical ethics, business ethics, etc.) illustrate the basic concepts of the Western tradition in ethical reasoning (autonomy, justice, privacy, community, etc.). The discussions feature influential public figures in each field; readings include important writings in the history of ethics. Format: lecture/discussion with in-class video presentations.

AE 0291 Business Ethics3 Credits

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course investigates ethical problems in business practice. Topics include the foundation of the free-market system, personal morality in profit-oriented enterprises; codes of ethics, obligations to employees and other stakeholders; truth in advertising, whistle-blowing, and company loyalty; self and government regulation; the logic and future of capitalism; and the changing responsibilities of the manager in a rapidly globalizing business environment.

AE 0293 Ethics of War and Peace3 Credits

Attributes: PJST Peace and Justice Studies

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This is a survey of issues relating to war and international conflict. Topics include Just War theory, human rights issues, the impact of war on women, the role of the United Nations Security Council, and the history of global attempts to proscribe and prevent aggression. The course also looks at related issues that have emerged in recent years, such as humanitarian intervention and economic sanctions.

AE 0294 Ethics of Media and Politics3 Credits

Attributes: ENEC Digital Journalism Ethics Component

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course explores the ethical dimensions of the complex relationship between the media and the political process. The media is the only industry protected by the Bill of Rights, and for good reason: it is critical for a democracy to have well-informed citizens. The course looks at the responsibility of the media, and the difficulties of fulfillment in a capitalist society. Who needs to be informed? What is the role of the government in providing information? Students learn ethics from informed discussions, study, and writing on the cases presented.

AE 0295 Ethics in Law and Society3 Credits

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course is an inquiry into the ethical dilemmas of making, enforcing, adjudicating, obeying and practicing the law. Topics include the nature of law and the province of jurisprudence, responsibility of the criminal bar (defense, prosecution, judicial), conflicts of interest, election or appointment of judges, the moral infrastructure of the Constitution, the limits of adjudication, and issues relating to investigative technique (torture and extreme confinement conditions).

AE 0296 Ethics in Government3 Credits

Attributes: ENEC Digital Journalism Ethics Component

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course examines the moral dilemmas pertaining to governing and being governed. Topics include the ethical dimensions of making public policy; civil rights and civil liberties; the "establishment of justice" with regard to minorities, women, immigrants, and those politically at risk; corruption in government; war, peace, revolution, and the moral principles that govern them; terrorism and the defense against terrorism; preservation of the environment; and the nature and limits of representative government.

AE 0297 Ecofeminism3 Credits

Attributes: EVPE Environmental Studies Elective, PJST Peace and Justice Studies, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course explores the historically strong association between women and nature, in which the image of Mother Earth is central, and critiques the power-as-domination assumption of our culture shown in the exploitation of women and of the earth. Students examine religious, psychological, social, historical, and scientific manifestations of this assumption, along with alternative models of power and responsibility.

AE 0298 Ethics and Feminist Perspectives3 Credits

Attributes: PJST Peace and Justice Studies, WSGF Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Gender Focused

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This course offers a philosophical inquiry into the implications of traditional ethical theory and social institutions from perspectives developed in contemporary feminist literature. Examined through the lens of race, class, and gender, specific areas include family, health, work, and media issues. The course explores the psychological and ethical dimensions of social and family oppression, environmental racism, medical paternalism, economic imperialism, and patriarchal structures in the major religious traditions.

AE 0299 Special Topics in Applied Ethics (Shell)3 Credits

The course is an opportunity for the student to carry out a major project in Applied Ethics involving work in the community, derived from a previous Applied Ethics course.

AE 0384 Reflections of the Environment: Focus on Latin America and the Caribbean3 Credits

Attributes: EVPE Environmental Studies Elective, LCEL LACS Minor: Elective, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisites: Two courses in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This seminar examines environmental, ethical, and socio-economic issues of Latin America and the Caribbean. It integrates the hard sciences (biology, chemistry, physics, and physical geography), the social sciences (sociology, politics, economics, and business), and the humanities (history, ethics, theology, and literature). The capstone experience provides students with an overview of multiple perspectives on the environment of Latin America and the Caribbean with a focus on some specific countries and issues. Students conduct independent research projects that demonstrate their mastery of at least one component of each disciplinary group. This seminar counts for the capstone requirement for the minor in Applied Ethics and the minor in Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

AE 0391 Seminar in Business Law, Regulation, and Ethics3 Credits

Prerequisites: Two courses in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This seminar investigates ethical dilemmas of business management, primarily as encountered in real cases. Themes vary from year to year. Format: guest presentations by members of the business community, followed by discussion.

AE 0393 Seminar in War, Peace, and Public Policy3 Credits

Prerequisite: Two courses in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This seminar examines the philosophical, political, and religious aspects of war and peace. Topics include the origin and development of just war theory, the pacifist tradition, revolution, guerrilla warfare, and military preparedness. The course focuses on the increased complexity of these issues in the 20th century and especially in the nuclear age.

AE 0395 Seminar in Legal Ethics3 Credits

Prerequisites: Two courses in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This seminar examines the peculiar ethical dilemmas confronting lawyers: confidentiality, protection of the guilty, roles in public policy, conflict of interest, and, in general, responsibility for the functioning of the adversary system.

AE 0397 Seminar in Bioethics I: Ethical Issues in Health Care Practice3 Credits

Attributes: HSTE Health Studies: Traditions, Delivery, and Ethics, UDIV U.S. Diversity

Prerequisites: Two courses in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This seminar presents an intensive study of select problems in the ethics of medicine and healthcare practice, including abortion; euthanasia; prenatal diagnosis; reproductive engineering and surrogate motherhood; and treatment decisions for very ill newborns.

AE 0398 Seminar in Bioethics II: Ethical Issues in Biomedical Research and Resource Allocation3 Credits

Attributes: HSTE Health Studies: Traditions, Delivery, and Ethics

Prerequisites: Two courses in Philosophy or Religious Studies.

This seminar offers an intensive study of select problems in the ethics, law, and public policy surrounding healthcare, especially in the United States. Topics include research with human subjects, the professional/patient relationship, allocation of scarce resources, and cost containment.

AE 0399 Special Topics in Applied Ethics3 Credits

Students undertake an advanced program of course, field, and library work arranged with the instructor. Proposals for special topics must be approved by the director and the dean of the student's school.