Classical Studies (CL)

CL 0106 Masterpieces of Greek Literature in English Translation3 Credits

Attributes: E_BF English Literature Before 1800

This course surveys major works of ancient Greek literature, emphasizing the content of this literature as a key to understanding classical Greek civilization and as meaningful in a contemporary context. This course may be taken to fulfill the core requirement in English literature.

CL 0107 Masterpieces of Roman Literature in English Translation3 Credits

Attributes: E_BF English Literature Before 1800

This course surveys major works of Roman literature of the republic and early empire, emphasizing the content of this literature as a key to understanding Roman civilization, and as meaningful in a contemporary context. This course may be taken to fulfill the core requirement in English literature.

CL 0108 Myth in Classical Literature3 Credits

This course introduces students to classical mythology through an examination of the diverse ways in which myth and legend are treated in the literatures of ancient Greece and Rome. Students read texts in English translation; knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required. This course may be taken to fulfill the core requirement in English literature.

CL 0109 Greek Tragedy in English Translation3 Credits

An intensive study in translation of the surviving works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. Knowledge of Greek is not required. This course may be taken to fulfill the core requirement in English literature.

CL 0115 Greek Civilization3 Credits

Students study the Greek experience: the social and cultural values, political institutions, and economic structures of the ancient Greeks and their effect on the historical process in the period down to the death of Alexander. Knowledge of Greek is not required. This course may be taken to fulfill the core requirement in History.

CL 0116 Roman Civilization3 Credits

Attributes: ISIC Italian Studies: Italy Component

Roman civilization spanned more than 1,000 years of history and culture, and influenced western society in profound ways. This course traces Rome's development from a small local tribe to a world power, examining how it expanded and conquered the Mediterranean and absorbed into its culture aspects of the peoples it defeated. Knowledge of Latin is not required. This course may be taken to fulfill the core requirement in History.

CL 0127 Romantic Love in Greek and Roman Literature3 Credits

Attributes: E_BF English Literature Before 1800

Prerequisites: EN 0011, EN 0012.

The course of true love never did run smooth. From Homer's Penelopoe to Ovid's Remedies of Love we will examine the permutations of romantic desire and its frustrations in the literature of Greece and Rome. Readings also include selections from Sappho's poetry, Sophocles' Women of Trachis, Euripides' Hippolytos and Medea, comedies by Menander and Terence, Catullus poems to Lesbia, Vergil's tale of Dido and Aeneas, selections from the elegies of Tibullus Sulpicia, Propertius and Ovide, and briefer excerpts from other authors. All readings are in English translation. This course may be taken to fulfill the core requirement in English literature.

CL 0199 Special Topics (Shell)3 Credits

This course explores a specific topic in the interdisciplinary field of classical studies. Content will vary in successive offerings of this course.

CL 0221 Hellenistic World, 336-30 BC3 Credits

Attributes: H_BF History Before 1750, H_EU European History, H_NW Non-Western History, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: CL 0115 or CL 0116 or HI 0010.

The course examines the Mediterranean world and the ancient near east from the late fourth to late first centuries BC. Focus is on: the career of Alexander the Great; the Greek kingdoms that emerge after the collapse of his empire; the interaction between local cultures and religions - e.g. Egypt, ancient Judaism - and Greek civilization; the social history of daily life in conquered lands under Greek rule; and the transformations in the Hellenistic world with the arrival of Roman rule.

CL 0222 The Roman Revolution3 Credits

Attributes: H_BF History Before 1750, H_EU European History, ISIF Italian Studies: Italy-Focused

Prerequisite: CL 0115 or CL 0116 or HI 0010.

This course presents a comprehensive study of the political, social, artistic, literary, and military transformation of Rome from the middle of the second-century B.C. through the reign of Augustus, with special attention given to Rome's response to the cultural and governmental challenges imposed by its growing empire and how its responses forever changed the course of Western civilization.

CL 0223 The Roman World in Late Antiquity, 284-642 AD3 Credits

Attributes: H_BF History Before 1750, H_EU European History

Prerequisite: CL 0115 or CL 0116 or HI 0010.

The course examines the Mediterranean world from the third to seventh centuries AD. Focus is on: the collapse of the Roman Empire in western Europe; the dramatic upheavals caused by the arrival in the Roman Empire of the Visigoths, Vandals, and other barbarian tribes; the survival of the Byzantine East through the early Islamic conquests; the rise of Christianity from a persecuted religion to the official religion of the Roman Empire; and the accompanying cultural transformations, including the rise of monasticism and the importance of the holy man.

CL 0224 Byzantine World3 Credits

Attributes: H_EU European History

Prerequisite: HI 0010 or CL 0115 or CL 0116.

This course is an introduction to political and social history of Byzantine Empire. It also highlights Byzantium's role as a bridge between Greco-Roman antiquity and modern European civilization. Course lectures will cover Byzantium's origins in the eastern half of the Roman Empire, Byzantium's middle period as a major Mediterranean power, and its late period as an increasingly shrinking city-state. The course will also introduce students to some of the major Byzantine historians and to methods of analysis using these sources, and train students to form historical arguments based on these analyses.

CL 0325 Athenian Democracy and Empire3 Credits

Attributes: H_BF History Before 1750, H_EU European History

Prerequisite: CL 0115 or CL 0116 or HI 0010; CL 0115 or CL 0116 or one 200-level History course.

This history seminar provides an in-depth exploration of classical Athens at the height of its power in the fifth century BC. Its focus is on close reading of the primary sources describing the rise and fall of Athens in this period. It places particular emphasis on the parallel rise of Athenian democracy at home and the Athenian empire overseas. It places secondary emphasis on the nature of Athenian intellectual discourse in this period. A final research project will engage modern scholarly debates on the nature of fifth-century Athens.

CL 0399 Capstone Project in Classics3 Credits

Prerequisite: At least seven courses in the individually designed major.

Students completing an individually designed major in classical studies develop and carry out a major project that allows them to pull together the multiple threads of their interdisciplinary major.