Education (EDUC)

EDUC 2201 Explorations in Education 3 Credits

Attributes: UDIV U.S. Diversity

In this course, students/candidates discover how education is accomplished in schools through the social construction of teaching and learning. Through participant observation, service learning, reflections, assigned readings, class discussions and collaboration, candidates contribute positively to student learning in local schools and communities with diverse (socioeconomic, linguistic, race/ethnicity) populations, understand the complexities of schooling from multiple insider perspectives, and engage in the process of discerning whether to pursue a career in education. Successful completion of this course is one of the prerequisites for admission to the teacher education program. Approximately 25 hours of service in a local school is required. Previously ED 0200.

EDUC 2329 Philosophy of Education: An Introduction 3 Credits

This course applies the basic concepts of philosophy to education in general and to contemporary education theory in particular to acquaint educators with philosophical terminology, to improve the clarity of their thinking, and to encourage personal commitment to their own life philosophies. It also provides the opportunity to ask fundamental questions about the aims and purposes of education and schooling in a multicultural democratic society; the ethical dimensions of the teaching/learning relationship; the effects of poverty and injustice on the lives of young people, their families and communities; and the role of the imagination in transforming the world. A range of philosophical perspectives will be explored including Jesuit Education/Ignatian Pedagogy, Deweyan Progressive education, and Freirian Critical Pedagogy. Previously ED 0329.

EDUC 3241 Educational Psychology 3 Credits

This course considers a particular application of the more important psychological principles to educational theory and practice, embracing a systematic study of the educable being, habit formation, phases of learning, intellectual and emotional growth, and character formation. The course, which includes a 15-hour field experience in an approved, ethnically diverse public school setting, also examines individual differences, transfer of training, interest, attention, and motivation insofar as they influence the teaching process. Graduate equivalent: EDUC 5442. Previously ED 0241.

EDUC 3350 Special Learners in the Mainstream 3 Credits

This course familiarizes the mainstream professional with the special learning needs of children and youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities, learning disabilities, emotional disturbances, severe disabilities, multiple disabilities, and those who are gifted and talented. Topics include methods of identifying and working effectively with children and youth with special learning needs in the regular classroom; the roles and responsibilities of counselors, psychologists, educators, and ancillary personnel as members of a multidisciplinary team in planning educational services for exceptional learners; and laws that impact on assessment, placement, parent and student rights, and support services. This course may require a fieldwork component as part of the evaluation process. Note: This course is not for those pursuing an initial certificate or cross-endorsement in special education; it is for general educators and students in affiliated fields of study. Previously ED 0350.

EDUC 5405 Contexts of Education in the Primary Grades 3 Credits

Based on current theory and practice in multicultural education, learning theory, child development, and classroom management, this course provides the opportunity to learn about and design learning environments in which primary grade children thrive, build supportive learning communities, and develop social conscience. Previously ED 0405.

EDUC 5410 Literature for Young Adults 3 Credits

Attributes: EDCG Educational Studies Cognate, E_AF English Literature After 1800

During the past two decades, adolescent literature has proliferated, grown more diverse, and improved in richness and quality. The course explores the major current authors, poets, and illustrators of works written for young adults. Topics include theories and purposes of reading literature in the classroom; criteria development for evaluating adolescent literature; reader response in the classroom; reading workshop; and adolescent literature integration across the curriculum. Previously EN 0405.

EDUC 5411 Teaching Writing in the 3-12 Classroom 3 Credits

This course provides teachers and prospective teachers with a theoretical background in writing process as well as practical techniques for applying the theory. The course helps teachers develop awareness of their own composing processes and the processes of others. Topics include writing needs of diverse populations, the reading/writing relationship, writing of different genres, mini-lessons, conferencing techniques, revision techniques, writing across the curriculum, publishing alternatives, portfolios, and other forms of assessment. Underlying the class is the premise that in sharing their perspectives, teachers at the elementary and secondary levels enhance each other's performance as writing educators and as writers. Previously EN 0411.

EDUC 5417 Teaching and Learning Grammar 3 Credits

Designed for English education majors and for experienced English teachers, this course presents an introduction to the principles of modern descriptive linguistics, especially as it relates to present-day English, its grammatical structure, its sound and spelling systems, and its vocabulary and rules of usage. The course approaches modern English grammar from structural and transformational viewpoints, placing special emphasis on the teaching of language arts, including composition and stylistic analysis. Previously EN 0417.

EDUC 5429 Philosophical Foundations of Education 3 Credits

Drawing on a range of philosophical perspectives, this foundational course provides candidates with the opportunity to analyze critically some of the recurring themes in educational thought and connect them to the contemporary educational context. Fundamental questions examined include: the meaning of one's chosen vocation; the purposes of education and schooling in a democratic society; the ethical dimensions of the teaching/learning relationship; and the role of the social imagination in transforming the world. Previously ED 0429.

EDUC 5431 Extending Literacy in the Elementary School: Grades 3-6 3 Credits

Prerequisite: EDUC 5437.

This course explores the continuation of literacy development and learning, with emphasis on content-area literacy development in the later elementary grades. Guided by current research and practice in literacy, pedagogy, human development, and multicultural education, candidates learn to assess and develop children's literacy strategies and skills, organize and facilitate group and individual learning in reading and writing, and design and carry out content-based curriculum to support continued literacy development and social responsibility. The course addressed the integration of visual and performing arts and appropriate use of electronic technology, includes collaborative work with cooperating teachers, and requires at least two hours per week of fieldwork in priority school districts. Previously ED 0431.

EDUC 5437 Developing Literacy in the Elementary School: Primary Grades 3 Credits

This course explores developmental literacy, with an emphasis on primary grades. Guided by current research and practice in literacy, pedagogy, human development, and multicultural education, candidates assess and develop children's literacy strategies and skills; organize and implement group and individual instruction in reading and writing; develop a technologically current, literate classroom environment; and design curriculum to support literacy development and social responsibility. Course requirements include: collaborative work with peers and cooperating teachers, an extensive case study, and at least two hours per week of fieldwork in a priority school district. Previously ED 0437.

EDUC 5441 Teaching and Learning within Multicultural Contexts of Education 3 Credits

This course explores and addresses the multifaceted aspects of multicultural education with the aim of engaging in a teaching-learning process where participants explore their commitment to the well-being and learning of all students; develop a deep understanding of the needs of all students; develop strategies to promote caring, justice, and equity in teaching; learn to respect linguistic, racial, ethnic, gender, and cultural diversity; investigate how students construct knowledge; demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between students' daily life experiences and education; and critique systematic processes of discrimination that marginalize and silence various groups of students. Crosslisted with TSLA 5441. Previously ED 0441.

EDUC 5442 Educational Psychology 3 Credits

Designed to provide an understanding of the psychology of teaching and learning, this course emphasizes child and adolescent development, motivation techniques, teaching and learning theories, strategies for working with culturally diverse student populations, student performance monitoring and assessment, and current issues in educational psychology. Especially appropriate for those new to the profession, this course helps participants develop insights into student behavior. Course requirements include field experience in a culturally diverse school setting approved by the instructor for a minimum of 20 hours. Marriage and Family Therapy candidates require Dean's approval. Undergraduate equivalent: EDUC 3241. Previously ED 0442.

EDUC 5447 Learning Mathematics in the Elementary Classroom 3 Credits

In accordance with the professional standards for teaching mathematics, this course emphasizes the important decisions a teacher makes in teaching: setting goals, selecting or creating a variety of appropriate mathematical tasks, supporting classroom discourse; integrating mathematics across the curriculum; assessing student learning; and creating a supportive classroom environment. During this course, candidates explore the relevance of theory in the classroom. In addition, candidates investigate the development of specific concepts such as computation and geometry in elementary age children. Candidates engage in adult-level mathematics activities designed to increase an understanding of mathematics, examine the latest research on how children learn mathematics, and explore strategies for dealing with diverse learners. Additionally, as socially responsible educators, candidates examine how mathematical practices and teaching methods are influenced by underlying theoretical principles linked to history and the position of the classroom teacher. Course requirements include on-site fieldwork in an elementary school for a minimum of two hours per week during the semester. Previously ED 0447.

EDUC 5455 The Literate Learner: Developmental Reading in Middle and Secondary Schools, Grades 5-12 3 Credits

In this course, designed for new and experienced middle and high school educators, candidates explore and use cutting edge theory and best practices in literacy research to support powerful student learning across curricular area, with an emphasis on reading comprehension at the secondary level. Candidates learn a repertoire of research-based strategies and tools to help diverse learners make meaning from a variety of texts in their subject area, including non-print and media texts. Areas explored include questioning techniques, concept development, study strategies, and assessment. Candidates will infuse critical and strategic instructional strategies for teaching reading and communication into content area curriculum. Candidates not currently teaching will be expected to work with a teacher in a high needs school for 25 hours in order to complete the requirements for the course. Previously ED 0455.

EDUC 5462 Science Methods 3 Credits

This course includes a comprehensive study of the principles, methods, and materials necessary for teaching science at the secondary level. Candidates explore effective elements of instruction as they relate to practical applications in the classroom. The course addresses teaching science through course readings, lesson and unit plan design, and videotaped mini-teaching sessions. This course includes a required field service component consisting of 20 hours of teaching with a practicing science teacher. Enrollment by permission only. Requires submission of a resume, a one-page philosophy of education writing sample, a data form, and permission of the coordinator of Science Education. Previously ED 0462.

EDUC 5463 World Language Methods 3 Credits

This course includes a comprehensive study of the principles, methods, and materials necessary for teaching world language at the secondary level. Candidates explore effective elements of instruction as they relate to practical applications in the classroom. The course addresses teaching world language through course readings, lesson and unit plan design, and mini-teaching sessions. This course includes a required field service component consisting of 10 hours of teaching with a practicing language teacher. Enrollment by permission only. Requires submission of a resume, a one-page philosophy of education writing sample, a data form, and permission of the coordinator of World Language Education. Previously ED 0463.

EDUC 5464 Mathematics Methods 3 Credits

This course includes a comprehensive study of the principles, methods, and materials necessary for teaching mathematics at the secondary level. Candidates explore effective elements of instruction as they relate to practical applications in the classroom. The course addresses teaching mathematics through course readings, lesson and unit plan design, and videotaped mini-teaching sessions. This course includes a required field service component consisting of 10 hours of teaching with a practicing mathematics teacher. Enrollment by permission only. Requires submission of a resume, a one-page philosophy of education writing sample, a data form, and permission of the coordinator of Mathematics Education. Previously ED 0464.

EDUC 5466 English Methods 3 Credits

Candidates explore the organizational pattern in which English can best be taught and analyze the effectiveness of various methodology in bringing about changes in the language usage of young people. The course considers such factors as appropriate curriculum materials, methods of organization, approaches to literature study, and procedures most cogent in the fields of grammar, composition, oral communication, and dialogue. The course addresses teaching English through course readings, lesson and unit plan design, and videotaped mini-teaching sessions. This course requires a field service component consisting of 10 hours of teaching with a practicing English teacher. Enrollment by permission only. Requires submission of a resume, a one-page philosophy of education writing sample, a data form, and permission of the coordinator of English Education. Previously ED 0466.

EDUC 5468 Social Studies/History Methods 3 Credits

This course combines theory, research and practice through a comprehensive application of the principles, methods, and materials necessary for teaching social studies/history at the secondary level. Candidates explore effective elements of instruction as they relate to practical applications in the classroom. The course addresses teaching social studies/history through course readings and resources, lesson and unit plan design, and videotaped mini-teaching sessions. This course includes a required field service component consisting of 10 hours of teaching with a practicing social studies/history teacher. Enrollment by permission only. Requires submission of a resume, a one-page philosophy of education writing sample, a data form, and permission of the coordinator of Social Studies/History Education. Previously ED 0468.

EDUC 5493 Educational Imagination: Exploring Multicultural Identities & Curriculum in a Cross-Cultural Context 3 Credits

This course explores alternative approaches to education. Drawing on the works of liberatory educators, such as Paulo Freire and Maxine Greene, as well as the arts and popular culture, this course provides the basis for dialogue on the transformative power of our imagination. This course views the teacher's role as one of empowering students to think critically about themselves and their relation to education and a multicultural society, and the student's role as one of active participation in the learning process. Connecting theory, practice and personal experience in useful and imaginative ways, we will, in the words of Maxine Greene, begin to see: schooling as it could be otherwise; teaching as it could be otherwise; learning as it could be otherwise; culture as it could be otherwise; the world as it could be otherwise. Previously ED 0493.

EDUC 5497 Teaching Science in the Elementary Classroom 3 Credits

This course includes a comprehensive study of the principles, methods, and materials necessary for teaching science at the elementary level. Candidates explore effective elements of instruction as they relate to practical applications in the classroom. The course addresses teaching science through readings, active participation in class activities, lesson/unit plan design and micro-teaching, class discussions, and individual reflections. Guided by current research and practice in science education, candidates in this course design science curricula for the elementary grades that develop content knowledge, science inquiry skills, critical thinking, problem solving, social responsibility, and technological competence. This course includes a required 10-hour field component. Previously ED 0497.

EDUC 5900 Special Topics (Shell) 1-3 Credits

This course provides faculty and candidates the opportunity to explore advanced and/or timely topics in education. Guided by the foundational premises of the GSEAP conceptual framework, candidates develop knowledge and culturally sensitive professional capacity with regard to the specified topic through readings, class discussion, and authentic activity, including advocacy. Topics may vary each semester and are determined by the Educational Studies and Teacher Preparation Department as a reflection of pertinent and timely themes that are not otherwise covered in depth in existing courses. Upon faculty advisement, candidates may take two special topics courses during their matriculation. Previously ED 0403.

EDUC 5981 K-12 Teaching Internship Seminar for Initial Certification Candidates 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Matriculated status in an initial educator certification MA or SYC program in the Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions.

This seminar is designed for pre-service teachers working as teaching interns while pursuing a graduate degree. Candidates engage in the reflective practice and action of Ignatian pedagogy, connect theory and practice, and develop an identity as educators for social justice and social responsibility. Seminar activities increase in sophistication as the teaching internships progress. Candidates must enroll in the seminar every semester of their teaching internships. May not be used to fulfill degree requirements. Previously ED 0401.

EDUC 6501 Practicum for Literacy Teacher Consultants 2 or 3 Credits

Prerequisite: ED 0561.

The Practicum for Literacy Teacher Consultants will focus on the following: research on literacy issues; exploration of best practices in the teaching of literacy to all students; theory and practice of providing leadership for teachers who use reading, writing, and thinking in the courses they teach. Students who successfully complete the Practicum will become teacher/consultants for the Connecticut Writing Project: Fairfield. Previously ED 0501.

EDUC 6512 Contemporary Schooling in Society 3 Credits

Candidates investigate and discuss current issues important to education, seeking to understand the relationship between the systemic nature of particular issues and their specific manifestations in local, national, and global arenas. In addition, candidates identify the ways that they, as educators and as citizens, attend to these issues at the local level. Previously ED 0512.

EDUC 6515 Economic and Physical Geography 3 Credits

Economic geography is closely connected to physical geography - the central issue being uneven distribution of resources on a global scale. These resources, be they natural, human or capital resources, constitute the economic interactions of not only nations, but of the past, present, and future of human activities and planetary resource and environmental issues. Therefore, issues of development, poverty and wealth, environmental concerns that will affect the lives of today's students, their children, and their environment are addressed. Appropriate technologies and activities for 7-12 students are demonstrated. Previously ED 0515.

EDUC 6522 Learning and the Child's Experience 3 Credits

Prerequisite: EDUC 5405 or EDUC 5437 or EDUC 5447 or EDUC 5497.

Drawing from classic and current cross-disciplinary theory and practice, candidates in this course gain a comprehensive, culturally sensitive knowledge of how children and young adolescents in the elementary grades learn, think, and interact as social beings. Candidates consider the development of individual children within the larger context of educational institutions. Beginning with an introduction of Piaget's and Vygotsky's frameworks for the understanding of development, candidates further explore constructivism and socio-historical cultural views of learning as they consider the relevance of theory for teaching practices. Previously ED 0522.

EDUC 6530 Assessment and Differentiated Instruction 3 Credits

Teacher candidates in this course will become familiar with principles and techniques necessary to plan, select, administer, interpret, and assess a differentiated range of student learning activities and instructional methods. Candidates will learn to use traditional norm-referenced instruments, curriculum-based assessments, formal observations, interviews, criterion-referenced assessments, and other alternative assessments to guide differentiated planning and instruction. Previously ED 0530.

EDUC 6534 Theories of Learning 3 Credits

This course presents a detailed consideration of the positions on the nature and conditions of human learning found in the principal schools of psychology and in contemporary research. Crosslisted with PSYG 6534. Previously ED 0534.

EDUC 6545 Developing Integrated Curriculum for Elementary Students: Inquiry and Action 3 Credits

Prerequisites: At least two courses from EDUC 5437, EDUC 5447, EDUC 5497.

Guided by current research and practice in pedagogy, human development, and multicultural education, candidates in this course design socially responsible, inquiry and action-oriented, interdisciplinary curriculum units that develop content knowledge, inquiry tools, technological competence, social responsibility, and critical thinking. Fieldwork in local 3-6 classrooms required.

EDUC 6552 Research for Action and Advocacy in School and Community Settings 3 Credits

Prerequisite: Completion of all other MA requirements.

This course is designed for pre-service and certified teachers, community leaders, and professionals from allied fields to learn action research methodologies by engaging in authentic action research projects in schools and/or community settings. Through critical self-reflection, discussions, and review of relevant literature, candidates in this course gain knowledge and competence in designing and implementing socially responsible research through advocacy projects. This course is part of a six-credit sequence, paired with EDUC 6999. Previously ED 0552.

EDUC 6559 Empowering Struggling Readers and Writers in the Elementary Grades 3 Credits

In this course, elementary teacher candidates work to meet the literacy learning needs of struggling learners. Under the guidance of certified literacy specialists, candidates assess learning needs, and, in collaboration with classroom teachers and appropriate specialists, provide instructional interventions for individuals or small groups of struggling readers and writers. A minimum of 25 hours of fieldwork are required. Enrollment by permission only. Previously ED 0559.

EDUC 6561 Summer Institute in the Teaching of Writing 0-4 Credits

This institute is for experienced teachers, grades K-12, in all disciplines. Participants will become familiar with contemporary theory regarding all aspects of literacy with emphasis on composition theory. In addition, participants will explore best practices that extend theory into the classroom. A primary focus for inquiry will be on language of students for whom English is a second language and for low income students. In addition, participants will explore literary issues through their own writing and through independent research in an area of study that is appropriate to their professional needs. All participants who want advanced training as presenters and literacy leaders in Fairfield and New Haven school districts will be encourage to apply for the practicum following the institute. Previously ED 0561.

EDUC 6572 Guided Research in Science 3 Credits

Working closely with both a science education and faculty member in physics, chemistry, or biology (depending on licensure field), science education candidates engage in a guided research project. Candidates learn and use the most recent skills and tools of research in their certification area and demonstrate their ability to understand research and successfully design, conduct, report, and evaluate investigations in science. As part of their course requirements, candidates synthesize their research in the form of a scientific paper and develop a unit of instruction that integrates findings from their research and engages 7-12 students in the processes of research in the field. Previously ED 0572.

EDUC 6573 Instructional Issues in Teaching Science 3 Credits

Teacher candidates seeking secondary science certification must enroll in an advanced science methods course focusing on contemporary issues in science education. This course will provide candidates with the opportunity to learn the conceptual foundations of current approaches to science instruction and professional development especially as related to student learning at the secondary level. Contemporary issues central to the course include but are not limited to: science education standards, science education reform efforts, equity in science education, teaching through inquiry and assessment strategies in science education. The course will offer students opportunities for active learning and reflection and the construction of new understanding regarding science teaching and learning. This course will also require students to take part in a research component focusing on a particular science education issue of their choice. They will begin a literature review and propose a research project which they may complete if they chose the Master's thesis option. Previously ED 0573.

EDUC 6575 Theory and Practice of Integrated Curriculum Design 3 Credits

In this course candidates explore theories of critical pedagogy design and teaching. They develop and implement differentiated, culturally sensitive inquiry and action-oriented interdisciplinary curriculum units. Candidates learn to develop students' content knowledge, inquiry tools, technological competence, social responsibility, and critical thinking. Current emphasis in this course is on integrating science, social studies and health curricula. This is an advanced course for those already certified or MA degree-only candidates. Previously ED 0575.

EDUC 6579 Directed Observation for Secondary DSAP Candidates: Part I 3 Credits

This is part one of a two-semester course designed for those candidates working in the public secondary schools under a DSAP. Each course offers a semester-long experience in a public secondary school for qualified candidates. Participants engage in teaching five days each week. Emphasized concepts include classroom management dynamics, teaching techniques, lesson plan organization, and faculty duties. Candidates receive assistance from their university supervisor who observes and evaluates each candidate a minimum of three times. The instructor collaborates with the candidate to keep a line of communication open with the mentor for the candidate and with those assigned to assess the candidate at the district level. District evaluations are submitted to the instructor. Candidates must obtain permission to take this course from their program coordinator at the beginning of the previous semester. Enrollment by permission only. Previously ED 0579.

EDUC 6580 Directed Observation for Secondary DSAP Candidates: Part II 3 Credits

Prerequisites: EDUC 6579; completion of certification course requirements and all subject area requirements.

This is part two of a two-semester course designed for those candidates working in the public secondary schools under a DSAP. Each course offers a semester-long experience in a public secondary school for qualified candidates. Participants engage in teaching five days each week. Emphasized concepts include classroom management dynamics, teaching techniques, lesson plan organization, and faculty duties. Candidates receive assistance from their university supervisor who observes and evaluates each candidate a minimum of three times. The instructor collaborates with the candidate to keep a line of communication open with the mentor for the candidate and with those assigned to assess the candidate at the district level. District evaluations are submitted to the instructor. Candidates must obtain permission to take this course from their program coordinator at the beginning of the previous semester. Open only to candidates who have been formally accepted into the Teacher Preparation program. Previously ED 0580.

EDUC 6581 Directed Observation and Supervised Student Teaching: Secondary Education 6 Credits

Prerequisites: Formal acceptance into Teacher Preparation program and completion of all certification course requirements.

This course offers a semester-long experience in a local school for qualified candidates in secondary teaching. Participants engage in observation and teaching five days each week. Emphasized concepts include classroom management dynamics, teaching techniques, lesson plan organization, and faculty duties. Candidates receive assistance from their university supervisors and the cooperating teacher(s), who must observe and evaluate each student. Candidates must register with the director of student teaching placement at the beginning of the previous semester. Previously ED 0581.

EDUC 6583 Elementary Student Teaching: Immersion in a Community of Practice 6 Credits

This course offers a stimulating semester-long experience in an elementary school classroom within a local priority school district. Under the guidance of university supervision and intensive mentoring by cooperating teachers, participants quickly assume full teaching responsibilities, including curriculum and lesson planning anchored in the principles of multicultural education and social responsibility, differentiated instruction, and effective organization and management, while carrying out other faculty duties, including participation in school governance and professional development. As educators for social justice and social responsibility, they engage in related school and community-based activities with students, families, and community members. Participants must register with the director of student teaching placement at the beginning of the previous semester. Enrollment requires performance-based assessment including, but not limited to, successful completion of all prerequisite certification track courses and requirements while a matriculated candidate in the Elementary Education MA program, permission of the elementary education program director, and an interview with the director of student teaching placements. Previously ED 0583.

EDUC 6584 Reflective Practice Seminar: Elementary Education 3 Credits

Participants take this weekly seminar concurrently with student teaching. Although much of the seminar's subject matter flows from the ongoing student-teaching experience, it deliberately addresses issues such as socially responsible teaching, professional disposition and habits of mind, teacher research, school governance, mandated Connecticut testing, classroom management, conflict resolution, communication with parents/caregivers, sensitivity to multicultural issues, and special education. The course stresses continued reflective practice and professional development, including development of a professional portfolio, continued study and research, and establishing a supportive collegial network. Previously ED 0584.

EDUC 6585 Supervised Teaching, Learning, and Reflection in a Community of Practice: Part I 3 Credits

This course is the first of a two-semester supervised experience designed for candidates for whom traditional student teaching is not appropriate because they are currently teaching in an elementary school. The evaluative tools used align with those used for student teaching and BEST assessment. In addition, the course incorporates monthly seminar meetings. Although much of the seminar's subject matter flows from the ongoing teaching experience, it deliberately addresses issues such as socially responsible teaching, professional disposition and habits of mind, teacher research, school governance, classroom management, conflict resolution, communication with parents/caregivers, and sensitivity to multicultural issues and inclusion. Continued professional development is stressed, including development of a professional portfolio, continued study and research, and establishing a supportive collegial network. Under the guidance of university supervision, teacher candidates assume full teaching responsibilities, including curriculum and lesson planning anchored in the principles of multicultural education and social responsibility, differentiated instruction, and effective organization and management, while carrying out other faculty duties, including participation in school governance and professional development. As educators for social justice and social responsibility, they engage in related school and community-based activities with students, families, and community members. Enrollment requires state-approved waiver of student teaching; performance-based assessment, including but not limited to successful completion of at least 27 prerequisite certification track credits and related course requirements while a matriculated candidate in the Elementary Education MA program, and permission of the Elementary Education program director. Previously ED 0585.

EDUC 6586 Supervised Teaching, Learning, and Reflection in a Community of Practice: Part II 3 Credits

Prerequisite: EDUC 6585.

This course is the second of a two-semester supervised experience designed for candidates for whom traditional student teaching is not appropriate because they are currently teaching in an elementary school. Part one must be taken during the preceding semester. The evaluative tools used align with those used for student teaching and BEST assessment. In addition, the course incorporates monthly seminar meetings. Although much of the seminar's subject matter flows from the ongoing teaching experience, it deliberately addresses issues such as socially responsible teaching, professional disposition and habits of mind, teacher research, school governance, classroom management, conflict resolution, communication with parents/caregivers, and sensitivity to multicultural issues and inclusion. Continued professional development is stressed, including development of a professional portfolio, continued study and research, and establishing a supportive collegial network. Under the guidance of University supervision, teacher candidates assume full teaching responsibilities including curriculum and lesson planning anchored in the principles of multicultural education and social responsibility, differentiated instruction, and effective organization and management; while carrying out other faculty duties, including participation in school governance and professional development. As educators for social justice and social responsibility, they engage in related school and community-based activities with students, families and community members. Previously ED 0586.

EDUC 6589 English Seminar 3 Credits

Candidates take this weekly seminar concurrently with student teaching or during the first semester of full-time teaching as a DSAP teacher. The seminar supports English teacher candidates to enact best practices in English education, helping them to select and review curricula, develop lessons and assessments for diverse learners, and work with struggling or difficult students. Weekly discussions draw on the teaching issues and problems faced by the English teacher candidates. The seminar also addresses more general school issues, such as the culture and organization schools, mandated Connecticut group-wide testing, classroom management, conflict resolution, communication with parents and caregivers, sensitivity to multicultural issues, and issues of inclusion. The job application process, including resume writing, interviewing skills, and developing a professional portfolio and teaching portfolio, are also addressed. Candidates receive information on the certification process. Previously ED 0589.

EDUC 6590 Reflective Research Practicum in Teaching 3 Credits

Participants solve a practical problem in classroom teaching by applying educational research to a specific school situation. Previously ED 0590.

EDUC 6591 Mathematics Seminar 3 Credits

Candidates take this weekly seminar concurrently with student teaching or during the first semester of full-time teaching as a DSAP teacher. The seminar supports mathematics teacher candidates to enact best practices in mathematics education, helping them to select and review curricula, develop lessons and assessments for diverse learners, and work with struggling or difficult students. Weekly discussions draw on the teaching issues and problems faced by the mathematics teacher candidates. The seminar also addresses more general school issues, such as the culture and organization schools, mandated Connecticut group-wide testing, classroom management, conflict resolution, communication with parents and caregivers, sensitivity to multicultural issues, and issues of inclusion. The job application process, including resume writing, interviewing skills, and developing a professional portfolio and teaching portfolio, are also addressed. Candidates receive information on the certification process. Previously ED 0591.

EDUC 6592 Science Seminar 3 Credits

Candidates take this weekly seminar concurrently with student teaching or during the first semester of full-time teaching as a DSAP teacher. The seminar supports science teacher candidates to enact best practices in science education, helping them to select and review curricula, develop lessons and assessments for diverse learners, and work with struggling or difficult students. Weekly discussions draw on the teaching issues and problems faced by the science teacher candidates. The seminar also addresses more general school issues, such as the culture and organization schools, mandated Connecticut group-wide testing, classroom management, conflict resolution, communication with parents and caregivers, sensitivity to multicultural issues, and issues of inclusion. The job application process, including resume writing, interviewing skills, and developing a professional portfolio and teaching portfolio are also addressed. Candidates receive information on the certification process. Previously ED 0592.

EDUC 6593 World Language Seminar 3 Credits

Candidates take this weekly seminar concurrently with student teaching or during the first semester of full-time teaching as a DSAP teacher. The seminar supports world language teacher candidates to enact best practices in world language education, helping them to select and review curricula, develop lessons and assessments for diverse learners, and work with struggling or difficult students. Weekly discussions draw on the teaching issues and problems faced by the world language teacher candidates. The seminar also addresses more general school issues, such as the culture and organization schools, mandated Connecticut group-wide testing, classroom management, conflict resolution, communication with parents and caregivers, sensitivity to multicultural issues, and issues of inclusion. The job application process, including resume writing, interviewing skills, and developing a professional portfolio and teaching portfolio, are also addressed. Candidates receive information on the certification process. Previously ED 0593.

EDUC 6594 Social Studies/History Seminar 3 Credits

Candidates take this weekly seminar concurrently with student teaching or during the first semester of full-time teaching as a DSAP teacher. The seminar supports social studies/history teacher candidates to enact best practices in social studies/history education, helping them to select and review curricula, develop lessons and assessments for diverse learners, and work with struggling or difficult students. Weekly discussions draw on the teaching issues and problems faced by the social studies/history teacher candidates. The seminar also addresses more general school issues, such as the culture and organization schools, mandated Connecticut group-wide testing, classroom management, conflict resolution, communication with parents and caregivers, sensitivity to multicultural issues, and issues of inclusion. The job application process, including resume writing, interviewing skills, and developing a professional portfolio and teaching portfolio, are also addressed. Candidates receive information on the certification process. Previously ED 0594.

EDUC 6598 edTPA Portfolio 0 Credits

Fee: $300

Prerequisite: Completion of all certification coursework.

This course provides students with strategies for the development of their edTPA portfolio. It is taken in conjunction with the following student teaching and DSAP seminars: EDUC 6584, EDUC 6589, EDUC 6591, EDUC 6592, EDUC 6593, EDUC 6594, SPED 6954, TSLA 6582. Previously ED 0598.

EDUC 6599 Professional Writing Seminar: Product of Learning 1-3 Credits

Prerequisite: Completion of student teaching.

During this seminar, candidates complete a self-designed Product of Learning. Under advisement of the program faculty, candidates produce a learning outcome that relates directly to their future work as an educator (i.e., design an elective course in their field, submit a manuscript for publication, deliver a presentation at a regional or national conference, etc. Math candidates must complete the problem-solving portfolio for their product. Consult with advisor for information) Candidates are expected to develop authentic educational products, with the expectation that candidate-generated products will become contributions to the candidate's specialty area (i.e., English Education, Social Studies Education, etc). The process for this product will be supported in a 10-hour writing seminar course that, with substantial independent work, would be supervised by faculty editorial and revision input toward the development of worthy professional products. Students will be encouraged to work alongside peers who are also completing the Product of Learning. Previously ED 0599.

EDUC 6990 Independent Study 3 Credits

This course requires self-selected activity by qualified candidates under faculty supervision. Options include field studies or library research with in-depth study of a problem for a specified time. Each candidate submits a preliminary proposal, detailed research design, and a comprehensive report and evaluation. The course requires frequent consultation with the faculty advisor. Previously ED 0595.

EDUC 6999 Capstone: Educating for Social Responsibility and Civic Engagement 3 Credits

Drawing on contemporary educational theory, best practices, and Jesuit education traditions, this capstone seminar builds upon previous courses and culminates integrative experiences from previous classes for approved candidates in the MA in Elementary Education, MA in Secondary Education, and MA in Teaching and Foundations programs. As participants in a community of learners, candidates will demonstrate their capacities as reflective scholar-practitioners who synthesize program learning to produce an Integrative Master's Project that builds on work initiated in EDUC 6552: Research in Action and Advocacy in School and Community Settings. This course is part of a two-part sequence with EDUC 6552 that explores the ways educational professionals can promote social responsibility in their work with schools, communities, and families. Previously ED 0511.