School of Record for American Institute for Foreign Study in Austria

ANTH/AHST 304: Austrian Folk Art and Folk Customs                     3 Credits

Prerequisite: One college level Anthropology or Art History Course, plus intermediate-level cultural anthropology

School of Record Articulation: Intermediate Level Anthropology

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a survey of Austrian Folk Art and Folk Customs embedded in the broader field of cultural anthropology and the “minor arts”. The main emphasis will be on material and non-material culture in the Alpine Region: belief systems, annual cycle (calendar year, church year), lifetime cycle, traditions, rituals, customs, making a living (agriculture, hunting, craftsmanship etc.) daily life past and present, (tools and techniques, nutrition= eating and drinking, healing arts, festivities, entertainment), built environment (architecture), costumes (“Tracht”, Lederhosen and Dirndl), folk art, music, literature etc.

ENGL 302: Concepts of Heroism in Western Culture                        3 Credits

Prerequisite: One college level English or Literature course

School of Record Articulation: Beginner Level English

This course analyses concepts of heroism as expressed in literature (and popular culture, esp. film, and opera) of six different epochs: Classical/Mythological, Medieval, Renaissance, Age of Reason, Romantic and Modern. A general introduction dealing with the universal elements and structure of heroic myths will be followed by the analysis of examples which will include such heroic archetypes as Odysseus, Heracles, Beowulf, Siegfried, Don Juan, Don Quixote, Hamlet, Robinson Crusoe, and Faust, but also Melville’s Captain Ahab (“Moby Dick”). There will also be a discussion of Saint Joan, the French national heroine and the only historical character in this class, and finally of the reversal of the heroic concept into that of the anti-hero in 20th century literature (Kafka, Camus). Another topic is the (mis)use of heroes and heroic ideals for political purposes and in times of war.

GERM 101: Elementary German I                             3 Credits

Prerequisite: N/A

School of Record Articulation: Beginner Level German

An introduction to the German language for those with little or no previous experience, the course teaches essential vocabulary and grammar and helps students develop an ability to communicate in an authentic linguistic context.

GERM 102: Elementary German II                            3 Credits

Prerequisite: GERM 101: Elementary German I

School of Record Articulation: Beginner Level German

Designed for students who already have some knowledge of German, the course revises basic grammar and vocabulary before progressing to more complex structures and functions leading up to the next, Intermediate, level. Classes are conducted mainly in German, with ample opportunity for student oral practice.

GERM 201: Intermediate German I                          3 Credits

Prerequisite: GERM 102: Elementary German II

School of Record Articulation: Intermediate Level German

An intermediate level of German language. Topics include grammar, communication and speaking techniques, listening comprehension, analyzing texts and training in everyday situations typical of students studying at the University. Basic grammar is a prerequisite although a brief review is given at the start of the course.

GERM 301: Intermediate German II                        3 Credits

Prerequisite: GERM 201: Intermediate German I

School of Record Articulation: Intermediate Level German

This course builds upon the skills gained in Intermediate German I and develops them further in order to enable students to understand and express personal and family information and to communicate matters regarding topics of everyday life, such as hobbies, clothing, body and health as well as personal areas of study and interest. Classes are conducted in German, with ample opportunity for student oral practice.

GERM 401: Advanced German                                   3 Credits

Prerequisite: GERM 301: Intermediate German II

School of Record Articulation: Intermediate Level German

This course builds upon the skills gained in Intermediate German II and develops them to enable students to understand and respond to quite complex lines of argument, both in oral and in written form. Students are introduced to more complex forms of grammar and more sophisticated vocabulary, to give them the ability to carry out and refine tasks within the world of German, using the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.

ECON/POLI 320: International Political Economy                              3 Credits

Prerequisite: One college level Political Science or Economics course

School of Record Articulation: Intermediate Level Politics

This course aims to examine the relationship between the political realm and the economy, especially in modern international affairs. The link between international politics and the economy of our current globalised world is studied with regard to competing theories as well as to competing economic orders. Students will have the opportunity to explore major topics from the field of International Political Economy (IPE); including the classics of the main schools of IPE, among them the theories of Realism, Liberalism and Marxism as well as the approaches of Keynesianism and Monetarism. The course will also deal with the history of the management of international economic relations (esp. since 1945), with various concepts of power in international politics and the key institutions of today’s global economic system (such as WTO, World Bank and IMF). Last but not least, the course will focus on current developments and problems of IPE, among them critical evaluations of globalization, questions of environmental policy and roots of the economic crisis.

MUSC 301: Music in the Age of Mozart                  3 Credits

Prerequisite: Intro to music history, plus intermediate-level music history or course focused on Baroque and Classical period, or advisor approval (or equivalent)

School of Record Articulation: Intermediate Level General Elective

This course will relate the music of an era to historical events and to the art and literature of the time period discussed. The discussion of composers’ lives, individual styles and representative works aim not merely to impart facts, but stimulate curiosity and enthusiasm. Although the course provides an overview of the whole Baroque and Classical period, emphasis is laid on Mozart, Salzburg’s genius loci, and students will be able to re-live much of what is taught by course-related field trips in Salzburg and Vienna.

PHIL 301: The Modern European Mind                  3 Credits

Prerequisite: One college level Philosophy course

School of Record Articulation: Intermediate Level Philosophy

This course explores the making of the modern European mind and therefore deals with the history of philosophical ideas. It covers influential approaches towards society and politics from the Renaissance to our contemporary era and shows how the works of great philosophers contributed to the formation of modern ethics, political ideologies and a specific European mindset. We will read and discuss works of writers who made an important impact in the history of ideas. Among these thinkers are big names like the infamous Machiavelli, Enlightenment men of letters (like Voltaire and Rousseau), idealists (like Kant and Hegel), liberals (like Bentham and Mill), conservatives (like Burke), socialists (like Marx and Engels) and famous philosophers of science (like Popper).

HIST/POLI 325: The Rise of the Right: A History of Fascism                           3 Credits

Prerequisite: Intro History or Political Science course plus intermediate European History course, or advisor approval (or equivalent)

School of Record Articulation: Intermediate Level History

A comparative study of European and non-European far right movements from the end of WWI to the present. Focus on a variety of fascist and other authoritarian movements in Europe and other countries. Topics will be the ideologies of the far right, historical forms of fascism, the return of far right parties in Western Europe; neo-Nazi violence and the growth of the radical right in the former communist countries.

HIST 301: World War II and Central Europe                         3 Credits

Prerequisite: Introductory history course, plus intermediate European history course or equivalent (or advisor approval)

School of Record Articulation: Intermediate Level History

The course will focus on nationalism and the construction of national identity as a key element of the 20th century in Europe. It will explore how nationalism created the context and ideas in which World War II erupted and the examine how WWII affected especially the multi-national area of Central Europe as well as how the trauma of WWII influenced the re-building of nations after 1945 and the creation of founding myths and collective memories (“master narratives”) of peoples on each sides of the Iron Curtain and the transformations of these narratives since the end of the Cold War. Until today, WWII plays a crucial role in the collective as well as the individual memories of the people in Central Europe. An important objective of the course will be a transnational comparison of such memories with a special focus on Austria.