Master of Business Administration

An MBA is meant to be a generalist degree that covers all the relevant topical areas and gives students the opportunity to specialize, but not major, in a functional area of business. The MBA program at the Dolan School includes core courses, breadth modules, concentration courses, and a required elective course.

The core courses are designed to provide fundamental tools and functional area competencies for students who did not major in a business specialty as undergraduates, did not perform well academically as undergraduates, or took only a portion of the functional and tool courses that comprise the MBA core. For example, a student who majored in economics as an undergraduate probably has sufficient background in economics, mathematics, and statistics, but lacks course work in marketing, accounting, finance, organizational behavior, etc. Therefore, the economics major would need to complete the missing core courses in order to have the same set of fundamental competencies as a student who majored in a business discipline. This is called "leveling," where everyone starts at the same level, or nearly so, before they go on to take advanced coursework.

In order to maximize one's competence and confidence as a manager, every student is required to complete courses in four breadth modules. Each module is designed to develop a specific skill set: decision metrics, insights and analysis, ethical leadership, and strategic decision-making (global and financial). The required courses contained within each module cover the most relevant discipline knowledge to foster effective managerial decision-making.

Every Dolan MBA student identifies a concentration, enabling the students to become "discipline experts." The concentration requires completion of four advanced level courses from one of the following disciplines: accounting, finance, information systems/business analytics, management, or marketing. It is possible in some concentrations to earn a specialization if the student completes four specific upper-level courses. For example, a student with an accounting concentration can choose four tax courses and earn the taxation specialization. 

Course Waiver Policy

Students admitted to the Dolan MBA program may be able to waive up to all six core courses on the basis of successful completion (i.e., final grades of B or better) of undergraduate business courses. The student's undergraduate degree must have been earned within five years from an AACSB-accredited business school from the date of enrollment in the graduate program for those undergraduate courses to be considered for waivers.

Computer Usage

All students are expected to demonstrate and/or attain proficiency in the use of computers during their program of study. Usage is integrated throughout the curriculum and it is expected in each course. The School provides fully equipped computer labs for student use, and each student must obtain a NetID account for access to the University's online systems.

Requirements

Core Courses 1
AC 0400Introduction to Accounting3
FI 0400Principles of Finance3
MG 0400Organizational Behavior3
MK 0400Marketing Management3
OM 0400Principles of Business Analytics3
QA 0400Applied Business Statistics3
Breadth Modules Courses
AC 0500Accounting Information for Decision-Making3
FI 0500Shareholder Value3
IS 0500Information Systems and Database Management3
MG 0500Leadership3
MG 0503Legal and Ethical Environment of Business3
MK 0500Customer Value3
MG 0584Global Competitive Strategy3
Concentrations
Select a concentration in one of the following areas: 212
Accounting 3
Finance
Information Systems and Business Analytics
Management
Marketing
Elective
Select one additional graduate business course3
Total Credits54
1

Core courses are required to be taken before breadth and concentration courses.

2

At least one concentration course must be designated as a research course. (See the section on MBA concentrations below.)

3

Only students with a bachelor's degree in accounting or the equivalent may pursue this concentration.

MBA Concentrations

Accounting Concentration

Specialization Option: Taxation

To be eligible for admission to this area of concentration, students must have an undergraduate degree (BS or BA) with a major in accounting or the equivalent. The equivalent of an undergraduate degree in accounting includes the successful completion of: intermediate accounting (six credits), advanced accounting (three credits), cost accounting (three credits), auditing (three credits), and taxation (three credits). Deficiencies will be handled on a case-by-case basis.

Required Concentration Course
Select one of the following:3
Issues in a Regulatory Reporting Environment 1
Research on Contemporary Issues in Accounting 1
Tax Planning 2
Elective Concentration Courses
Select three courses from the following: 39
International Accounting
Accounting for Governments, Hospitals, and Universities
Accounting Information Systems and Technology
Issues in Internal Audit
Audit Issues in a Global Environment
Forensic Accounting
Issues in Accounting Ethics
Financial Statement Analysis
Seminar: Special Topics in Accounting
Independent Study
Tax Research
Tax Accounting
Tax of Property Transactions
Entity Taxation
Corporate Tax II
Estate and Gift Taxation
Income Taxation of Trusts and Estates
Partnership Taxation
State and Local Taxation
International Taxation
Tax Practice and Procedure
Contemporary Topics in Taxation
Practicum in Taxation
Independent Study
Total Credits12
1

Designated research course.

2

Designated research course ONLY if choosing the taxation specialization.

3

In consultation with the Coordinator of Graduate Accounting programs, the student chooses either 3 accounting courses or 3 taxation courses (if seeking a taxation specialization).

Finance Concentration

Required Concentration Courses
FI 0530Corporate Finance3
FI 0540Investment Analysis 13
Elective Concentration Courses
Select two courses from the following:6
Portfolio Management
International Financial Management 1
Global Financial Markets and Institutions
Derivative Securities 1
Fixed Income Securities
Capital Budgeting
Financial Risk Management
Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Finance
Total Credits12
1

Designated research course.

Information Systems and Business Analytics Concentration

Students in the Information Systems and Business Analytics concentration take four courses: three advanced graduate courses from the department (IS, OM, QA), and one advanced (500-level) graduate course from any department in the School of Business.

Elective Concentration Courses
Select three courses from the following:9
Python for Business Analytics
Databases for Business Analytics
Project Management
Data Mining and Business Intelligence
Business Analytics and Big Data Management
Contemporary Topics in Information Systems and Operations Management 1
Independent Study in Information Systems and Operations Management
Business Model Optimization 1
Process Improvement and Quality Management 1
Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management
Business Forecasting and Predictive Analytics 1
Free Elective
Select one 500-level course from any business discipline3
Total Credits12
1

Designated research course.

Management Concentration

Specialization Options: Strategic HR or Global Strategy, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship

Required Concentration Course
MG 0504Managing People for Competitive Advantage3
Elective Concentration Courses
Select three courses from the following:9
Human Resource Strategies: An Analytics Approach 2
Organizational Culture
Negotiations and Dispute Resolution 2
Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation: The Entrepreneurial Firm
The Law of Commercial Transactions: Advanced Studies in the Uniform Commerical Code
Diversity in the Workplace
Performance Management
Entrepreneurship
Social Entrepreneurship
International Human Resources Management
Cross-Cultural Management 1
Law and Human Resources Management
International Business Law and Regulation
Labor Relations
Career Planning and Development 2
Contemporary Topics in Management and Human Resources
Contemporary Topics in Human Resources Management 2
Total Credits12
1

Designated research course.

2

Course is applicable for the Strategic HR specialization.

Marketing Concentration

Specialization Option: Marketing Analytics

Required Concentration Courses
MK 0510Customer Behavior3
MK 0520Marketing Research 1, 23
Elective Concentration Courses
Select two courses from the following:6
Building Brand Equity
Advertising Management
Global Marketing
Business-to-Business Marketing in the Internet Economy
Digital Marketing
Multivariate Data Analysis for Decision Making 2
Experimental Research in Marketing 2
Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Marketing 2
Total Credits12
1

Designated research course.

2

Course is applicable for the Marketing Analytics specialization.

Overall Program Requirements

Core Courses18
Breadth Modules Courses21
Concentration Courses12
Elective3
Total Credits54

Residency Requirement

A minimum of 36 graduate credit hours must be completed at Fairfield University for the MBA degree.

Accounting

AC 0400 Introduction to Accounting3 Credits

This course examines the basic concepts necessary to understand the information provided by financial and managerial accounting systems. The focus is on interpretation of basic information, as students learn about internal and external financial reporting. Topics include: accrual accounting; revenue and expense recognition; accounting for assets, liabilities, and equities; accumulation and assignment of costs to products and services; and budgeting.

AC 0500 Accounting Information for Decision-Making3 Credits

Prerequisite: AC 0400.

This course emphasizes the use of accounting information by managers for decision-making. It is designed to provide managers with the skills necessary to interpret analytical information supplied by the financial and managerial accounting systems. Financial accounting concepts based on profit, liquidity, solvency, and capital structure are used in the process of employing management accounting tools to decisions and evaluate organization performance and changes in cost, profit and investment centers.

AC 0510 Issues in a Regulatory Reporting Environment3 Credits

This course brings together technical accounting and reporting concepts and theories with a focus on the financial accounting information that is required to be filed with regulatory agencies, the most predominant being the Securities and Exchange Commission. This course aims to provide an in-depth conceptual understanding of regulatory reporting requirements coupled with an appreciation of how these regulations affect the quality of information in publicly available corporate reports. Students will enhance their ability to analyze and understand unique and complex future accounting issues and possible solutions. The course is taught seminar style with students leading the discussions of cases and research.

AC 0520 International Accounting3 Credits

The primary focus of this course is the study of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). Particular emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of significant differences between the current United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and IFRS standards. Students will also learn the pros and cons of U.S. GAAP and IFRS approaches for select technical accounting issues. Some other non-IFRS related topics include International Taxation, International Transfer pricing and the impact of culture on the development of accounting standards and practices throughout the world.

AC 0530 Accounting for Governments, Hospitals, and Universities3 Credits

This course examines the generally accepted accounting principles applicable to governmental entities (as issued by GASB) as well as accounting principles applicable to not-for-profit entities (as issued by FASB). The focus will be on the financial statements and reports prepared by state and local governments and financial reporting for the wide array of not-for-profit entities with an emphasis on the contrast of these entities with for-profit accounting.

AC 0550 Accounting Information Systems and Technology3 Credits

This course analyzes the methods used to capture, process, and communicate accounting information in a modern business enterprise. Students learn to document business transaction cycles, identify weaknesses, and recommend internal control improvements. They may design and build a module of an accounting information system using appropriate database technology.

AC 0555 Issues in Internal Audit3 Credits

This course covers internal audit from a broad perspective. Course topics cover three main areas, internal audit: (1) basics, (2) risks, and (3) metrics. During the course, students will develop critical thinking skills (particularly employing professional skepticism) and learn to effectively communicate their professional opinions.

AC 0560 Audit Issues in a Global Environment3 Credits

This course will expose students to the global profession of auditing, with a primary focus on public company auditors. Topics will vary any given semester, but may include the following: the different international organizations that set auditing standards and enforce auditing standards; the impact of culture on auditing standards and practices throughout the world; the impact of International Financial Reporting Standards on international and U.S. auditing rules; the evaluation of audit evidence; auditor independence; materiality; internal controls; computer assisted audit tools and techniques; fraud detection and forensic accounting. The course is taught seminar style, with students leading the discussions of cases and current articles. Assignments are designed to develop students' written and oral communication skills, analytical skills, and critical thinking skills.

AC 0565 Forensic Accounting3 Credits

This course provides students with a foundation in investigative accounting. Topics covered include identifying, investigating and documenting fraud and providing litigation support for forensic engagements. With an emphasis on case analyses and/or independent research, students taking the course will have the opportunity to improve their critical thinking and written and oral communication skills, particularly as they relate to the legal settings associated with investigative accounting. Only open to students enrolled in the MS Accounting, MBA Accounting, MBA Taxation, or Accounting Graduate Certificate program.

AC 0570 Issues in Accounting Ethics3 Credits

This course investigates ethical problems in contemporary accounting practice. The goal is to increase students' ethical perception so they are better able to identify, consider, and ultimately act on the ethical issues they may face in their professional accounting career, regardless of specialty area (e.g., audit, tax, and corporate accounting). The course is taught seminar style, with students leading the discussions of cases and current articles. Assignments are designed to develop students' written and oral communication skills, analytical skills, and critical thinking skills.

AC 0580 Financial Statement Analysis3 Credits

The course is designed to increase and extend the knowledge of the student in financial statement information and topics introduced in undergraduate courses in intermediate and advanced financial accounting through lecture, problem solving and case analysis. A critical examination of both objective and subjective aspects of financial reporting will be undertaken with both quantitative as well as qualitative assessments of financial information emphasized.

AC 0585 Seminar: Special Topics in Accounting3 Credits

This course presents recent practioner and academic literature in various areas of accounting, including guest speakers where appropriate. Topics change semester to semester, depending upon faculty and student interests.

AC 0590 Research on Contemporary Issues in Accounting3 Credits

This course is a designated research course. In it students will investigate, analyze, develop, and present recommendations for emerging issues, recent pronouncements of accounting rule-making bodies and/or unresolved controversies relating to contemporary financial reporting. In doing so, students will consider institutional, historical, and international perspectives. In their research, students are expected to use authoritative resources (e.g., FASB and/or IASB pronouncements). The course is taught seminar style, with students leading the discussions of cases and current articles. Assignments are designed to develop students' written and oral communication skills, analytical skills, and critical thinking skills.

AC 0591 Practicum in Accounting3 Credits

This course builds on the in-class lessons covered during the student's graduate studies by providing the student with the opportunity to apply his/her academic knowledge to a professional accounting context. As such, it is an experiential learning activity. Successful completion of the practicum will entitle students to three credits that count as a graduate-level accounting elective. Open only to students enrolled in the MS Accounting, MBA Accounting, or Accounting Graduate Certificate program. Enrollment by permission of the department chair or his/her designee. This course may not be repeated for credit.

AC 0598 Independent Study3 Credits

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop research skills while exploring a specific contemporary accounting issue with a full-time faculty member specializing in the area of the discipline. Students are expected to complete a significant research paper as the primary requirement of this course. Enrollment by permission from Department Chair or his or her designee only.

Finance

FI 0400 Principles of Finance3 Credits

Prerequisites: AC 0400; QA 0400.

This course examines the fundamental principles of modern finance that are helpful in understanding corporate finance, investments, and financial markets. More specifically, the course examines the time value of money; the functioning of capital markets; valuation of stocks, bonds, and corporate investments; risk measurement; and risk management. Students learn to use sources of financial data and spreadsheets to solve financial problems.

FI 0500 Shareholder Value3 Credits

Prerequisite: FI 0400.

This course examines business decision-making with the aim of creating and managing value for shareholders. Accordingly, students learn how to lead and manage a business in a competitive environment. This involves the formulation of corporate objectives and strategies, operational planning, and integration of various business functions leading to greater shareholder value. Topics include investment and strategic financial decision-making. A business simulation facilitates the learning process.

FI 0530 Corporate Finance3 Credits

This course provides an exploration of theoretical and empirical literature on corporate financial policies and strategies. More specifically, the course deals with corporate investment decisions, capital budgeting under uncertainty, capital structure and the cost of capital, dividends and stock repurchases, mergers and acquisitions, equity carve-outs, spin-offs, and risk management.

FI 0540 Investment Analysis3 Credits

This course examines the determinants of valuation for bonds, stocks, options, and futures, stressing the function of efficient capital markets in developing the risk-return tradeoffs essential to the valuation process.

FI 0545 Portfolio Management3 Credits

Prerequisite: FI 0540.

Students examine how individuals and firms allocate and finance their resources between risky and risk-free assets to maximize utility. Students use an overall model that provides the sense that the portfolio process is dynamic as well as adaptive. Topics include portfolio planning, investment analysis, and portfolio selection, evaluation, and revision.

FI 0555 International Financial Management3 Credits

Prerequisite: FI 0530.

The globalization of international financial markets presents international investors and multinational corporations with new challenges regarding opportunities and risks. This course examines the international financial environment of investments and corporate finance, evaluating the alternatives available to market participants in terms of risk and benefits. Topics include exchange rate determination, exchange rate exposure, basic financial equilibrium relationships, risk management including the use of currency options and futures, international capital budgeting and cost of capital, and short-term and international trade financing.

FI 0560 Global Financial Markets and Institutions3 Credits

Prerequisite: FI 0540.

This course examines financial markets in the context of their function in the economic system. The material deals with the complexity of the financial markets and the variety of financial institutions that have developed, stressing the dynamic nature of the financial world, which is continually evolving.

FI 0565 Derivative Securities3 Credits

Prerequisite: FI 0540.

This course offers in-depth coverage of financial derivative securities, such as options futures and swaps. The course focuses on the principles that govern the pricing of these securities as well as their uses in hedging, speculation, and arbitrage activities.

FI 0570 Fixed Income Securities3 Credits

Prerequisite: FI 0540.

This course deals extensively with the analysis and management of fixed income securities, which constitute almost two-thirds of the market value of all outstanding securities. The course provides an analysis of treasury and agency securities, corporate bonds, international bonds, mortgage-backed securities, and related derivatives. More specifically, this course provides an in-depth analysis of fixed income investment characteristics, modern valuation, and portfolio strategies.

FI 0575 Capital Budgeting3 Credits

Prerequisite: FI 0530.

This course examines the decision methods employed in long-term asset investment and capital budgeting policy. The course includes a study of quantitative methods used in the capital budgeting process: simulation, mixed integer programming, and goal programming. Students use these techniques and supporting computer software to address questions raised in case studies.

FI 0580 Financial Risk Management3 Credits

Prerequisite: FI 0540.

This course focuses on the evaluation and management of corporate and portfolio risk. More specifically, this course examines the methods of evaluating and managing risk with the objective of contributing to value maximization. Risk assessment methodologies such as value-at-risk (VaR) and cash-flow-at-risk (Car) are analyzed and used extensively.

FI 0585 Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Finance3 Credits

Prerequisites: FI 0530, FI 0540.

This course presents recent practitioner and academic literature in various areas of finance, including guest speakers where appropriate. Topics vary each semester to fit the interests of the seminar participants.

FI 0585A Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Finance: Financial Modeling3 Credits

FI 0585B Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Finance: Alternative Investments3 Credits

FI 0585C Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Finance: Trading3 Credits

FI 0585D Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Finance: Rotman Trading Competition3 Credits

FI 0595 Research Methods in Finance3 Credits

Prerequisite: FI 0540.

This course, open to MS in Finance students only, deals extensively with applied research methods in finance, a highly empirical discipline with practical relevance in the models and theories used. The central role of risk distinguishes research methodology in finance from the methodology used in other social sciences, necessitating the creation of new methods of investigation that are adopted by the finance industry at an astonishingly fast rate. For example, methods of assessing stationarity and long-run equilibrium, as well as methods measuring uncertainty, found a home in the finance area. This course covers traditional and new research methods that are directly, and in most instances, solely applicable to finance problems.

FI 0597 Independent Research Seminar3 Credits

Prerequisite: FI 0595.

This course, open to MS in Finance students only, provides participants with the opportunity to explore a financial topic of interest in depth, immersing students in detailed investigations requiring substantial research and analysis.

Information Systems

IS 0500 Information Systems and Database Management3 Credits

This course introduces the basic concepts and tools relevant to information systems and database management, and their enabling roles in business strategies and operations. Case studies are used to facilitate discussions of practical applications and issues involving strategic alignments of organizations, resource allocation, integration, planning, and analysis of cost, benefit and performance in light of the big data challenges. Specific emphases involve database design and implementation and emerging strategies and technologies such as business intelligence, big data management, web security, and online business analytics.

IS 0501 International Information Systems3 Credits

Prerequisite: IS 0500.

This course examines information technology environments around the world, and attendant challenges to business strategy and information systems design. The course identifies geographic and institutional variables that create borders in the global Internet economy: material infrastructures, socio-economic elements, and political-legal systems. The course emphasizes national and regional strategies, emergent technologies, hybrid systems, and equity issues.

IS 0505 Python for Business Analytics3 Credits

In this course, we introduce Python as a language and tool for collecting, preprocessing, and visualizing data for business analytics. since Python is one of the most popular programming languages, along with R, in data mining and business analytics, its fundamental programming logic and knowledge is essential for students to apply in data mining and to succeed in the job market. Specifically, this course focuses on the data-engineering phase, which includes collecting, preprocessing, and visualizing data, with respect to applications in business modeling, optimization, and statistical analysis. In addition, a number of mini projects will be used as vehicles to cover the main applications of data analytics, including recommender systems, text analytics, and web analytics.

IS 0510 Databases for Business Analytics3 Credits

Prerequisite: IS 0505.

This course introduces databases and data management in three parts. The first part covers basic database fundamentals. The second part is a hands-on introduction to Structured Query Language (SQL) for defining, manipulating, accessing, and managing data, accompanied by the basics of data modeling and normalization needed to ensure data integrity. The course concludes with a comprehensive database project that gives each student the opportunity to integrate and apply the new knowledge and skills learned from this class. Advanced topics such as distributed database systems, data services, and NoSQL databases are also discussed.

IS 0520 Project Management3 Credits

Prerequisite: IS 0500 or OM 0400.

This course explores the process and practice of project management. Topics to be covered include project lifecycle and organizations, teambuilding and productivity, task scheduling and resource allocation, and progress tracking and control. Cases will be used to consider the implications for change management, consulting, IT implementation, and other related disciplines. Small team projects and experiential exercises will also be used to provide an active learning environment. This course is designed to count toward professional project management certification.

IS 0540 Data Mining and Business Intelligence3 Credits

Prerequisites: IS 0510, OM 0500, QA 0500.

This course will change the way you think about data and its role in business. Businesses, governments, and individuals create massive collections of data as a byproduct of their activity. Increasingly, managers rely on intelligent technology to systematically analyze data to improve their decision-making. In many cases, automating analytical and decision-making processes is necessary because of the large volume of data and the speed with which new data are generated. In this course, we will examine how data analysis technologies can be used to improve managerial decision making. We will study the fundamental principles and techniques of data mining through real-world examples and cases to place data mining techniques in context, to develop data-analytic thinking, and to illustrate that proper application of these techniques is as much an art as it is a science. In addition, we will work "hands-on" with contemporary data mining software.

IS 0550 Business Analytics and Big Data Management3 Credits

Prerequisite: IS 0540.

This course will survey state-of-the-art topics in Big Data, looking at data collection (via smartphones, sensors, the Web), data storage and processing (scalable relational databases, Hadoop, Spark, etc.), extracting structured data from unstructured databases, systems issues (exploiting multicore, security), analytics (machine learning, data compression, efficient algorithms), data visualization, and a range of applications. Each of these five modules will introduce broad concepts as well as provide the most recent developments in the area.

IS 0585 Contemporary Topics in Information Systems and Operations Management3 Credits

Prerequisite: IS 0500.

This course draws from current literature and practice on information systems and/or operations management. The topics change from semester to semester, depending on student and faculty interest and may include: project management, e-business, management science with spreadsheets, e-procurement, executive information systems, ethics, and other socio-economic factors in the use of information technology.

IS 0585B Contemporary Topics: Advanced Data Mining Applications3 Credits

IS 0598 Independent Study in Information Systems and Operations Management3 Credits

This course provides an opportunity for students to complete a project or perform research under the direction of an Information Systems and Operations Management (ISOM) faculty member who has expertise in the topic being investigated. Students are expected to complete a significant project or research paper as the primary requirement of this course. Enrollment by permission of the ISOM Department Chair only.

Management

MG 0400 Organizational Behavior3 Credits

This course examines micro-level organizational behavior theories as applied to organizational settings. Topics include motivation, leadership, job design, interpersonal relations, group dynamics, communication processes, organizational politics, career development, and strategies for change at the individual and group levels. The course uses an experiential format to provide students with a simulated practical understanding of these processes in their respective organizations.

MG 0500 Leadership3 Credits

Prerequisite: MG 0400.

This course focuses intensively on the art and science of leadership in organizations by examining the critical links between leader skills, strategy, and organizational change utilizing a human resources approach. The course strives to assist students from every concentra­tion -- including finance, marketing, information systems, accounting, and international business -- to become leaders who can motivate and mobilize their people to focus on strategic goals. The material covered in this course will include traditional, contemporary, and strategic theories of leadership. Students will assess their leadership skills, and engage in a series of assign­ments designed to improve and establish confidence in their own abilities to lead.

MG 0503 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business3 Credits

This course helps students be more responsible and effective managers of the gray areas of business con­duct that call for normative judgment and action. The course is designed to develop skills in logical reasoning, argument, and the incorporation of legal, social, and ethical considerations into decision-making. The course teaches the importance of legal and ethical business issues and enables students to make a difference in their organizations by engaging in reasoned consideration of the normative aspects of the firm. Using the case method, the course provides an over­view of current topics, including the legal process, corporate governance, employee rights and responsibilities, intellectual property and technology, and the social responsibility of business to its various stakeholders.

MG 0504 Managing People for Competitive Advantage3 Credits

This course focuses on effectively managing people in organizations by emphasizing the critical links between strategy, leadership, organizational change, and human resource management. Topics include the strategic importance of people, leading organizational change, corporate social responsibility, implementing successful mergers and acquisitions, and fundamentals of human resource practices. Discussions interweave management theory with real-world practice. Class sessions are a combination of case discussions, experiential exercises, and lectures.

MG 0505 Human Resource Strategies: An Analytics Approach3 Credits

Human Resource Strategy is the linkage between human resource management (HRM) and firm strategy, contributing to competitive advantage of the firm. Human capital, which is knowledge, skills and abilities (KSA) of people, is one of the strategic assets of the firm. HRM entails recruitment and selection, training and development, total compensation and rewards, performance management, employee relations (such as diversity management, work life balance, legal and ethical compliance, safety issues) and other people related practices. In this course students will analyze how these practices can be aligned with the strategy of the firm and lead to greater firm performance. The students will take an analytics approach to generate for effectively managing employees so that business goals can be reached quickly and efficiently. the challenge of human resources analytics is to identify what data should be captured and how to use the data to model and predict capabilities so the organization gets an optimal return on investment (ROI) on its human capital.

MG 0506 Organizational Culture3 Credits

This course starts from the premise that organizations are more than the sum of their parts and best understood as complex, evolving cultures. . Indeed, organizations prosper or stumble on the meanings they produce. An organization's structure, control mechanisms, leadership, and identity are not, therefore, to be treated as brute facts of nature but as accomplishments of culture-bound human imaginations. Predicted on this 'constructivist' perspective, this course employs pressing questions about the efficacy of market-based culture (e.g., resource depletion) to improve students' skills in reconsidering corporate business purpose and social and environmental obligation.

MG 0507 Negotiations and Dispute Resolution3 Credits

Prerequisite: MG 0500.

This course uses the theories of negotiation and alter­native dispute resolution, along with extensive expe­riential exercises, to build individual negotiation skills and to help students manage disputes from a business perspective. The course emphasizes ways of manag­ing both internal and external disputes.

MG 0508 Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation: The Entrepreneurial Firm3 Credits

This course begins by presenting cutting-edge concepts and applications so that students understand the dynamics of innovation, the construction of a well-crafted innovation strategy, and the development of well-designed processes for implementing the innovation strategy. It then focuses on the building of an entrepreneurial organization as a critical core competency in the innovation process. Concurrent with this, it focuses on the development and support of the internal entrepreneur or Intrapreneur as part of the process of developing organizational core competencies that build competitive comparative advantages that, in turn, allow the firm to strategically and tactically compete in the global marketplace. Topics explored include technology brokering, lead users, disruptive technologies and the use of chaos and complexity theory in the strategic planning process.

MG 0510 Management Communication, Influence, and Power3 Credits

Prerequisite: MG 0500.

This course examines the critical factors involved in communication, influence, and power in organizations. It emphasizes that a business strategy, decision, or idea is effective only if it is communicated in a way that persuades an audience. The course is intended for managers who seek to become more effective com­municators, whether it is with one person, a group, or a large audience. Fundamentals of persuasion and influence tactics provide the context for considering such topics as critical listening skills, assessing one's emotional intelligence, analyzing communication net­works, gender differences in communication, and strat­egies for communicating during conflict. The course addresses how to formulate communication objectives and strategy; assess levels of credibility; power, audi­ence diversity, and corporate culture; analyze message structure; and choose appropriate communication media. This is an involved, hands-on class. In-class exercises, oral and written presentations, and case discussions provide vivid illustrations of the concepts.

MG 0512 The Law of Commercial Transactions: Advanced Studies in the Uniform Commerical Code3 Credits

This course offers an in-depth analysis of laws and legal principles relevant to commercial transactions. Several articles of the Uniform Commercial Code will be studied, including: Articles 2 and 2A (Sales, Warranties and Leases of Goods); Articles 3 and 3A (Negotiable Instruments - i.e., checks, drafts, promissory notes); Articles 4 and 4A (Bank Collections and Deposits); Article 5 (Letters of Credit); Article 7 (Warehouse Receipts) and Article 9 (Secured Transactions). Federal bankruptcy law (with particular attention to Chapters 7 and 11) will also be considered.

MG 0520 Diversity in the Workplace3 Credits

Prerequisite: MG 0500.

Students explore the value of diversity in organiza­tions. They develop an increased understanding of the ways in which differences in the workplace can enhance both personal development and organization­al effectiveness. To accomplish this, students explore why diversity has become a central strategic issue, their own diversity framework, the relationship between diversity and management effectiveness, and strate­gies for valuing diversity. The class addresses specific dimensions of diversity and the knowledge and skills students must develop to work effectively with people who are different.

MG 0525 Performance Management3 Credits

This course builds on the foundational evaluations and reward concepts covered in "Managing People for Competitive Advantage." Students explore in some depth the employee performance management, compensation, and reward systems in organizations. Topics may include 360 degree feedback programs, ESOPs, profit sharing, gain sharing, and the strategic use of employee benefits. The course focuses on how employee performance management, compensation, and reward systems can lead to a competitive advantage for firms.

MG 0530 Entrepreneurship3 Credits

This course covers entrepreneurship and small business management. The course focuses on the development of entrepreneurial start-up ventures from the point of view of the founding entrepreneur. The course explores characteristics and skills of successful entrepreneurs, the stages of growth of entrepreneurial businesses, the crises in start-up ventures, and issues confronting family and small business management. Students may create their own start-up business plan in conjunction with faculty as the primary course requirement.

MG 0531 Social Entrepreneurship3 Credits

This course is about understanding how entrepreneurial skills can be used to craft innovative responses to pressing social needs. These skills are opportunity recognition, assembling resources, launching a venture, scaling it and finally ensuring its sustainability. There will be an emphasis, throughout the course, on how exemplar for-profit enterprises have been able to successfully contribute to widespread economic well-being and social development while enjoying significant profitability. Students will appreciate that the pursuit of profit and poverty alleviation need not be mutually exclusive domains and the institutional requirements that are needed to ensure this outcome.

MG 0535 International Human Resources Management3 Credits

Prerequisite: MG 0500.

This course delves into the complexities of managing human resources in the global business arena. Business today is characterized by the relentless pace of globalization through the formation of international collaborations, mergers, joint ventures, and the opening of new markets. A major challenge posed by this landscape is the need to understand the similarities and differences in people management practices across cultures and countries. As firms enter global markets, hire foreign employees, or outsource work to foreign countries, human resources management practices such as recruitment, training, compensation, performance management, and employee relations become more complex. Legal and regulatory requirements of foreign countries, cultural differences, expatriate management, and workforce mobility become important considerations for global businesses. This course explores these complexities and analyzes in-depth the people-related issues in different countries.

MG 0540 Cross-Cultural Management3 Credits

This course develops a framework for distinguishing the various stages of cooperative relationships across national cultures, which have distinct characteristics and call for different modes of behavior. The stages of this framework include: identifying a cross-cultural win-win strategy; translating the strategy into viable action plans; executing the strategy and making cross-cultural collaboration happen; and assuring that emerging synergistic organizations become self-initiating entities. The course identifies and discusses in detail the necessary managerial skills for the support of each of these stages.

MG 0545 Law and Human Resources Management3 Credits

Prerequisite: MG 0503.

This course examines law and public policy issues relating to employee rights and obligations, including employment discrimination, OSHA, pension and benefit issues, minimum wage, and workers' compensation. The course provides a basic overview of the law and its relevance to human resource strategy and operations.

MG 0550 International Business Law and Regulation3 Credits

Prerequisite: MG 0503.

This course examines public and private international law and regulation, emphasizing issues relevant to doing business internationally.

MG 0555 Labor Relations3 Credits

Prerequisite: MG 0505.

The dual aim of this course is to acquaint students with the dynamics of the labor-management relationship and to make them better negotiators and managers of workplace conflict. Toward these ends, this course examines the processes of bargaining and dispute resolution, primarily in the context of the unionized environment. Case studies, law cases, and experiential exercises are used to explore issues such as negotiations strategy, mediation, and arbitration. Successful models of cooperative relations between management and labor are also covered.

MG 0560 Career Planning and Development3 Credits

Prerequisite: MG 0500.

This course provides students an opportunity to explore career planning and development issues from two perspectives, as a job-seeking candidate and as an employer engaged in the hiring and development process of employees. The course will provide theoretical background on a number of career development topics, including: career development over the life span, career transitions, work-family balance, and post-retirement issues. Cases on individuals negotiating career issues such as new roles associated with promotion, managing technical or entrepreneurial careers, aspects of derailment and family issues will be presented. The second part of the course will be devoted to experiential activities that are designed to enhance one's career planning skills. Students take a self-assessment survey and participate in workshops on resume creation, mock interviewing, and social media applications associated with the job search.

MG 0580 Contemporary Topics in Management and Human Resources1-3 Credits

This course examines recent practitioner and academic literature in various areas of management. Topics vary each semester. Guest speakers may be invited as appropriate.

MG 0584 Global Competitive Strategy3 Credits

This course considers the formulation of effective policy and accompanying strategy actions, and the management of such policies and actions. It examines the role of the general manager in this process and presents the diversified issues and problems the management of a business firm may be required to consider and solve in strategic planning. This course also examines the problems and tasks of strategy implementation and the general manager's function of achieving expected objectives and establishing new ones to assure the continuity of the business organization. Students are required to prepare a business plan as part of this course.

MG 0595 Contemporary Topics in Human Resources Management3 Credits

This course examines recent academic literature in various areas of Human Resources Management. Topics vary each semester to fit the interests of the seminar participants. Guest speakers may be invited as appropriate.

Marketing

MK 0400 Marketing Management3 Credits

This course examines analytical and managerial techniques that apply to marketing functions with an emphasis on the development of a conceptual framework necessary to plan, organize, direct, and control the product and strategies needed for promotion, distribution and pricing of a firm's products. The course also considers the relationship of marketing to other units within a firm.

MK 0500 Customer Value3 Credits

Prerequisite: MK 0400.

This course examines the concept of customer value with the goal of understanding how it can be used to achieve customer satisfaction, which in turn generates loyalty and, ultimately, a long-term customer-firm relationship. Topics include the nature of the costs and benefits associated with the notion of customer value, measuring and analyzing customer value and satisfaction, and understanding the associated concepts of customer loyalty and customer relationship management. The class consists of a mix of lectures, case analyses, in-depth qualitative research projects, and opportunities for practical applications, such as a marketing simulation.

MK 0510 Customer Behavior3 Credits

This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the behavior of consumers in the marketplace, covering concepts from the fields of economics, psychology, social psychology, sociology, and psychoanalysis. Topics include motivation, perception, attitudes, consumer search, and post-transactional behavior.

MK 0520 Marketing Research3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the risks associated with marketing decisions and emphasizes developing skills for conducting basic market research. Topics include problem formulation, research design, data collection instruments, sampling and field operations, validity, data analysis, and presentation of results.

MK 0535 Building Brand Equity3 Credits

This course focuses on the theory and conceptual tools used to develop and implement product and service branding strategies, as means for insuring brand awareness, acceptance, and success, or "equity," in the marketplace. The course highlights the importance and impact of the brand in the marketplace; identifies various decisions involved in creating successful brands; provides an overview of different means for measuring brand effectiveness; and explores the existence of customer-brand relationships. The course incorporates three general modules: Module 1: Identifying/Developing Brand Equity, Module 2: Measuring Brand Equity, and Module 3: Managing Brand Equity.

MK 0540 Advertising Management3 Credits

This course provides a comprehensive overview of advertising and promotional processes, and develops strategies facilitating managerial decisions in the areas of advertising, public relations, sales promotion, and direct marketing. This course analyzes the importance and influence of advertising in the changing marketplace; provides students with an integrated approach for analyzing marketing communication opportunities; develops the capability for designing, implementing, and evaluating advertising campaigns; and promotes an understanding of the different methods of measuring advertising effectiveness.

MK 0550 Global Marketing3 Credits

This course investigates the role of marketing and marketing management in different environments. It focuses on the distinction between the various marketing activities in a domestic setting versus the impact of the cultural, political, and geographic issues faced in different countries and regions of the world.

MK 0560 Business-to-Business Marketing in the Internet Economy3 Credits

This course develops an applied understanding of the principles of business-to-business marketing, which focuses on organizational customers who buy for production purposes rather than individuals who buy for personal consumption. The techno-economic purchase motivations of organizational customers require appropriate adaptation of product, promotion, distribution, and pricing strategies. The course examines the strategic and operational implications of organizational buyer behavior and other special characteristics of business-to-business products and services that influence their marketing strategy. The course incorporates the vital and specific role of the Internet as an integral and indispensable instrument of every function and activity in business-to-business marketing operations in all subjects.

MK 0570 Digital Marketing3 Credits

The move to an Internet-based society is among the changes expected to have a significant impact on the way that business is, and will be, conducted. This course pays particular attention to the impact of Internet technology on marketing strategy and practices, and discusses Internet technology and e-business in the context of established marketing concepts such as promotion, distribution/logistics, pricing, retailing, marketing research, customer behavior, and other product/service decisions from a practical and academic perspective. Students develop an in-depth understanding of the marketing implications of this promising business management development.

MK 0580 Multivariate Data Analysis for Decision Making3 Credits

Prerequisite: MK 0520.

With unprecedented growth in data availability, companies are increasingly focusing on data driven decision making in marketing. As most of this data is multivariate, an understanding of statistical techniques used to analyze it gains paramount importance. The objective of this course is to develop skills with a range of procedures for multivariate data analysis involving dimension reduction, pattern recognition, classification, and prediction. Students will engage in experiential exercises that require utilizing statistical software to organize and analyze data, interpreting the results, and presenting actionable conclusions for decision making.

MK 0585 Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Marketing3 Credits

This course examines recent practitioner and academic literature in various areas of marketing, incorporating guest speakers as appropriate. Topics vary each semester to fit the interests of the seminar participants.

MK 0590 Experimental Research in Marketing3 Credits

Prerequisites: MK 0400, MK 0520.

Experiments are widely used in marketing research to investigate cause and effect relationships, such as the impact of a price change on sales, or the impact of a new promotional campaign on brand awareness, or the impact of a change in the ingredients of a product on brand acceptance. This course is intended to acquaint the student with the basic topics of experimental design and analysis. It is intended to provide an understanding of the components of an experiment, the various types of experimental designs, the analysis of experimental results and when experiments are indicated as a research option.

Operations Management

OM 0400 Principles of Business Analytics3 Credits

This course introduces basic concepts and tools relevant to operations and supply chain management, including process mapping, quality management, decision analysis, capacity planning, supply chain management, project management, and operations strategy. Case studies are used to link the concepts and models to real-world business applications.

OM 0500 Business Model Optimization3 Credits

Prerequisite: OM 0400.

This course introduces basic skills necessary for business analytics such as data analysis using basic statistics, data visualization and summarization, descriptive and inferential statistics, spreadsheet modeling for prediction, linear regression, risk analysis using Monte-Carlo simulation, linear and nonlinear optimization, and decision analysis. Microsoft Excel is used as the platform for conducting analyses and performing statistical calculations.

OM 0525 Process Improvement and Quality Management3 Credits

Prerequisites: OM 0400, QA 0400.

This course addresses topics and methods related to business process improvement and lean six-sigma quality management so that firms are able to improve their performance along key dimensions such as cost, quality, speed, and flexibility. Through the use of case studies, students learn to approach problems using methods that have proven effective for a variety of organizations. Topics include: financial justification of operational improvements, change management, six-sigma process improvement methods and tools, business process reengineering, and lean production concepts applied in both manufacturing and service organizations. This course will also reinforce skills involved in working in teams and communicating recommendations effectively.

OM 0535 Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management3 Credits

This course emphasizes global logistics as the management of time and place. It takes an integrated cross-functional management approach using strategic infrastructure and resource management to efficiently create customer value. Specifically, it examines the time-related global positioning of resources and the strategic management of the total supply-chain. Topics include procurement, manufacturing, distribution, and waste disposal, and discussion of associated transport, storage, and information technologies.

Quantitative Analysis

QA 0400 Applied Business Statistics3 Credits

Using spreadsheet software, this hands-on course teaches a variety of quantitative methods for analyzing data to help make decisions. Topics include: data presentation and communication, probability distributions, sampling, hypothesis testing and regression, and time series analysis. This course uses numerous case studies and examples from finance, marketing, operations, accounting, and other areas of business to illustrate the realistic use of statistical methods.

QA 0500 Business Forecasting and Predictive Analytics3 Credits

Prerequisite: QA 0400.

This course introduces analytical techniques used for decision-making under uncertainty. Topics include time series and other forecasting techniques, such as Monte Carlo simulation, to assess the risk associated with managerial decisions. Specifically, we will cover data collection methods, time dependent models and analysis, advanced solver, time series techniques, exponential smoothing, moving averages, and Box-Jenkins (ARIMA) models. Application examples include financial models - stock prices, risk management - bond ratings, behavior models - customer attrition, customer likes/dislikes, buying patterns - propensity to buy, politics - identify swing voters, and sales.

Taxation

TX 0500 Tax Research3 Credits

This course introduces students to tax research source materials and provides students with the opportunity to conduct tax research. After the course, students should be able to identify tax issues inherent in various fact scenarios, locate and evaluate various sources of tax law, and effectively communicate conclusions and recommendations based on their research. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0501 Tax Accounting3 Credits

This course introduces students to federal tax accounting and contrasts its effects with those of financial accounting. After the course, students should be able to identify accounting transactions and methods that have differing tax and financial statement treatments, and to understand and plan for the consequences of those differences. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0502 Tax of Property Transactions3 Credits

This course introduces students to the income tax laws impacting real property transactions. After the course, students should be able to identify tax issues stemming from various types of real property transactions and activities, as well as plan for the consequences of, and make recommendations for alternatives to, contemplated property transactions. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0510 Entity Taxation3 Credits

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts, rules, and tax planning applications of the federal income taxation for different business entities including corporations, partnerships and trusts, in addition to estate and gift taxes. After the course, students should be able to identify the tax planning implications of different income taxation concepts and rules pertaining to business entity transactions including formation, operations, distributions, liquidation, and other transactions between the entity and its owners or beneficiaries. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0512 Corporate Tax II3 Credits

Prerequisite: TX 0510.

This course introduces students to advanced concepts of the federal income taxation of corporations, partnerships, trusts and estates. An examination of some advanced topics in estate and gift taxation will also be undertaken. The course will focus on examining case situations and planning opportunities available. After the course, students should be able to identify tax issues in these advanced areas and suggest alternative plans for consideration and implementation. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0520 Estate and Gift Taxation3 Credits

This course introduces students to the concepts of, as well as the statutory rules surrounding, federal estate and gift taxation. After the course, students should be able to identify tax issues stemming from lifetime and at-death transfers of various types of property and property rights to various classes of beneficiaries or donees, as well as to plan for the consequences of, and make recommendations for alternative structuring of intended wealth transfers. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0522 Income Taxation of Trusts and Estates3 Credits

This course introduces students to the concepts of, as well as the statutory rules surrounding, the federal income taxation of trusts and estates. After the course, students should be able to identify income tax issues arising during administration, which affect the various parties to the estate or trust, as well as to plan for the consequences of, and make recommendations for alternative structuring of intended transactions. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0530 Partnership Taxation3 Credits

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of the federal income taxation of partnerships and partner-partnership transactions. After the course, students should be able to identify tax issues stemming from various partnership transactions and activities, including those between the partnership and the partners, as well as plan for the consequences of, and make recommendations for alternative structuring of, intended transactions and activities. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0540 State and Local Taxation3 Credits

This course helps students develop a conceptual understanding of the constitutional limits on a state's power to impose taxes, the determination of state-specific taxable income, the sales and use tax system, and various other state taxes. After the course, students should be able to identify the tax issues associated with the conduct of business in multiple states, as well as plan for the consequences of, and make recommendations for alternative structuring of, intended multi-state transactions and activities. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0542 International Taxation3 Credits

This course helps students develop a conceptual understanding of the federal income tax provisions applicable to non-resident aliens and foreign corporations. After the course, students should be able to identify the tax issues associated with the generation of U.S. taxable income by foreign individuals and corporations, as well as plan for the consequences of, and make recommendations for alternative structuring of, intended U.S. transactions and activities by these particular taxpayers. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0548 Tax Practice and Procedure3 Credits

This course familiarizes students with the rules of practice before the Internal Revenue Service, as well as the procedures available for the resolution of income tax matters of disagreement. After the course, students should be able to identify the appropriate procedures applicable to specific transactions, elections and filings, as well as the appropriate and alternative means by which the resolution of disagreements between taxpayers and the IRS can be achieved. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0550 Tax Planning3 Credits

This course develops a framework for understanding how taxes affect business decisions, and provides students with the tools to identify, understand, and evaluate tax planning opportunities in various decision contexts, such as investments, compensation, organizational form choice, and multinational endeavors. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0585 Contemporary Topics in Taxation3 Credits

This course presents recent practitioner and academic literature in various areas of taxation, including guest speakers where appropriate. Topics change semester to semester, depending upon faculty and student interests. Open only to students enrolled in MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or SYC Taxation programs, or by permission from the Department Chair or his or her designee.

TX 0591 Practicum in Taxation3 Credits

This course builds on the in-class lessons covered during the student's graduate studies by providing the student with the opportunity to apply his/her academic knowledge to a professional taxation context. As such, it is an experiential learning activity. Successful completion of the practicum will entitle students to three credits that count as a graduate-level taxation elective. Open only to students enrolled in the MS Accounting, MBA Taxation, or Taxation Graduate Certificate program. Enrollment by permission of the department chair or his/her designee. This course may not be repeated for credit.

TX 0598 Independent Study3 Credits

This course provides students with an opportunity to develop research skills while exploring a specific contemporary taxation issue with a full-time faculty specializing in the area of the discipline. Students are expected to complete a significant research paper as the primary requirement of this course. Enrollment by department chair permission only.