Academic Policies and General Regulations

Philosophy of Education

Fairfield University has, as its primary objective, the development of the creative intellectual potential of its students within a context of religious commitment.

Fairfield believes in the particular excellence of a liberal education. In an effort to achieve this objective, it requires each student to take courses from five areas of knowledge: mathematics and the natural sciences, history and the social and behavioral sciences, philosophy and religious studies, English and the arts, and modern and classical languages. Thus assured of a basic, well-rounded education, students are free to pursue a major field of study in preparation for scholarly or professional pursuits.

To assist the student in the quest for truth, the University promotes dialogue between teacher and student, between student and student, between teacher and teacher. This dialogue takes place in an environment of absolute freedom of inquiry.

Normal Academic Progress

Academic Year

The academic year begins in early September and ends in late May, with recess periods at Christmas and in the spring. It is divided into two semesters, each extending over a period of about 15 weeks. The semester hour is the unit of instructional credit. The class day begins at 8:00am and is divided into class periods of 50, 75, or 150 minutes and laboratory periods of two, three, or four hours.

Admission Expectations

Undergraduate students admitted into the University on a full-time basis have the benefit of co-creating a premiere educational opportunity, one that attends to their educational, spiritual, vocational, and civic development across an intentional four-year course of study. We seek, of course, to expand students' awareness, during their time at Fairfield, of the many possibilities a Fairfield education makes available to them.

Undergraduate students admitted into the University on a full-time basis are expected to remain full-time until they graduate.

In the College of Arts and Sciences, the Dolan School of Business, and the School of Engineering, consultation with the appropriate dean is required for a full-time student to switch to part-time status. Rules and their financial implications for movement from full-time to part-time will be clear at the time of matriculation. Reasons to switch may include personal hardship, such as a documented medical condition that requires a reasonable accommodation, unexpected and substantial family responsibilities, the first semester of return from an academic or medical leave of absence, fifth year seniors, etc.

Unexpected emergency situations that arise during a term would be handled through the normal withdrawal process. Part-time status may be an alternative to a full educational leave of absence.

Full-Time Status

The normal course load for a matriculated student is five courses per semester, equivalent to 15 to 20 credit hours. To maintain full-time status, a matriculated student must be registered for a minimum of 12 credit hours each semester.

Credit Hours

Three-credit courses at Fairfield University meet for 150 minutes per week, equally divided over one, two, or three meetings. Four credit courses meet a minimum of 200 minutes per week in various configurations.

Classification System

Student classification is based on total credit hours earned.

Class Credit Hours Earned Year
First-year 0 through 29 1
Sophomore 30 through 59 2
Junior 60 through 89 3
Senior 90 through 120 4

Degree Requirements

At the time of graduation, a student must have earned a minimum of 120 credits and completed at least 38 three- or four-credit courses, depending on the course of study. However, no simple accumulation of credits is sufficient in itself to qualify for a degree from Fairfield University. Rather, students are expected to have completed with success all of the assigned courses that constitute the curriculum of their choice. The curriculum consists of courses that fall into the required categories of core curriculum, major, and electives. A second major, minor, and concentration are also an option. Students must have a minimum grade average of 2.0 (C) or better overall and in their major. Students must abide by the terms of the University's residency requirement, set forth below. In addition, students are expected to complete their undergraduate degrees within 10 years of beginning their studies.

Residency Requirement

To merit a Fairfield University degree, at least 60 credits must be taken at Fairfield. Furthermore, the final 30 credits must be earned at Fairfield University.

Registration Requirement

All matriculated full-time undergraduate students must register for classes by December 1 for the following spring semester, and by May 1 for the following fall semester. If a student is not registered by these dates, the University will presume him or her to be withdrawn at the end of the current semester. At that time, all residence hall and financial aid commitments will be terminated.

Graduation Information

Diplomas are awarded in January, May, and August. All students who have been awarded diplomas within the year are invited to participate in the May graduation ceremony.

Students who do not complete all of the requirements for their undergraduate degree may be granted permission by their Dean to participate in the Undergraduate Commencement ceremonies if they meet the following criteria:

  • End of spring term major GPA and overall GPA: Student must have a minimum overall grade point average of 2.0 and must meet the appropriate major GPA, which is 2.0 unless otherwise stated.1
  • Student must need no more than three classes to fulfill degree requirements. These courses must be taken at Fairfield in the summer immediately following Commencement.
  • Student must send a written request to their Dean's office with proof of course registration by April 15th prior to Commencement.
  • Student names will be announced at graduation, but they will not appear in the printed commencement materials.
1

Students whose GPA is contingent on end of term grades will be notified of the approval or denial of their request when grades are posted.

Attendance

Class Attendance

All students are expected to attend every regularly scheduled class session. The impact of attendance on grading is specified in the syllabus for each course. Unexcused absences may be reported to the appropriate academic dean.

Faculty members should have a policy for dealing with student absence on the syllabus for each course. If a student will miss a class due to an illness/injury, the professor should be notified according to the policy on the syllabus. If a student will miss an exam, quiz or in class presentation due to illness/injury or another type of emergency, the professor should be contacted beforehand. A faculty member may request that the student provide verification of the absence from a health care provider. It is within the purview of the faculty member to determine when or whether a student absence will be excused.

For further information regarding student absences, please see the Policies and Procedures section of the Student Handbook.

Released Time

A student participating in a University-sponsored event has the right to be excused without penalty or grade jeopardy from exams, student presentations, attendance, and other classroom events during that time, provided the student makes up the required work in the fashion mutually agreed upon by the professor and the student.

Students participating in such University-sponsored events will be allowed to make up any major exams, tests, or quizzes they miss in a course when they are involved in a scheduled event provided that participating students, or the faculty moderator, inform all their professors in writing at the beginning of the semester, or as soon thereafter as possible, once scheduling is confirmed.

University-sponsored events covered by this policy are defined as follows:

  • Athletics
    • all varsity sporting events, including post season tournaments
    • all club sporting events
  • Others
    • concerts, plays, or other group performances where the absence of a member would detract from the overall performance
  • Departmental Clubs are not included in this policy.

Grading System

Grades

The quality of student performance in coursework is graded according to the official marks of A, B, C, D, and F. These marks have the following meanings:

A Outstanding achievement
B Superior level of achievement
C Acceptable level of achievement with course material
D Minimal achievement, but passing
F Unacceptable level of achievement; course must be repeated to obtain credit

The plus (+) may be added to grades of B or C to indicate work performed at the top of that range.

The minus (-) may be added to grades A, B, or C to indicate work performed below that range.

A semester's grade will normally be determined according to the following procedure:

Each course has a syllabus that details the evaluative components of the course and their weighting in determining the final grade

The form of the final, end-of-semester comprehensive evaluation (written examination, take-home, oral exam, paper, etc.) must appear on the syllabus at the beginning of the semester. No form of the final evaluation is to be due prior to the date assigned by the Registrar for that course's final examination. Students are not required to take more than two exams in any final exam day.

In addition to the foregoing academic grades, which indicate the quality of student performance, the notations I (Incomplete) or W (Withdrawal) may appear on a student's grade report.

Grade Point Value

The official mark or final letter grade earned in a course is assigned grade points. The grade points per credit hour and numerical equivalency for letter grades are as follows:

Grade Grade Points Numerical Equivalent
A 4.00 93-100
A- 3.67 90-92
B+ 3.33 87-89
B 3.00 83-86
B- 2.67 80-82
C+ 2.33 77-79
C 2.00 73-76
C- 1.67 70-72
D 1.00 60-69
F 0.00 0-59

Each semester's course grades are computed into a weighted average. To determine a weighted grade point average, the number of credits per course is multiplied by the grade points earned per course. The total number of grade points for all courses is then divided by the number of credits attempted.

Incomplete

A grade of "I" is issued when, due to an emergency situation such as illness, a student arranges with the professor to complete some of the course requirements after the semester ends. All course work must be completed within 30 days after the beginning of the next regular semester. Any incomplete grades still outstanding after the 30-day extension will become Fs. This policy applies only to courses taken at Fairfield University. It does not apply to courses taken in Study Abroad programs. Please refer to the Study Abroad section for additional information.

Course Load

Fairfield University desires to see all undergraduate students make normal progress toward graduation. For full-time students, the normal rate of work is defined as five courses per semester, each bearing three or four credit hours. The minimum rate of work for full-time students is four courses (minimum 12 credit hours) per semester.

Withdrawal from Courses

Students who wish to withdraw from a course after the initial add/drop period may do so through the end of the tenth week of a traditional semester provided that (a) the student's academic dean, in consultation with the course instructor, finds withdrawal to be in the student's best interest (note that a student must maintain 12 credit hours for full-time status). After the tenth week in the semester, course withdrawal will only be granted in highly unusual circumstances, such as a documented health emergency. Withdrawal after the tenth week will not be permitted simply to prevent receipt of a grade that might not meet the student's satisfaction. Students who wish to withdraw from a winter/summer intersession course or ASAP course may do so by the mid-point of the course. Students who have violated the academic honor code may not be eligible for withdrawal. In all approved cases, the University Registrar will record a grade of a "W" (withdrawal) on the student's permanent record. To initiate a request to withdraw from a course, a student must complete a Course Withdrawal Form and meet with an authorized representative of their academic dean's office or the Academic and Career Development Center. A "W" may not be granted after final grades have been submitted except in very rare cases, during which an instructor must file a change of grade form.

Repeat Course Policy

When a student repeats a course that was failed, the new grade will be recorded. Grade point values will be averaged into the cumulative average, and the credits will count toward the degree. The original grade will remain on the transcript and be calculated into the cumulative average. When a student repeats a course for which the student has previously obtained a passing grade, the new course and grade will be recorded on the transcript with the notation, repeat course. The original grade and the repeated grade will be averaged into the GPA. The credit for the repeat course will not count toward the degree. The original grade will remain on the transcript.

Transfer Credit

When students begin their university studies at other institutions and subsequently transfer to Fairfield University, the University accepts transfer credit under the following conditions:

  • No courses with grades less than C will qualify for transfer.
  • Credit will be granted only for specific work completed at regionally accredited institutions whose quality and course content have been approved by the University.
  • Only credit hours, not grades, will transfer.
  • Credits earned more than 10 years previous to a credit transfer request may not be able to be accepted.

All transfer credit must be approved by an undergraduate student's academic dean or an authorized representative of the Academic and Career Development Center. Every transfer student is required to complete at least 60 credits of undergraduate study at Fairfield in order to receive a Fairfield University bachelor's degree.

Academic Alert System

The academic progress of undergraduate students, specifically first year students and NCAA athletes, is monitored through a comprehensive Academic Alert System administered through the Academic and Career Development Center in collaboration with the academic deans' offices. A month into the semester, faculty are encouraged to report Early Alerts for undergraduate students, defined as academic and/or behavioral concerns that present obstacles to student success.  At the midpoint of each semester, faculty report Midterm Estimates, defined as grades of C-, D, or F, for all first year students and for upper-level students as deemed appropriate.  The Academic Alert System remains open throughout the academic year and provides a seamless interface for reporting students of concern while also streamlining academic support processes and providing a holistic approach to supporting student development and engagement.  Although not part of a student's official academic record, academic alerts raised are designed to allow faculty advisors and professional staff to review a student's academic progress throughout the year. Each student who receives an academic alert receives comprehensive information and an opportunity to meet with an academic administrator. The goal is to connect students who may be having difficulty or who are academically at-risk to appropriate academic and student support resources.  Early intervention with students on the part of professors, faculty advisors, and campus personnel can improve students' persistence, engagement, and success.

Grade Reports

Grades are available to all students by accessing the student web portal (my.Fairfield) at the end of each semester.

Disruption of Academic Progress

Academic Probation

Academic records will be formally reviewed at the end of the fall, spring, and summer terms. Students who do not meet the stated requirements will be placed on Academic Probation. The purpose of academic probation is to alert the student and the institution to the problems associated with the student’s academic performance and to recommend or implement strategies for improvement. The continuation of poor academic performance will result in the dismissal of the student. Faculty advisors are notified of all advisees placed on academic probation.

A student placed on academic probation will remain on academic probation until the overall GPA is at or above the requirements specified below. A student will be removed from academic probation when the overall GPA is equal to or greater than the requisite GPA according to credits earned.

A student on academic probation is ineligible to participate in extracurricular or co-curricular activities. A student on academic probation may petition the Associate Academic Vice President for the right to participate in extra- or co-curricular activities. The appeal must contain a valid and compelling reason why restriction of extra- or co-curricular activities is inappropriate, and must demonstrate effectively that the activity will contribute an improvement in academic performance.

First semester, first-year students with a GPA below 1.90 will not be placed on academic probation for their second semester, but they will lose their right to participate in extracurricular or co-curricular activities.

  • Students with 29 or fewer credits earned by the end of the second semester, or the first year at Fairfield, will be placed on academic probation if the overall GPA is below 1.90.
  • Students with 30-59 credits earned will be placed on academic probation if the overall GPA is below 1.90.  
  • Students with 60 or more credits earned will be placed on academic probation if the overall GPA is below 2.00.

Academic Dismissal

Students meeting any of the following conditions will be dismissed from the University:

  • A student who, regardless of academic standing, has received the grade of F in three or more 3- or 4-credit courses during the preceding 12 month period inclusive of all grades earned.
  • A student with 29 or fewer credits earned, who regardless of incompletes, while on academic probation proceeds to earn a semester GPA below 1.90.
  • A student with 30-59 credits earned, who regardless of incompletes, while on academic probation, proceeds to earn a semester GPA below 1.90
  • A student with 60 or more credits earned, who regardless of incompletes, while on academic probation proceeds to earn a semester GPA below 2.00

Students are removed from registered courses based on the date of their dismissal letter. Students who have been dismissed from the University for reason of academic failure are expected to remain away for at least a full semester (fall or spring) before seeking readmission. Such individuals lose all entitlement to institutionally funded financial aid. Except in extraordinary circumstances, students who are academically dismissed a second time will not be considered for readmission.

READMISSION AFTER AN ACADEMIC DISMISSAL

Prior to formally requesting readmission after an academic dismissal, students should consult with their Academic Dean’s Office. Formal request for readmission should be made at least three weeks before the start of the semester in which the student seeks to resume enrollment.

Note: Students are expected to remain away for at least a full semester (fall or spring) before seeking readmission. Except in extraordinary circumstances, students who are academically dismissed a second time will not be considered for readmission.

  1. The student seeking readmission must write a letter stating the rationale for the request including why the student is ready to resume study. The letter should be sent in advance to Dean Heather Petraglia in the Academic and Career Development Center, located in the Kelley Center, or by email. The letter should include the student's name, ID, address, phone, current school and major, new school and major (if requesting a change), returning semester, choice of full- or part-time studies and intention to live on campus or commute.
  2. After formal review of the student's request, the Academic Dean's Office will recommend whether the student should or should not be readmitted. Recommendations for readmission are forwarded to the Academic and Career Development Center, where a final decision will be rendered.
  3. The Academic and Career Development Center will send an official letter of acceptance or denial to the student, inclusive of any contingencies as deemed appropriate by the Academic Dean’s Office. The student may not register for classes or be assigned University-housing until the official letter of readmission is reviewed and processed.
  4. Residency: Students who were academically dismissed from Fairfield University and are readmitted as full time students will need to specifically request on-campus housing, and that request is subject to the review and approval of the Office of the Dean of Students.

Additional questions or concerns can be directed to the Academic Dean's Office.

Voluntary Withdrawal from University

To apply for a voluntary withdrawal, a student must complete the following steps:

  1. To discuss voluntarily withdrawing (for non-medical reasons); contact the appropriate Academic Dean's Office. This meeting is necessary to facilitate the withdrawal process and to discuss any future plans to return to the University.
    • Academic and Career Development Center, Kelley Center, x2222  (undeclared students)
    • College of Arts and Sciences, CNS 100, x2227
    • Dolan School of Business, DSB 1125, x3230
    • Egan School of Nursing and Health Studies, NHS 401, x4150
    • School of Engineering, BNW 167, x4147
  2. The student must submit a written request for withdrawing from the University, including the reasons for the withdrawal. Voluntary withdrawals from the University are subject to the following conditions
    1. There are no pending student conduct issues.
    2. The student is not liable for academic withdrawal due to insufficient progress or excessive absence.
    3. The student has settled all financial obligations to the University.
    4. Voluntary withdrawals cannot be granted retroactively.

      Note: If a student wants to withdraw when classes during the traditional semesters are not in session, the student must still submit a letter to the Academic Dean's Office. Students scheduled to live in University housing should send a copy of that letter to the Office of the Dean of Students.
  3. After meeting with an administrator in your Academic Dean's office, all resident students must set up a meeting with an administrator in the Office of the Dean of Students to discuss non-academic-related issues (housing, financial aid, Stag Card, student account, etc.) pertaining to the student's withdrawal from the University.  Failure to set up this meeting will result in continuation of your financial obligation to the University. The Office of the Dean of Students is located in BCC 408, x4211.

READMISSION AFTER A VOLUNTARY WITHDRAWAL

Prior to formally requesting readmission after a voluntary withdrawal, students should consult with their Academic Dean’s Office and Office of the Dean of Students. Formal request for readmission should be made at least three weeks before the start of the semester in which the student seeks to resume enrollment.

  1. The student seeking readmission must write a letter stating the rationale for the request including why the student is ready and wants to resume study. The letter should be sent in advance to Dean Heather Petraglia in the Academic and Career Development Center, located in the Kelley Center, or by email. The letter should include the student's name, ID, address, phone, current school and major, new school and major (if requesting a change), returning semester, choice of full- or part-time studies and intention to live on campus or commute.
  2. After formal review of the student's request, the Academic Dean's Office and the Office of the Dean of Students will assess whether the student should or should not be readmitted. Recommendations for readmission are forwarded to the Academic and Career Development Center, where a final decision will be rendered.
  3. The Academic and Career Development Center will send an official letter of acceptance or denial to the student, inclusive of any contingencies as deemed appropriate by the Academic Dean’s Office and/or the Office of the Dean of Students. The student may not register for classes or be assigned University-housing until the official letter of readmission is reviewed and processed.

Residency: Students who voluntarily withdrew from Fairfield University and are readmitted as full time students are expected to live on campus and will be assigned a residential space on campus by the Office of Residence Life at the time their readmission request is approved.

Additional questions or concerns can be directed to the Academic Dean's Office or the Office of the Dean of Students.

Medical Withdrawal from the University

A medical withdrawal is an extraordinary remedy and is reserved for all full-time and part-time matriculated students, as well as non-matriculated students, who have been presented with circumstances of a physical or mental health condition preventing the student from remaining enrolled at the University. While each request for a withdrawal will be considered on its own merits, students should be aware that the following do not constitute circumstances which will support a request for a medical withdrawal:

  • failing to attend class
  • insufficient academic performance
  • financial difficulties
  • dissatisfaction with course materials or offerings
  • change of interest or major
  • inability to meet all curricular and extracurricular commitments

Medical withdrawals cannot be granted retroactively.

The following process applies to students who wish to withdraw from Fairfield University for medical reasons.

  1. To discuss withdrawing as a student for medical reasons, contact the Office of the Dean of Students (x4211, BCC 408), the Student Health Center (x2241, Dolan Hall), or Counseling and Psychological Services (x2146, Dolan Hall). Information from personal or private physicians or psychologist is subject to review by the University, which has final decision making authority on the withdrawal request.

  2. A request for a medical withdrawal (whether physical or mental health based) must include at a minimum:
    • An explanation of why the student is unable to perform the essential academic functions of a student.
    • Complete and timely documentation from a physician or other appropriate health care provider who is competent to provide an opinion as to the nature, severity, and duration of the illness, and has provided treatment for, and in relation to, the condition(s) which form the basis for the requested withdrawal. These documents should be sent to the Director of the Student Health Center or the Director of Counseling and Psychological Services.
    • Authorization from the requesting student to allow the director of the Student Health Center or the director of Counseling and Psychological Services to contact the attending medical or health care provider if, after review of the documentation provided, it is determined that more information is required.
  3. If the request is granted, a student must arrange for the return of their StagCard and establish a move-out time and return of keys (it student lives on-campus) with the University. The institutional refund policy applies.
  4. Students are expected to remain away for at least a full semester (fall or spring) after a medical withdrawal before seeking readmission, unless deemed otherwise by the director of the Student Health Center or Counseling and Psychological Services.

READMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY AFTER A MEDICAL WITHDRAWAL

Prior to requesting readmission after a medical withdrawal, all full-time and part-time matriculated students, as well as non-matriculated students, should consult with the Office of the Dean of Students. Requests for readmission are strongly encouraged to be submitted by August 1 for fall semester, December 15 for spring semester, and April 15 for summer term.

  1. To seek readmission following a medical withdrawal, the student must submit a letter stating the rationale. A copy of the letter must be sent to Dean Heather Petraglia in the Academic and Career Development Center, located in the Kelley Center (or by email), and to the Office of the Dean of Students via email. The letter should include the student's name, ID, address, phone, current school and major, new school and major (if requesting a change), returning semester, choice of full- or part-time studies and intention to live on campus or commute.

  2. Students must submit a completed Post-Medical Withdrawal Readmission form to the Student Health Center (when medical situation is physical in nature) or Counseling and Psychological Services (when medical situation is psychological in nature). The requesting student may be asked to provide authorization allowing the director of the Student Health Center or the director of Counseling and Psychological Services to contact the student’s medical or health care provider if, after review of the documentation provided, it is determined that more information is required.

  3. The Office of the Dean of Students will ask the Student Health Center or Counseling and Psychological Services for their evaluation of the request. Upon receipt of that information, the Office of the Dean of Students will contact the student to arrange an appointment in-person, if at all possible, or over the phone, if necessary, to review the request.

  4. After formal review of the student's request for readmission, the Office of the Dean of Students and the academic Dean’s office will assess whether the student should be readmitted or not. Recommendations for readmission are forwarded to the Academic and Career Development Center, where a final decision will be rendered.

  5. The Academic and Career Development Center will send a notification regarding the student’s request for readmission. If readmission is granted, it may include directives as deemed appropriate by the student’s academic Dean’s office and/or the Office of the Dean of Students. The student may not register for classes or be assigned University housing until the official letter of readmission is issued.

QUICK OVERVIEW OF PROCESS

  1. Student submits request for readmission to the Dean of Academic and Career Development and Dean of Students.
  2. Dean of Academic and Career Development and Dean of Students confirm receipt of request; instruct student to submit requisite information to Student Health Center or Counseling and Psychological Services.
  3. Student Health Center or Counseling and Psychological Services determines whether or not to endorse the student’s request and provides recommended parameters or directives, if necessary; determination and recommendation sent to the Dean of Students.
  4. Dean of Students and student’s Academic Dean’s office provide readmission recommendation and any accompanying parameters or directives to the Academic and Career Development Center.
  5. Academic and Career Development Center sends student decision letter.
  6. If granted readmission, student contacts academic advisor or academic Dean’s office to register for courses.
  7. If on-campus housing is requested and approved, student contacts Office of Residence Life to make arrangements.

Educational Leave of Absence

Matriculated students may apply for an educational leave of absence for a fall or spring semester or for a full academic year in order to study abroad or for the Washington, DC, semester. Educational leaves are granted by the associate/assistant dean of the student's school or college. To be eligible for an educational leave of absence, a Fairfield University student must have an overall GPA of 2.80 or better at the time of application. In addition, the student must have a record of good academic and social standing for the semester immediately preceding application. Students who wish to be granted educational leave of absence must complete all official paperwork with the study abroad coordinator by Feb. 1 for the following year.

All students granted educational leaves by Fairfield University will be charged a fee for maintenance of their matriculation at Fairfield. Furthermore, students who study elsewhere in non-affiliated programs lose their entitlement for institutional financial aid for the period of the leave.

Credits from Other Institutions

Matriculated students may be permitted to take courses for degree credit at another institution with pre-approval by the dean of the student's school. Only credits (not grades) are transferable. For each approved course taken at another institution, credits will be accepted in transfer only if the student has earned a grade of C or better.  Official transcripts should be forwarded to the student’s academic dean upon completion of pre-approved coursework at other institutions.

Students are cautioned that deans will grant permission to take courses elsewhere only when the student can demonstrate compelling reasons to do so or to take advantage of a special curriculum offered at another U.S. institution. Students are expected to complete graduation requirements including Major and Core courses at Fairfield University.  Students participating in a study abroad program while on approved Educational Leave of Absence should consult with the Study Abroad Office prior to departure to obtain course pre-approval. 

In all cases, the following restrictions apply:

  • Of the 120 or more credits required for the bachelor's degree, a minimum of 60 of those credits must be earned at Fairfield University.
  • Students are permitted to take no more than two courses at another regionally-accredited U.S. institution during a summer or winter intercession and no more than 5 courses (post-matriculation) will be applied toward degree completion. 
  • The last 30 credits earned toward a student's degree must be completed at Fairfield University or through a program that issues Fairfield University course credit.

Advanced Placement

While in high school, some students pursue one or more college-level Advanced Placement course. Fairfield University will award three or four hours of credit toward graduation for each AP course taken by a student, provided that the student has taken an Advanced Placement Test prepared by the CEEB program and obtained a test score of four or five. It is the discretion of college/school officials to determine if such AP credits can be used to exempt students from specific University courses or requirements. Normally, AP credit will not exempt a student from requirements in his/her major. No student will be awarded more than a total of 15 AP credits by Fairfield University.

Below is a partial list of AP tests submitted by students for advanced placement, along with their Fairfield University equivalent.

AP Test Fairfield Course Equivalent Credits
Art History AH 0010 Origins and Transformations in Western Art 3
Biology BI 0170 General Biology I 4
Chemistry CH 0111 General Chemistry I 4
Microeconomics EC 0011 Introduction to Microeconomics 3
Macroeconomics EC 0012 Introduction to Macroeconomics 3
English Composition EN 0011 Texts and Contexts I 3
English Literature/Composition EN 0011 Texts and Contexts I 3
Environmental Science BI 0076 Environmental Science 3
European History HI 0010 Origins of the Modern World 3
U.S. History HI 200-level Course 3
World History HI 200-level Course 3
Calculus AB MA 0171 Calculus I 4
Calculus BC MA 0171 & MA 0172 Calculus I & II 8
Computer Science Principles CS 0101 Introduction to Computing 3
Computer Science A CS 0131 Fundamentals of Programming 3
French Language FR 0210 Intermediate French I 3
German Language GM 0210 Intermediate German I 3
Italian Language IT 0210 Intermediate Italian I 3
Spanish Language SP 0210 Intermediate Spanish I 3
Physics I or II PS 0077 The Science and Technology of War and Peace: The Way Things Work 3
Physics C PS 0115 General Physics I 4
Psychology PY 0101 General Psychology 3
Statistics MA 0217 Accelerated Statistics 3
U.S. Government and Politics PO 0011 Introduction to American Politics 3
Comparative Gov't and Politics PO 0012 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3
Studio Art: 2D Design SA 0016 Introduction to 2-D Design 3
Studio Art: 3D Design SA 0011 Introduction to Sculpture 3
Studio Art: Drawing SA 0012 Introduction to Drawing 3

Higher Level International Baccalaureate Courses

Fairfield University recognizes the advanced nature of Higher Level International Baccalaureate courses. Generally, three credits will be awarded toward a Fairfield degree for a Higher Level IB course taken by a student, provided a grade of six or seven is achieved. Final determination concerning the amount of credit and whether or not it can be used to exempt students from specific University courses or requirements rests with the dean in consultation with the academic department. Normally, Higher Level IB credit will not exempt a student from requirements in his/her major. Students can earn a maximum combined total of 15 credits for Higher Level IB and Advanced Placement courses.

College Courses Completed While in High School

For students who pursue college courses while in high school, upon receipt of an official college transcript and related documentation, the course work will be evaluated by the appropriate dean/director in consultation with the appropriate curriculum area, provided the following criteria are met:

  • The course(s) must have been completed in a college environment and must have been taught by a college professor
  • The course(s)/credits were not used to satisfy high school graduation requirements
  • A final grade of "C" or better was earned

That dean/director will determine the appropriateness of the transfer credit for the student's program and decide whether it has met Fairfield's curriculum standards. A maximum of 15 credits of approved coursework will be awarded transfer credit. The grades will not be transferred.

Transcripts

Transcript requests may be made by following the instructions available on the Registrar's website. There is a $5 fee for each copy. Online requests are subject to an additional processing fee. In accordance with the general practices of colleges and universities, official transcripts with the University seal are sent directly by the University. Requests should be made at least one week in advance of the date needed. Requests are not processed during examination and registration periods.

Academic Freedom and Responsibility

The statement on academic freedom, as formulated in the 1940 Statement of Principles endorsed by the AAUP (American Association of University Professors) and incorporating the 1970 interpretive comments, is the policy of Fairfield University. Academic freedom and responsibility are here defined as the liberty and obligation to study, to investigate, to present and interpret, and to discuss facts and ideas concerning all branches and fields of learning. Academic freedom is limited only by generally accepted standards of responsible scholarship and by respect for the Catholic commitment of the institution as expressed in its mission statement, which provides that Fairfield University "welcomes those of all beliefs and traditions who share its concerns for scholarship, justice, truth, and freedom, and it values the diversity which their membership brings to the university community."

Freedom of Expression

As an academic institution, Fairfield University exists for the transmission of knowledge, pursuit of truth, development of students, and the general well-being of society. Free inquiry and free expression are indispensable to the attainment of these goals. Fairfield University recognizes that academic freedom, freedom of expression, and responsibility are required to realize the essential purposes of the University. Academic freedom and responsibility (distinguished from freedom of expression) are herein defined as the liberty and obligation to study, to investigate, to present, interpret, and discuss facts and ideas concerning all branches and fields of inquiry.

Student Rights

As constituents of the academic community, students should be free, individually and collectively, to express their views on issues of institutional policy and on matters of general interest to the student body.

Fairfield University students are both citizens and members of the academic community. As citizens of a private institution, Fairfield's students enjoy the same freedom of speech, peaceful assembly, and right of petition that students at other private institutions enjoy as accorded by law, and as members of the academic community, they are subject to the obligations which accrue to them by virtue of this membership. Faculty members and administration officials should ensure that institutional powers are not employed to deprive students of their rights as accorded to them by law and University policy. At the same time, the institution has an obligation to clarify those standards which it considers essential to its educational mission and its community life. These expectations and regulations should represent a reasonable regulation of student conduct.

As members of the academic community, students should be encouraged to develop the capacity for critical judgment and to engage in a sustained and independent search for truth. They do this within the requirements of the curriculum and the courses in which they are enrolled.

The professor in the classroom and in conference should encourage free discussion, inquiry, and expression. Student performance should be evaluated solely on an academic basis, not on opinions or conduct in matters unrelated to academic standards. This means that students are free to take reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of any course of study for which they are enrolled. Students in professional programs are expected to understand and uphold the standards required in their profession.

Students bring to the campus a variety of interests previously acquired and develop many new interests as members of the academic community. They should be free to organize and join associations to promote their common interests. Students and student organizations should be free to examine and discuss all questions of interest to them and to express opinions publicly and privately. Students should be allowed to invite and to hear any person of their own choosing. Those procedures required by an institution before a guest speaker is invited to appear on campus should be designed only to ensure that there is orderly scheduling of facilities and adequate preparation for the event, and that the occasion is conducted in a manner appropriate to an academic community. Guest speakers are subject to all applicable laws, and to the University policies on harassment and discrimination. Students' freedom of expression extends to their ability to express their opinions in writing or through electronic means, and to distribute and post materials expressing their opinions. Any restrictions should be designed only to ensure the orderly use of space and facilities, to provide reasonable restrictions on commercial messages, to comply with applicable fire, health or safety codes, to comply with the University's Non-Discrimination and Harassment Policy, or to comply with state or federal law. Students should always be free to support causes by orderly means which do not disrupt operations of the institution. At the same time, it should be made clear to the academic and larger community that in their public expressions or demonstrations, students or student organizations speak only for themselves and not the institution.

Student Responsibilities

Freedom of expression enjoyed by students is not without limitations. The rights set forth herein must be balanced against and considered in the context of the following responsibilities:

  • Students have the obligation to refrain from interfering with the freedom of expression of others.
  • Students have the responsibility to respect the rights and beliefs of others, including the values and traditions of Fairfield University as a Jesuit, Catholic institution.
  • Students have the responsibility to support learning, and when learning, to engage others in a respectful dialogue, to never threaten the safety or security of others, and to comply with all University policies prohibiting harassment, hate crimes, and discrimination.

All policies in this catalog and the actions taken under them must support Fairfield University's Mission Statement and the Statement on Academic Freedom.

Honor Code

Fairfield University's primary purpose is the pursuit of academic excellence. This is possible only in an atmosphere where discovery and communication of knowledge are marked by scrupulous, unqualified honesty. Therefore, it is expected that all students taking classes at the University adhere to the following Honor Code:

"I understand that any violation of academic integrity wounds the entire community and undermines the trust upon which the discovery and communication of knowledge depends. Therefore, as a member of the Fairfield University community, I hereby pledge to uphold and maintain these standards of academic honesty and integrity."

Academic Honesty

All members of the Fairfield University community share responsibility for establishing and maintaining appropriate standards of academic honesty and integrity. As such, faculty members have an obligation to set high standards of honesty and integrity through personal example and the learning communities they create. Such integrity is fundamental to, and an inherent part of, a Jesuit education, in which teaching and learning are based on mutual respect. It is further expected that students will follow these standards and encourage others to do so.

Students are sometimes unsure of what constitutes academic dishonesty. In all academic work, students are expected to submit materials that are their own and are to include attribution for any ideas or language that are not their own. Examples of dishonest conduct include, but are not limited to:

  • Falsification of academic records or grades, including but not limited to any act of falsifying information on an official academic document, grade report, class registration document or transcript.
  • Cheating, such as copying examination answers from materials such as crib notes or another student's paper.
  • Collusion, such as working with another person or persons when independent work is prescribed.
  • Inappropriate use of notes.
  • Falsification or fabrication of an assigned project, data, results, or sources.
  • Giving, receiving, offering, or soliciting information in examinations.
  • Using previously prepared materials in examinations, tests, or quizzes.
  • Destruction or alteration of another student's work.
  • Submitting the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without the prior written permission of each instructor.
  • Appropriating information, ideas, or the language of other people or writers and submitting it as one's own to satisfy the requirements of a course - commonly known as plagiarism. Plagiarism constitutes theft and deceit. Assignments (compositions, term papers, computer programs, etc.) acquired either in part or in whole from commercial sources, publications, students, or other sources and submitted as one's own original work will be considered plagiarism.
  • Unauthorized recording, sale, or use of lectures and other instructional materials.

In the event of such dishonesty, professors are to award a grade of zero for the project, paper, or examination in question, and may record an F for the course itself. When appropriate, expulsion may be recommended. A notation of the event is made in the student's file in the academic dean's office. The student will receive a copy.

Student Academic Grievance Procedure

Purpose

Procedures for review of academic grievances protect the rights of students, faculty, and the University by providing mechanisms for equitable problem solving.

Types of Grievances

A grievance is defined as a complaint of unfair treatment for which a specific remedy is sought. This procedure is concerned solely with academic grievances. It excludes circumstances that may give rise to a complaint for which explicit redress is neither called for nor sought, or for those for which other structures within the university serve as an agency for resolution.

Academic grievances relate to procedural appeals, academic dishonesty appeals, or quality of work appeals.

Procedural appeals are defined as those seeking a remedy in which no issue of the quality of a student's work is involved. For example, a student might contend that the professor failed to follow previously announced mechanisms of evaluation.

Academic dishonesty appeals are defined as those seeking a remedy because of a dispute over whether plagiarism, cheating, or other acts of academic dishonesty occurred. Remedies would include but not be limited to removal of a file letter, change of grade, or submitting new or revised work.

Quality of work appeals are defined as those seeking a remedy, following the completion of a course, because the evaluation of the quality of a student's coursework is alleged to be prejudiced or capricious.

Time Limits

The procedure herein defined must be initiated by the end of the subsequent fall or spring semester after the event that is the subject of the grievance. If the grievance moves forward, all subsequent steps of the informal process must be completed and the formal process must be initiated before the end of the second semester subsequent to the event that is the subject of the grievance.

Informal Procedures

  1. The student attempts to resolve any academic grievance with the faculty member. If, following this initial attempt at resolution, the student remains convinced that a grievance exists, she or he advances to step two.
  2. The student consults with the chair or program director, bringing written documentation of the process to this point. If the student continues to assert that a grievance exists after attempted reconciliation, she or he advances to step three.
  3. The student presents the grievance to the dean of the school in which the course was offered, bringing to this meeting documentation of steps one and two. After conversation with the instructor of record and the department chair/program director, the dean will inform the student whether or not the grade shall be changed by the instructor of record. If the student is dissatisfied with the outcome, the dean will inform the student of the right to initiate formal review procedures.

Formal Procedures

  1. If the student still believes that the grievance remains unresolved following the informal procedures above, she or he initiates the formal review procedure by making a written request for a formal hearing through the dean to the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs (PSVPAA). Such a request should define the grievance and be accompanied by documentation of completion of the informal process. It should also be accompanied by the dean's opinion of the grievance.
  2. The PSVPAA determines whether the grievance merits further attention. If not, the student is so informed. If, however, the grievance does merit further attention, the PSVPAA determines whether it is a procedural appeal, an academic dishonesty appeal, or a quality of work appeal.

    For procedural appeals and academic dishonesty appeals, the PSVPAA will convene a Grievance Committee according to the process described below, providing the committee with the written documentation resulting from the previous steps in the appeal process.

    For quality of work appeals, the PSVPAA will request that the chair of the department through which the course is taught, or if the chair is the subject of the grievance a senior member of the department, assemble an ad hoc committee of three department/program members to review the appeal, providing the committee with the written documentation resulting from the previous steps in the appeal process.
  3. For procedural appeals and academic dishonesty appeals, the Grievance Committee takes whatever steps are deemed appropriate to render a recom­mendation for resolving the grievance. The committee adheres to due process procedures analogous to those in the Faculty Handbook.

    For quality of work appeals, the department committee shall make itself available to meet and discuss the appeal with the student, and shall discuss the appeal with the instructor of record for the course. If the final consensus of the department committee is that the academic evaluation that led to the course grade was neither prejudiced nor capricious, the appeals process ends here.
  4. For procedural appeals and academic dishonesty appeals, the recommendation from the Grievance Com­mittee is forwarded to the PSVPAA in written form, accompanied, if necessary, by any sup­porting data that formed the basis of the recommendation. Should the Grievance Committee conclude that a change of grade is warranted, the two faculty members on the Grievance Committee will recommend an appropriate grade. In case of disagreement between the two faculty members, the dean chairing the Grievance Committee will decide which of the two recommended grades to accept. The recommended grade change shall be included in the report.

    For quality of work appeals, if the final consensus of the department committee is that the academic evaluation that led to the course grade was prejudiced or capricious, the department committee will recommend an alternative course grade. If the instructor of record agrees to change the grade to that recommended by the committee, the appeals process ends here. If the instructor of record declines to change the grade, the department committee shall prepare a written report, including the department committee’s recommended grade. The report will be forwarded to the PSVPAA and the instructor of record, who may send the PSVPAA a written response to the report. 
  5. For procedural appeals and academic dishonesty appeals, the PSVPAA renders a final and binding judgment, notifying all involved parties. If such an appeal involves a dispute over a course grade given by a faculty member, the PSVPAA is the only uni­versity official empowered to change that grade, and then only to the grade recommended by the Grievance Committee.

    For quality of work appeals, if the PSVPAA agrees with the department committee that the academic evaluation that led to the course grade was prejudiced or capricious, she or he is authorized to change the course grade to the grade recommended in the department committee’s report.

Structure of the Grievance Committee

The structure of the Grievance Committee will be as follows:

  • Two faculty members to be selected from the Student Academic Grievance Board. The faculty member against whom the grievance has been directed will propose four names from that panel, the student will strike two of those names, and the two remaining faculty members will serve.
  • Two students to be selected from a standing pool of eight students elected by the student government. The student filing the grievance will propose four names from that panel, the faculty member will strike two of those names, and the two remaining students will serve.

In the event that any faculty member or student selected through the foregoing process is unable to meet, another elected member of the panel will serve as an alternate.

The Grievance Committee will be chaired by a dean (other than the dean of the school in which the course was offered) to be selected by the PSVPAA. The dean so selected will have no vote except in the event of a tie, and will be responsible for overseeing the selection of the Grievance Committee, convening and conducting the committee meetings, and preparing the committee's report(s) and other appropriate documentation.

Due Process Procedure

  1. Both the student and the faculty member shall have the right to be present and to be accompanied by a personal advisor or counsel throughout the hearing.
  2. Both the student and the faculty member shall have the right to present and examine witnesses and to crossexamine witnesses.
  3. The administration shall make available to both the student and the faculty member such authority as it may possess to require the presence of witnesses.
  4. The Grievance Committee shall promptly and forthrightly adjudicate the issues.
  5. The full text of the findings and conclusions of the Grievance Committee shall be made available in identical form and at the same time to both the student and the faculty member. The cost shall be met by the university.
  6. In the absence of a defect in procedure, recommendations shall be made to the PSVPAA by the Grievance Committee as to possible action in the case.
  7. At any time should the basis for an informal hearing appear, the procedure may become informal in nature.

Grievance Process Complaints

Fairfield University endeavors to resolve all grievances, complaints and disputes in a timely and fair manner. In the event a student believes a complaint remains unresolved after the conclusion of Fairfield University's grievance and/or dispute resolution processes (including all appeals), the student may request that the complaint be reviewed by the State of Connecticut Office of Higher Education. The Office of Higher Education is responsible for quality review of independent colleges and will investigate complaints concerning matters within its statutory authority. For more information or to file a complaint, contact:

Office of Higher Education
61 Woodland Street
Hartford, CT 06105-2326
Phone: 800-842-0229
http://www.ctohe.org/studentcomplaints.shtml

Fairfield University is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). Students may contact:

NEASC
3 Burlington Woods Drive
Suite 100
Burlington, MA 01803
Phone: 855-886-3272
http://cihe.neasc.org/