Management

The management program in the Dolan School of Business offers an innovative approach to the leadership, strategic planning and decision-making in business organizations. Our Action Learning Module combines work experience with classes on management theory. The result is an innovative learning process that combines management theory with a grasp of the realities of the business world.You are given the option to choose between four concentrations: general management, human resource management, business and society, and entrepreneurship.

Our faculty is composed of business professionals and scholars. Their experience offers a connection between the practice and theory of the profession. As a major in the program, you will build a foundation of modern business experience and relevant theory to understand the behavioral, social, and environmental factors that impact performance. Throughout, you learn the nature of management, and the relationship between business and society.

To effectively prepare you and broaden your work experience, the program emphasizes case studies, research projects and internships. This blend of theory and hands-on experience provides you with a broad perspective of managerial effectiveness and the role it plays in the world of business, equipping you with the skills for a successful career in business or graduate school.

MG 0101 Introduction to Management3 Credits

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

This course integrates, through theory and its application, the various topics, concepts, and modalities that make up the Management discipline. Its purpose is twofold: 1) to provide all business students with a strong grounding in how individuals and organizations function to support the strategic goals of business, and 2) to provide a foundation for further study by management majors and minors. The course introduces students to team/group work; the relationship of business to local, national, and global communities; the ethical implications of business decisions and models; organizational behavior; human resource management; leadership and organizational culture.

MG 0235 Managing Human Resources3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course introduces students to how effective management of people can contribute to firm performance and competitive advantage. The course explores human resource management activities: human resource planning, recruiting, selection, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and labor relations. Through extensive use of cases, simulations, and exercises, students actively learn to implement various human resource management strategies to better serve organizational and employee interests.

MG 0240 Leading and Managing People3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course prepares students for the task of leading and managing people. The purpose of the course is to address advanced organizational behavior topics as well as to illuminate the research and practice associated with effective leadership. The first segment of the course reviews the leadership literature, including trait theory, aspects of leadership style, leader emergence, contingency theories, and charismatic/transformational leadership practices. The second segment involves skill practice in managing people in the areas of communication, conflict resolution, empowerment, delegation, influence, teamwork, problem solving, and diversity issues. The third and final segment explores strategic leadership from the CEO perspective, and addresses how leaders create change and transform organizations.

MG 0300 Business Strategies in the Global Environment3 Credits

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a business program, senior standing, completion of business core.

This capstone course, required for senior level students in the School of Business, integrates the business core through the concept of strategic management. It offers an opportunity for students to put together all they have learned in their discipline and to see the "big picture" of how business organizations function. The primary goal is to prepare students to think like top managers and to understand that strategic decision-making encompasses all parts of the organization, internal and external, bringing together all disciplines of management. The course includes lectures, readings, cases, and a capstone group project.

MG 0302 Topics in Human Resources3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course examines topics in human resource management as they relate to contemporary organizations. The course gives students an in-depth understanding of current issues or topics in the area of human resources, giving special attention to the strategic aspect of human resource management: how human resources can create value for the organization. Topics may include strategic human resource management; human resource systems; human resource planning; quality of work life; flexible work; diversity; affirmative action; legal aspects of employment; and work-family issues.

MG 0303 Topics in Management (Shell)3 Credits

Attributes: MGEL Management: General Elective

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course gives students an in-depth understanding of current issues and topics in management. The focus is on the application and analysis of managerial principles in contemporary problem solving. The faculty member teaching this course constructs course content around current developments in his or her research area. Topics may include decision-making in a chaotic environment; change management; organizational structure and design; health care; social justice; the political and social context of organizations; the consequences of the free market logic; leadership; the environment; diversity and gender; e-business; and managing virtual teams and organizations.

MG 0303C Topics in Management: Sports Media Platforms and Strategies3 Credits

Attributes: MGEL Management: General Elective

This course is a thorough examination of the most prominent sports media consumption platforms, covering how each has evolved over the last 100 years and how they all co-exist today. Guest speakers from leading sports media organizations and visits to network centers offer real-world insights and detailed understandings of the sports media landscape. Analyze how various businesses employ these platforms to engage fans and positively affect their bottom line.

MG 0303D Topics in Management: Healthcare Management3 Credits

This course will center on how the current disruption from volume to value is driving the business of healthcare organizations to measure quality and cost variation for every patient they serve. This management course will examine how this uncertain path to value based care delivery requires both new partnerships and a new integrated language to guide clinical, financial, and operational leaders on how to provide and measure better quality of care at a lower cost.

MG 0320 Diversity in the Workplace3 Credits

Attributes: UDIV U.S. Diversity

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course allows questions to be framed, and answers sought, with regard to the challenge of diversity in the work environment. The course uses readings, exercises, and real-world projects to formulate the following: a definition of diversity; an awareness of its impact on businesses and their managers; the identification of the challenges that diversity presents and the opportunities it allows for even more productive workplace interactions; and the necessary skills, attitudes, and patterns of critical thinking needed for effective leadership in this important area. The course presents issues in the specific real-life context of ethnic, racial, gender, and class groups.

MG 0330 Career Planning3 Credits

Prerequisites: MG 0235 or MG 0240; Junior standing.

This course prepares students for the job search while exploring theoretical issues in career development over the life span. Theories of career development covered include: life stage and career stage models, aspects of politics that shape careers, issues of derailment, technical career paths, gender issues in careers, mentoring, and new career models, such as the boundaryless career, the protean career, and the kaleidoscope career. Students undertake a resume revision process, develop a sample cover letter, participate in workshops on Internet job searching techniques, and practice mock interviews. An in-class session with members of the Career Planning Center is included. Students may also receive credit for a job shadowing assignment, attendance at Career Fairs, and other career-related activities. Open to management majors and minors only.

MG 0335 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course raises student awareness of the problems, opportunities, policies, and practices of the small-business enterprise and its unique role in the free enterprise system. The small-business firm is examined from conception of the opportunity to operation of the firm, including the creative idea, feasibility studies, the development of the business and financial plan, launching the venture, and managing the firm. Participants study case problems of small-business firms.

MG 0336 Social Entrepreneurship3 Credits

Attributes: MGEL Management: General Elective, MGEN Management: Entrepreneurship Elective

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course examines the tremendous opportunities that exist for creating value in the social sector. Using entrepreneurial frameworks and business metrics, social entrepreneurs are effecting change in domains that markets have failed to address. The objective of this course is to sensitize students to ways that firms can influence societal outcomes while continuing to be revenue generating, self-sustaining enterprises. The primary learning strategy will be through case presentations and discussions of current social entrepreneurs and their organizations. During the term, students will develop a business plan to support a viable social enterprise.

MG 0337 Technology Ventures3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course focuses on those skills necessary for success in technology entrepreneurship, beyond traditional business skills and entrepreneurial enthusiasm. These include managing an array of uncertainties including technology, market, resource and organizational. The primary objective of this course is to give students the formalized training necessary to understand and manage these uncertainties. Coursework will include exercises that require students to identify an unmet or underserved market need and a potential technological solution to serve this need with the goal of helping students establish the basis for new venture creation or product launch. This class will discuss both technology push and market pull innovations. The course will progress from technology development/acquisition, through market assessment, business model development, venture funding, and finally, preparation to launch.

MG 0338 Managing a Family Business3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course provides a foundation for understanding family businesses, which represent over 80% of the world's free economies. The dynamics of first generation start-ups or multi-generational family businesses are often unique, yet tenuous to manage. Regardless of whether you are a member of the managing family or assuming a position within the firm, comprehension of the idiosyncrasies of successfully managing their complex operations is imperative. Through class discussions, case studies, articles, role plays and your research project based on auditing a locally-based family enterprise, this course will enable you to analyze and consider participating in a family business. Guest lectures from local family businesses will provide real-world application of the theories and concepts discussed in class.

MG 0340 Critical Issues in Management3 Credits

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

This course applies the knowledge students have acquired from previous management courses by examining integrative topics and issues in both domestic and global contexts. The focus of the course reflects traditional core concepts and their application to emerging critical issues in the field of business management. Case studies and experiential learning are used to enhance the classroom pedagogy.

MG 0350 International Law3 Credits

Attributes: HASM Humanitarian Action Minor Skills/Method Course, WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course is a study of international laws, legal institutions, and the societal and cultural institutions that impact and regulate business activity throughout the world. The student is introduced to the risks of international business and how those risks differ from doing business domestically; the function and importance of public international law; the international commercial transaction and its potential problems; and the basic structure and principles of international trade law and negotiations for trade. Also discussed are the legal and ethical problems facing multinationals operating in a number of countries, including licensing and protection of international property rights, and a comparative analysis of host country employment laws. Special emphasis is placed on the developing countries and emerging markets, such as China, Russia, India, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and the Caribbean, with a comparative legal and cross-cultural perspective.

MG 0355 Organizational Culture3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

The notion of organizational culture is rooted in the assumption that organizations are greater than the sum of their material parts. Culture, therefore, is a means for close examination of the operating assumptions shaping organizational identity and behavior. Special emphasis is placed on organizational thinking, the presuppositions driving thinking, and the challenges that culture poses for substantive organizational change.

MG 0360 Negotiations and Dispute Resolution3 Credits

Attributes: EVAP Environmental Studies: Applied Professional Skills

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course builds skills in negotiating and managing disputes and explores various theories concerning negotiation styles, strategy and tactics, alternative dispute resolution, and the major legal and ethical issues in the field. The course strengthens negotiation skills, introduces the many formal and informal processes available for dispute resolution, and develops managers' ability to resolve and prevent disputes. The heart of the course is a series of experiential exercises that create opportunities to practice and develop the principles learned in the course.

MG 0365 Ethics and Technology in Business3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course examines the ways computer technologies may pose new kinds of ethical issues that call for fresh approaches to thinking ethically about business. The purpose of the course is to help students prepare to deal effectively with ethical issues of a technology they are likely to face in their careers.

MG 0370 Managing Non-Profit Organizations3 Credits

Attributes: HASM Humanitarian Action Minor Skills/Method Course, MGHR Management: HR Elective

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course provides students with an understanding of the nonprofit sector and exposure to fundamentals in managing nonprofit organizations. It explores a broad range of topics including: the role of nonprofits in society, executive leadership and governance relationships in nonprofit organizations, the legal framework of nonprofits, human resource management of staff and volunteers, marketing and public relations, fundraising, budgeting and financial management, and strategic planning in the nonprofit sector. Special emphasis will be placed on leadership and the unique challenges that nonprofit leaders face in local, national, and global environments.

MG 0375 Sports Management3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course examines effective and efficient management within the culture of sports organizations. It distinguishes the management requirements in sports organizations. Current issues in the various sports industries are analyzed and the actions of the industries' management are reviewed and critiqued. Different types of organizational structures are studied and their method for motivating, managing, and evaluating the performance of employees, individually and in teams, is discussed. This course also identifies effective management styles and places emphasis on the importance of sound communication skills and goal setting. The fundamental purpose of this class is to provide students with an understanding of how to apply the principles of business and/or the elements of organization to sport. Over the semester, students will have the opportunity to explore basic theories of management, human resource management, politics, finance, marketing, resource acquisition (fundraising and corporate support), sports law, broadcast properties, media and publicity, future trends in facilities as well as philosophical, sociological, and culture considerations of sport.

MG 0380 Performance, Compensation, and Reward3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

This course covers theories and practices for effective compensation management. Topics include strategic perspectives of compensation systems, determining pay structure, job analysis, and job evaluation, design and administration, external pay competitiveness, designing pay levels, employee contributions and individual pay, subjective performance evaluation and merit pay, alternative reward systems, employee benefits, government's role and compliance, pay discrimination, budgets and pay administration, and union role in wages and salary administration.

MG 0385 Managing People for Global Business3 Credits

Attributes: WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

This course recognizes the complexities of managing human resources in the global business arena. Modern-day business is characterized by the relentless pace of globalization, through formation of international collaborations, mergers, joint ventures, and the opening up of new markets such as China, India, and Eastern Europe. There has been a dramatic increase in virtual work teams across several countries, globally outsourced work, and cultural diversity in the workplace as more people move across national borders to work. As a result, human resource management practices like recruitment, training, compensation, performance management, and employee relations are more complex. Additionally legal and regulatory requirements of foreign countries, cultural differences, expatriate management, and workforce mobility become important considerations. This course analyzes these complexities along with in-depth study of the people-related issues in different countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Eastern Europe.

MG 0390 Cross-Cultural Management3 Credits

Attributes: WDIV World Diversity

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Globalization, the internationalization of markets and corporations, has changed the way modern corporations do business. This course examines major themes and issues in the area of cross-cultural management. It focuses on three perspectives: the values, attitudes, and behaviors that are common to a cluster of countries, specific to one country, or specific to a major cultural subgroup or subgroups within one country. It explores what happens when cultures clash, and the need to understand different approaches to doing business in a diverse world.

MG 0391 Internship3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Students may take two semesters of internship, approved by the department. Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Enrollment by permission only.

MG 0392 Internship3 Credits

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Students may take two semesters of internship, approved by the department. Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Enrollment by permission only.

MG 0393 Internship1 Credit

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Students may take two semesters of internship, approved by the department. Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Enrollment by permission only.

MG 0394 Internship1 Credit

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Students may take two semesters of internship, approved by the department. Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Enrollment by permission only.

MG 0397 Seminar in Management3 or 6 Credits

Attributes: MGEL Management: General Elective

This special program involving independent study and research under faculty guidance is also intended for students accepted in an approved internship. Open only to seniors majoring in management and approved by the department chair. Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or higher.

MG 0398 Seminar in Management3 or 6 Credits

This special program involving independent study and research under faculty guidance is also intended for students accepted in an approved internship. Open only to seniors majoring in management and approved by the department chair. Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or higher.

Professors

Gibson
Mainiero
McEvoy
Scheraga, chair 
Solomon
Strauss

Associate Professors

Bhattacharya
Cavanaugh
Giapponi
Schmidt

Assistant Professor

Moretz

Assistant Professor of the Practice

Daulerio

Lecturers

Allegretto
Cerrone
Day
Doris
Hamer
Hillgen-Santa
Pena
Roseman
Stafford