2014 Course Catalogs | Fairfield University Graduate Catalogs 2013-14 | Graduate Catalog - SOE | Academic Program | Course Descriptions 

MSMOT Course Descriptions

Students in the MSMOT Program are required to complete 12 courses (36 credits). This includes six required courses, two semesters of the capstone course and four electives. Upon earning 27 credits, students are qualified to take the first of the two capstone courses. Core courses will be selected from the areas of concentration that are (a) Management of Information Technologies, (b) Management of Design and Manufacturing, and (c) Strategic Management of Resources. The 12 courses should be taken within a five-year period to obtain the degree.

Bridge Courses

Students without prior formal knowledge and experience in probability and statistics, computer programming, and accounting are required to complete courses BR 1, BR 2 and BR 3 as early as possible.

BR 1 Probability and Statistics

This bridge requirement may be satisfied by an undergraduate level course in statistics and probability given by any accredited institution of higher learning. Courses at Fairfield University recommended for this bridge are MA 17 or  MA 217. (See undergraduate catalog or SOE website for a description.)

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BR 2 Computer Programming

This bridge requirement may be satisfied by an undergraduate level course in a programming language given by any accredited institution of higher learning. Courses at Fairfield University recommended for this bridge are SW 131 or CS 141. (See undergraduate catalog or SOE website for a description.)

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BR 3 Financial Accounting

This bridge requirement may be satisfied by an undergraduate-level course in financial accounting given by an accredited institution of higher learning. Courses at Fairfield University recommended for this bridge are AC 11 or AC 400. (See the Dolan School of Business catalog for a description.)

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Required Courses

AC 500 Accounting for Decision Making

This course emphasizes the use of accounting information by managers for decision-making. It is designed to provide managers with the skills necessary to interpret analytical information supplied by the financial and managerial accounting systems. The financial accounting focus is on understanding the role of profitability, liquidity, solvency and capital structure in the management of the company. The managerial accounting focus is on the evaluation of organizational performance of cost, profit, and investment centers. (Prerequisite: AC 400 or an equivalent course in financial accounting) Three credits.

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CP 551 Capstone I - Project Definition and Planning

In this first semester of the capstone course, students form project groups, conceive technical approaches to problem solutions, and develop detailed plans and a schedule for project activities. Students execute the planning process using appropriate professional software such as Microsoft Project. The course includes software refresher lectures early in the semester. Students in each team produce a detailed project plan defining the work to be done (task descriptions), the task/subtask organizational structure, task responsibilities (assigning who does what), the task execution schedule (using Gantt charts as managing tools), areas of risk and risk abatement concepts, and provide an explanation of the value of the work to be performed to fulfill the objectives. Three credits.

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CP 552 Capstone II - Project Execution and Results

The second semester of the capstone course concerns implementation of the project plan developed in the prior semester. This typically includes hardware fabrication, software development supporting analytical work, detailed design, experimental studies, system integration, and validation testing, all of which serve as proof of meeting project objectives in data and functional demonstrations. Project teams submit a final report for grading and make a formal presentation to faculty, mentors, and interested personnel from associated industries. Three credits.

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DM 460 Project Management

This course concentrates on the general methodology of managing a technology project from concept to operational use with emphasis on the functions, roles, and responsibilities of the project manager. Study of the basic principles and techniques related to controlling resources (i.e. people, materials, equipment, contractors, and cash flow) to complete a technology project on time and within budget while meeting the stated technical requirements. Through group and individual activities, including case study review, students will learn to apply project management tools and techniques. Three credits.

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GK 415 Information Systems

This course offers insights into the capabilities of modern software and computing systems, allowing prospective technology managers to discriminate between effective and ineffective applications of software and network systems - considerations essential to managing businesses that depend upon efficient data and information processing. The course covers inputs, outputs, storage, transmission media and information processing, and networking. The course presents current Information Technology (IT) topics designed to enable one with knowledge vital to a successful career as a manager. The student is provided with a knowledge of: hardware and software fundamentals, system categories, overviews of programming languages, networks and communications concepts, e-commerce concepts, cloud and distributed computing, middleware, database technology, ERP with an overview of the SAP product, system planning, systems development methodologies, traditional and object oriented analysis and design techniques, software package evaluation & selection techniques, IT management issues and practices. In class case studies are discussed and lectures may at times delve into deeper technical matters. This course provides the student with both conceptual and managerial knowledge as well as practical hands on knowledge, useful in joint project team settings and designed to allow one to better lead and participate in company projects. Three credits.

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MG 508 Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation: The Entrepreneurial Firm

This course begins by presenting cutting-edge concepts and applications so that students understand the dynamics of innovation, the construction of a well-crafted innovation strategy, and the development of well-designed processes for implementing the innovation strategy. It then focuses on the building of an entrepreneurial organization as a critical core competency in the innovation process. Concurrent with this, it focuses on the development and support of the internal entrepreneur or Intrapreneur as part of the process of developing organizational core competencies that build competitive comparative advantages that, in turn, allow the firm to strategically and tactically compete in the global marketplace. Topics explored include technology brokering, lead users, disruptive technologies and the use of chaos and complexity theory in the strategic planning process. Three credits.

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MG 584 Global Competitive Strategy

This course considers the formulation of effective policy and accompanying strategy actions, and the management of such policies and actions. It examines the role of the general manager in this process and presents the diversified issues and problems the management of a business firm may be required to consider and solve in strategic planning. This course also examines the problems and tasks of strategy implementation and the general manager’s function of achieving expected objectives and establishing new ones to assure the continuity of the business organization. Students are required to prepare a business plan as part of this course. Three credits.

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RD 460 Leadership in Technical Enterprise

This course introduces major leadership theories and explores the issues and challenges associated with leadership of technical organizations. The course integrates readings, experiential exercises, and contemporary leadership research theory. Participants investigate factors that influence effective organizational leadership as well as methods of enhancing their own leadership development. The course prepares executives, supervisors, and managers to master the complex interpersonal, social, political, and ethical dynamics required for leading modern organizations. Three credits.

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RD 500 An Introduction to Systems Engineering

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of systems engineering (SE) and their application to the development of complex systems.  It describes the role that systems engineering plays as an integral component of program management.  Topics include requirements analysis, concept definition, system synthesis, design trade-offs, risk assessment, interface definition, engineering design, system integration, and related systems engineering activities.  The Friedman-Sage matrix is used as a framework for analysis purposes.  The course defines the breadth and depth of the knowledge that the systems engineer must acquire concerning the characteristics of the diverse components that constitute the total system.  Case studies and examples from various industries are used to illustrate the systems engineering process. Three credits.

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RD 525 Principles of Quality Management

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of quality management including planning, assurance and control. It provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of statistical process control, total quality management, Six Sigma and the application of these concepts, philosophies, and strategies to issues arising in government and industry. Emphasis will be placed on both theory and implementation methods. Students will gain an understanding of the application of the numerical tools used by teams in the quality management problem-solving process. Statistical methods and case studies are employed. The course is designed to assist students in developing processes by which they will be able to implement these methods in their working environment. Three credits.

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NOTE:

The following section presents descriptions of typical courses that may be used to fulfill the elective requirements.

DM 405 Supply Chain Design

This course deals with the optimization of processes in a supply chain using analytical techniques and modeling. The term "supply chain" refers to all the resources required in moving material through a network of manufacturing processes, quality assurance measures, maintenance, and customer interfaces to produce, deliver, and maintain a product. These are modeled using simulation of this chain, permitting an analyst to design the supply chain and to predict its performance. Students are taught to create discrete simulation models that will reflect the actual performance of a supply chain, prior to committing investments in inventory, procurement and fabrication. These simulations offer three general benefits: a) may be used to achieve an optimized design; b) may be used in solving production expansion needs; and c) can be used to locate and correct problems in an existing manufacturing system. Three credits.

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DM 407 Design of Manufacturing Systems and Processes

In this course, students will learn the significance and ramifications of "Lean Manufacturing" practices and advantages they provide to a manufacturing company. They will learn how to analyze the cross functional processes and to understand how strategic business objectives are translated into specific actions involving facilities, equipment, new skills, and process improvements that must be achieved. Tactical planning and execution design are introduced using specific analytical techniques including: (1) statistical segmentation of demand, (2) production and inventory considerations of facility and product design, including the impacts of variability, (3) use of statistical segmentation for make-to-stock, make-to-order, and make-to-plan strategies, (4) introduction to replenishment techniques including: level loading, rhythm cycles and considerations for safety and cycle stock, and (5) use of postponement strategies in optimizing inventory control. Three credits.

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DM 420 Design for Economy and Reliability

Considerations of reliability permit a product to achieve a desired performance throughout its service life, thereby satisfying those who have purchased it. Careful thought and design produce reliability and economy of manufacture. This course instructs the prospective technology manager in the considerations leading to creation of cost-effective products of quality and presents: (1) the Total Design method, (2) concurrent engineering and the effective use of design reviews, (3) quality function deployment, (4) cost structures and models, (5) materials selection and economics, (6) robust design validation techniques and the Taguchi method, and (7) the Fault Tree and its use as a diagnostic aid in design validation. Three credits.

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DM 430 Management of Design for Automation

This course addresses the need for inherent flexibility in modern manufacturing systems that must accommodate changing product lines through the application of robotics and other forms of programmable automation, and the need to provide rapid, accurate communications between business managers, design engineers, and product managers. Effective product design requires a basic understanding of the manufacturing system being used in production including: mechanical design of all material manipulators and material handling equipment, design compatibility between all parts and the automation equipment considered for use. Coursework dealing with these issues includes: 1) the organization and scheduling of manufacturing processes, 2) the principles of programmable automation, 3) the theory and application of Boothroyd’s design for assembly methodology, 4) process cost estimation techniques, 5) methods for judging the soundness of investments in manufacturing equipment that a specific design may require, 6) market implications and the effect of design features on sales revenue and product market life, and 7) social impacts. Three credits.

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MG 500 Managing People for Competitive Advantage

This course focuses on effectively managing people in organizations by emphasizing the critical links between strategy, leadership, organizational change, and human resource management. The course assists students from every concentration including finance, marketing, information systems, and accounting to become leaders who can motivate and mobilize their people to focus on strategic goals. Topics include the strategic importance of people leading organizational change, corporate social responsibility, implementing successful mergers and acquisitions, and fundamentals of human resource practices. Discussions interweave management theory and real world practice. Class sessions are a combination of case discussions, experiential exercises, and lectures. Three credits.

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MG 503 Legal and Ethical Environments of Business

This course helps students become more responsible and effective managers when involved in the gray areas that call for insightful judgment and action. Students develop skills in logical reasoning, argument and incorporation of legal, social, and ethical considerations into decision-making. The course teaches the importance of legal and ethical business issues and enables students to make a difference in their organizations by engaging in reasoned consideration of the normative actions of the firm. Using the case study method, the course provides an overview of current topics, including the legal process, corporate governance, employee rights and responsibilities, intellectual property and technology, and the social responsibility of business to its various stakeholders. Three credits.

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MK 400 Marketing Management

This course examines analytical and managerial techniques that apply to marketing functions with an emphasis on the development of a conceptual framework necessary to plan, organize, direct, and control the product and strategies needed for promotion, distribution and pricing of a firm’s products. The course also considers the relationship of marketing to other units within a firm. Three credits.

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OM 400 Integrated Business Processes

Process management is concerned with the design and control of processes that transform inputs (such as labor and capital) into finished goods and services. Course topics include process mapping, quality management and control, capacity planning, supply chain management, and operations strategies. The course uses case studies to show how concepts and models presented in lectures and readings apply to real-world business situations. Three credits.

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RD 450 Management of Risk in Research and Development

This course addresses the formation and development of new ideas and their subsequent use in the creation of products and services. This involves the creation of systems developed from the integration of knowledge in design, development, software and economics and the application of Earned Value and Accountancy. The knowledge so gained is to be applied, often iteratively, to create new conceptions of products and service. This work simultaneously addresses performance and cost. Graphic methods for planning projects are instructed. In addition specialized analytical processes are presented that permit an evaluation and critique of new concepts. These processes and techniques are applied in group activities. In addition, the course requires essential research into specific issues. This research is to be undertaken as part of homework assignments on recommended subjects in which the students will learn the methods that serve to enhance their knowledge and communicate this to enrich the lecture sessions in each class. In summary, the means for developing new ideas and methods to apply them are presented in this course. These newly learned resources will be applied in group actions to gain experience in their use and thus create useful tools for future circumstances that require their application. Three credits.

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RD 485 Management of Intellectual Property

Intellectual property may exist in many forms and often goes unrecognized as a part of the wealth of corporations when it can actually represent the most valuable property a corporation holds. This course instructs students in how to recognize the different types of intellectual property and the different forms of protection that may be used to protect its loss to competitive agencies. In addition to enlightenment as to what form it may take, the students are instructed in how to determine its monetary value and how to use it to advance important company objectives such as increasing sales volume and how to establish policies and methods to protect it from theft by competitive firms. Throughout the course, students learn how to address the legal issues surrounding the rights of ownership and the existence of infringements. They recognize the specific issues that distinguish an invention (or any other form of intellectual property) from its competition, causing it to obtain an edge in the market place. Three credits.

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MSSE Course Descriptions

SW 400 Software Engineering Methods

This course explores the requirements gathering, system analysis, software design methods and prototyping of software application following the software processes required for the production of high quality software. Techniques for creating documentation and using software development tools will be presented. Students will gain experience in software project management; requirements, analysis, and design; procedural maturity; social, ethical, cultural, and safety issues in software development; interpersonal skills for management and team membership; and the software engineering discernment of systems architecture. Three credits.

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SW 401 Software Design Methods

This course is designed to introduce fundamental concepts of object orientation techniques. Through the use of case studies and project work that has the student gradually building a large design specification, students will achieve an understanding of how complex applications are designed and built. (Prerequisite: SW 400 or permission of the instructor.) Three credits.

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SW 402 Database Concepts

This course focuses on the steps required to build and maintain relational database infrastructure for modern n-tiered applications.  It covers logical and physical design; implementation of the database; the use of the database to meet the informational needs of a software system; and the installation, operation and maintenance of the software.  Specific topics include database design, SQL, interacting with the DBMS, backup and recovery of data security.  Students perform a number of hands-on exercises using the Oracle Database Server running on the Microsoft Windows platform.  This course serves as one of the bridge courses to the MSSE program.  Three credits.

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SW 404 Network Concepts

This course covers the structure and technologies of computer networks architecture including cabling, wiring hubs, file servers, bridges, routers, and network interface cards. It discusses network software and hardware configurations and demonstrates network concepts such as configuring protocol stacks and connecting a personal computer to a network. The course examines the OSI-model, TCP/IP protocol and routing protocols. Student will be able to do subnet of TCP/IP networks. Three credits.

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SW 406 Web Client Side Development I

This course introduces the student to developing browser applications for use on the web. Students learn client side concepts including the display of static information. The course topics include designing and authoring web pages, usability, search engine optimization, markup languages, style sheet, the client side document object model, and making web pages dynamic on the client side. Three credits.

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SW 409 Advanced Programming in Java

This course covers advanced topic of Java programming. Topic covers multithreading, networking, nested references, design patterns, JDBC, persistence, I/O and advanced GUI such as swing. Data structure concepts such as linked list, tree and basic searching and sorting algorithms will be covered. Lab included. (Prerequisite: SW 407 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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SW 410 Enterprise Java

Advanced server-side Java technologies. Coverage includes state-of-the-art explorations into server-side technologies such as JDBC, Google Web Toolkit, Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB), Android, XML, etc., as time permits. Lab included. (Prerequisite: SW 409 or permission of the instructor.) Three credits.

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SW 420 Software Testing and Maintenance

This course will cover in-depth methods for software testing, reliability and maintenance of software. Students will learn the principles of software testing and how to apply software testing techniques to the development of quality software and how to deploy software systems, maintain, enhance and reuse software systems. (Prerequisite: SW 400) Three credits

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SW 421 Software Project Management

This course explores software project activities from conception to completion based on best practices. Topics include software systems engineering, personal/team software process management and control, and project planning and management. Through group and individual activities, students apply project management tools and techniques, and address typical problems that occur during the life cycle of the software project. (Prerequisite: SW 407 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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SW 427 Operating Systems and Programming

This course introduces the internal operation of modern operating systems and students learn how to program on non-Window OS platform. The topics cover a brief history of operating system, the major components of modern operating systems, and the object-oriented methodology on UNIX-like platform. Various UNIX tools will be used in the course and participants study examples using object-oriented programs as well as large system integration by object-oriented methodology. (Prerequisite: SW 407 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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SW 448 Server Management

Server Management is a course designed to provide the student with the tools necessary to manage Window Server. The topics include user management, installation and configuration of web server, mail server, FTP server, LDAP and backup and other routine system and network administration. Three credits.

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SW 482 Special Topics

This course provides an in-depth study of selected topics in software engineering of particular interest to the students and instructor. The course is counted as a major elective/specialization course. The topics and prerequisites will be announced when this course is offered.  Three credits.

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SW 483 Independent Study

This course is an individualized study under the supervision of the faculty member. The course emphasizes individual creativity. Students work with a faculty mentor in studying and investigating topics of current interest in software engineering. Students may earn from one to three credits for an independent study course. (Prerequisite: permission of the instructor) One to three credits.

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SW 499 Algorithms

This course explores the development and evaluation of algorithms. This class covers classic algorithms, algorithm analysis, searching and sorting algorithms, dynamic programming, heuristics, and graphic algorithms. Algorithm efficiency and performance is a focus as the student gains experiences through problems and programming projects. (Prerequisite: SW 407 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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SW 505 Advanced Database Concepts

This course covers topics in database implementation designed to provide software engineers with a wide variety of server-side problem solving techniques. Topics include cursors, query and index optimization, advanced SQL programming, distributed databases, object-oriented databases, clustering, partitioning, and working with XML and other unstructured data. While Microsoft SQL Server is primarily used for demonstration, the topics covered are applicable to any database platform, and the different approaches of the major database vendors are frequently contrasted. Format consists of lecture and lab. (Prerequisites: SW 402 and SW 407, or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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SW 506 Visual C# for Programmers II

This course teaches application developers the more advanced elements of programming with Visual C# for the .NET framework. Students learn object oriented programming using classes, objects and inheritance, and cover topics such as multithreading, design patterns, and advanced GUI. Data structure concepts such as linked list, tree and basic searching and sorting algorithms will be covered. At the completion of this course, students will be able to produce complete Windows and console based applications with Visual C#. Lab included. (Prerequisite: SW 407 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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SW 508 Data Warehouse Systems

This course examines the tools, techniques and processes used in the design and development of data warehouses. As such we will examine how to successfully gather structure, analyze, and understand the data to be stored in the data warehouse, discuss techniques for modeling the data in the data warehouse, discuss the ETL process and describe techniques for presenting and analyzing the data in the warehouse. We will also discuss capacity planning and performance monitoring. Microsoft Analysis Services and Sybase ASIQ will be examined as approaches for implementing a data warehouse. (Prerequisite: SW 402 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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SW 512 Web Development II with ASP.NET

This course teaches site developers how to create robust, scalable, data-driven ASP.NET Web. Students learn how to create ASP.NET applications using a text editor and the command-line tools, as well as using Visual Studio. Topics include the .NET framework, web forms, validation controls, database connectivity, web services, component development, user controls, custom server controls, and best practices, etc. At the end of the course, students are able to describe the issues involved in creating an enterprise web site, creating and publishing a web site, creating interactive content for a Web site, adding server scripting to a Web page using ASP.NET, implementing security in a Web site, and reading and writing information to a database from ASP.NET. (Pre- or co-requisites: SW 406 and SW 506 or permission of the instructor.) Three credits.

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SW 516 High Performance Database Web Applications

This course is an introduction to the PHP programming language. Topics include installation and configuration with the Apache http server, variables and data types, language syntax, control structures, functions, strategies and tools for handling input and generating output, error handling, sending email, manipulating dates and times, string manipulation and regular expressions, SQL and MySQL database access. The course also covers advanced topics such as MVC model-based web application development using framework and packages from the PHP Extension and Application Repository (PEAR). At the conclusion of the course, students are able to design and implement scalable data-driven web applications. (Prerequisites: SW 406, or by permission of the instructor). Three credits.

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SW 518 Data Mining and Business Intelligence

This course examines business intelligence concepts, methods and processes used to improve data-centric business decision support solutions with a particular focus on data mining techniques. We will first examine the principles and practices of gathering and retrieving large volumes of data for analysis and synthesis. Next we will examine analytical techniques for extracting information from large data sets. In particular, the course examines the following data mining techniques: classification, estimation, prediction, and clustering. During the course we will also discuss knowledge management, how organizations manage and use the knowledge that they acquire, and presentation of data. Three credits.

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SW 530 Introduction to Information Security

This course gives students a fundamental understanding of current Social Engineering methods in the Information Security arena. Deception and human behavior is exploited to gain valuable information, which is very relevant to today’s growing security concerns. This course is another key class in the Information Security track in the MSSE program and builds upon the weaknesses in the human factor. Areas of discussion will be methods, current trends, and most of all countermeasures. Instruction includes lectures and discussion assignments which involve analyzing current work places and social gatherings coupled with scenarios of exploitation. Three credits.

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SW 531 Applications and Data Security

This course is structured around enterprise and web applications and the data security associated with these applications. It encompasses the encryption schemes of transmission to execution of code and complete flight of an execution.  Common countermeasure and best business practices that help ensure a solid security understanding are the objective of the course. Three credits.

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SW 550 and SW 551 Capstone Professional Project I and II

In these two semester capstone courses, students form teams, perform a technical study, and design software systems based on either their customer's requirements, develop, test, and deploy software systems. The results of these projects provide a library of case studies, designs, and software development techniques, and project management skills that are of general interest to local information technology professionals. A capstone prospectus, approved by your advisor, must be submitted to and accepted by the director of the program prior to starting the capstone sequence. (Prerequisites: SW 401 and completion of 18 credits MSSE courses at the minimum.) Six credits for the two-course sequence.

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SW 560 and SW 561 Software Engineering Thesis I and II

In these two semester thesis courses, a student will work on individual research project that a student should formulate as a problem, solve it under the guidance of a faculty member and communicate the results. Work involves literature search, writing a proposal, analysis and/or implementation with critical thinking, and writing convincingly. The student must also submit a final paper for possible publication in a refereed journal appropriate to the topic. (Prerequisites: SW 401 and completion of 18 credits of MSSE courses at the minimum) Six credits for the two-course sequence.

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SW 596 Network Routing and Switching

The course presents concepts and develops skills needed in designing, implementing, and troubleshooting local and wide-area networks. Students design and configure LAN, WAN using routers/switches and learn component of wireless networks and how to configure it and troubleshoot the network and optimize its performance. It also provides numerous lab opportunities to configure and troubleshoot networks with Cisco routers and switches (Prerequisite: SW 404) Elective. Three credits.

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SW 599 Information Security Measures and Countermeasures

This course covers current information security practices and countermeasures put in place to safeguard against security breaches. The course reviews Internet infrastructures such as firewalls, IDS systems, and honey pots. Additional areas include risk analysis, computer-use policies, physical security, Internet/intranet security, Malware, firewall infrastructure, and current information security issues. (Prerequisite: SW 404) Elective. Three credits.

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MSECE Course Descriptions

Bridge Courses

Required to complete one's preparation for the master's program is strong aptitude in the area of electric circuits, fields and waves, electronic circuits and devices. Students with deficiencies in those areas should confer with the Program Director to create a course of study. (See undergraduate catalog or visit the SOE website for a description.)

ECE 405 Electronic Materials

This course describes the properties and applications of certain materials used in the design and manufacture of electronic assemblies. Ceramics are often used as insulators, heat sinks, and substrates for interconnection structures. The course presents electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of various ceramics, along with methods of fabricating and machining ceramic structures. Adhesives used to mount components and to replace mechanical fasteners such as screws and rivets provide connections that are stronger and take up less space. The course examines properties of adhesives such as epoxies, silicones, and cyanoacrylates under conditions of high temperature storage and humidity, along with methods of applications. Solders used to interconnect electronic components and assemblies are selected for temperature compatibility, mechanical properties, and reliability. The course emphasizes the new lead-free solder materials and presents the properties of plastic materials and the methods of forming plastic structures. (Prerequisite: EE degree or equivalent) Three credits.

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ECE 406 Advanced Digital Design

This course covers modern methods of digital logic design via VHDL (VHSIC Hardware Description Language) and modern design methodology. Programmable Device Architectures are discussed. Targeting both FPGA and CPLD devices, structural, behavioral, and data-flow VHDL models are developed for familiar logic and arithmetic circuits, and state machines. The difference in coding for synthesis and coding for simulation is stressed. Further development of VHDL Language skills is performed in the context of an introduction to Computer Architecture. Memory and Bus models are discussed. Design projects apply the theory to practical problems. (Prerequisite: CR 245 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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ECE 407 Fiber Optic Transmission and Communication

This course examines the theory and basic elements of fiber optic communications systems; fundamentals of transmission in optical fibers; source component operations including light emitting diodes and solid-state lasers; and coupling element and detector devices. Students analyze modulation and demodulation techniques and determine overall loop performance relative to bandwidth and signal-to-noise ratio. Design problems enhance student understanding. (Prerequisites: EE 231, EE 301) Three credits.

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ECE 407L Fiber Optic Transmission and Communication Laboratory

Students are introduced to fiber optics with experiments on Snell’s Law and total internal reflection. Students then use optical test equipment to measure the characteristics and applications of fiber optic cables, including simple communication systems. Fiber optic characteristics may include losses due to transmission, mismatch, and bending, optical fiber connections and splicing, and frequency response. Both in-lab computer assisted instruction and a textbook will be used to supplement the experiments. Students prepare laboratory reports each week on their results. (Co-requisite: ECE 407) One credit.

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ECE 410 Voice and Signal Processing

This course supports the signal processing and computer systems domain. It provides an overview of digital audio and its application, and discusses the current state of streaming audio on the Internet and digital audio processing fundamentals. Students apply these theories by creating programs that synthesize and process music and voice. The course exposes students to the elements of multimedia network delivery of audio content. (Prerequisite: Some Java programming or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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ECE 415 Engineering Applications of Numerical Methods

This course provides students with the theoretical basis to proceed in future studies. Topics include root-finding, interpolation, linear algebraic systems, numerical integration, numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, modeling, simulation, initial boundary value problems, and two point boundary value problems. (Prerequisite:  programming language skills) Three credits.

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ECE 420 Readings in Electrical and Computer Engineering

Students formulate a project proposal, perform literature surveys, and learn the finer points of technical writing and presentation at the graduate level. The course requires a meta-paper written about the literature in the field. It emphasizes the basics of technical writing and research, and is organized to emphasize methods of the writing and the research process. Students learn to state a problem, the techniques of analysis, methods of investigation, and functional organization.  Three credits.

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ECE 425 Thermal Management of Microdevices

This course considers the generation and removal of heat in electronic assemblies. The course describes the sources of heat in an electronic assembly, such as the contribution of the switching speed and the “ON” resistance of field effect transistors at the device level, covers the effects of heat on system reliability analytically, and describes the resulting failure mechanisms in detail. It presents methods of removing heat from electronic circuits, including heat pipes, Peltier effect devices (thermoelectric coolers), and convection, using both gases and fluids to transfer heat, and describes methods of measuring heat, including contact and non-contact methods. (Prerequisite: EE degree or equivalent) Three credits.

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ECE 430 Image Processing

This first course in image processing with biomedical applications covers image algebra, arithmetic operations, Boolean operations, matrix operations, achromatic and colored light, selecting intensities, Gamma correction, chromatic color, psychophysics, color models, color space conversion, low-level pattern recognition, as well as video processing, compression and two-dimensional streaming, and multi-resolution multimedia network streaming. This course requires substantial programming effort and emphasis is placed on good software engineering practices. Students write image-processing applications. (Prerequisite: ECE 410 or CR 310 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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ECE 431 Biomedical Signal Processing

This course presents an overview of different methods used in biomedical signal processing. Signals with bioelectric origin are given special attention and their properties and clinical significance are reviewed. In many cases, the methods used for processing and analyzing biomedical signals are derived from a modeling perspective based on statistical signal descriptions. The purpose of the signal processing methods ranges from reduction of noise and artifacts to extraction of clinically significant features. The course gives each participant the opportunity to study the performance of a method on real, biomedical signals. (Prerequisites: Some Java programming or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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ECE 432 Biomedical Imaging

The course presents the fundamentals and applications of common medical imaging techniques, for example: x-ray imaging and computed tomography, nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and optical imaging. In addition, as a basis for biomedical imaging, introductory material on general image formation concepts and characteristics are presented, including human visual perception and psychophysics. (Prerequisite: ECE 431) Three credits.

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ECE 433 Biomedical Visualization

An introduction to 3D biomedical visualization. Various technologies are introduced, include UltraSound, MRI, CAT scans, PET scans, etc. Students will learn about spatial data structures, computational geometry and solid modeling with applications in 3D molecular and anatomical modeling. (Prerequisite: Some Java programming or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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ECE 435 Microelectronics

This course considers the methods of interconnecting electronic components at very high circuit densities and describes methods of designing and fabricating multilayer printed circuit boards, co-fired multilayer ceramic substrates, and multilayer thin film substrates in detail. It discusses the methods of depositing thick and thin film materials, along with their properties, and analyzes these structures and compares them for thermal management, high frequency capability, characteristic impedance, cross-coupling of signals, and cost. The course also includes techniques for mounting components to these boards, including wire bonding, flip chip, and tape automated bonding. (Prerequisite: EE degree or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ECE 440 Computer Graphics

This course supports the visualization and computer systems domain with computer gaming applications. It is an introduction to GUI and game design and computer graphics concepts. Topics include human-computer interfaces using the AWT; applied geometry; homogeneous coordinate transforms. (Prerequisite: Some Java programming or permission of the instructor.) Three credits.

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ECE 441 Computer Systems Architecture

An investigation into computer architectures (past, present and future). We will explore various hardware and software techniques designed to maximize parallelism and improve performance. Front-end design (branch prediction, instruction fetch, trace caches), HW/SW techniques of parallelism, Memory system design (caching, prefetching), Technology issues (low power, scaling, reliability, nanotechnology), multiprocessors. Class will include a mix of lectures and discussions on assigned readings of recent publications. Students will be responsible for leading and participating in these discussions. A course project exploring a particular topic in depth will be required. (Prerequisite CR 245 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

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ECE 445 Digital Integrated Circuit Design

This course considers the design and layout of digital integrated circuits. It presents the fabrication, structure, and properties of CMOS devices in detail along with the structure of basic building blocks, such as flip-flops and counters, and covers digital circuit design techniques and simulation. Students learn how to lay out digital circuits to incorporate the design requirements. The course also discusses custom integrated circuit specification and design techniques, along with economics. Three credits.

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ECE 447 Analog Integrated Circuit Design

This course considers the design of CMOS analog integrated circuits. The fabrication, structure, and properties of analog CMOS devices are presented in detail along with the structure of basic building blocks, such as current mirrors and operational amplifiers. Students design and simulate circuits using Spice and lay out analog CMOS circuits using software designed for this purpose. (Prerequisite: EE 331 or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ECE 448 Embedded Microcontrollers

Introduction to embedded microcontrollers in electronic and electromechanical systems. Hardware and software design techniques are explored for user and system interfaces, data acquisition and control. These tools are used to develop software code for practical applications such as motor speed control and voltage regulation for power supplies.  Three credits.

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ECE 448L Embedded Microcontroller Laboratory

This laboratory covers the basic operation and applications of a microprocessor. Students learn to program a microprocessor to control applications such as motor speed by the use of an emulator connected to a PC. They design a circuit using a microprocessor for a specific application and write a program to control the circuit. On completion of the program, they use the emulator to program an actual microprocessor for use in their circuit. (Co-requisite: ECE 448.) One credit.

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ECE 450 Computer Animation

This overview of computer animation techniques includes traditional principles of animation, physical simulation, procedural methods, and motion-capture-based animation. The course discusses computer science aspects of animation, with lessons ranging from kinematic and dynamic modeling techniques to an exploration of current research topics - motion re-targeting, learning movements and behaviors, and video-based modeling and animation. Class projects offer hands-on animation experience.  Three credits.

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ECE 451 Nanoelectronics I

Building on the two introductory courses in nanotechnology, this course is the first of two that describe how nanotechnology can be integrated into the electronics industry. The unique electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of structures in the nanometer range and how they may be applied to electronics products are discussed. Principles of electronic materials, semiconductor devices, and microfabrication techniques will be extended to the nanoscale. Students will increase their knowledge of electronic structure, quantum mechanics, and the behavior of optoelectronic and low-dimensional systems. Students make extensive use of the available literature to seek out potential applications of nanotechnology. Intended for students interested in the minor in nanotechnology - Nanoelectronics track. Also open to interested graduate students in ECE. Lecture course. (Prerequisite: EG 212 or permission of the instructor). Three credits.

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ECE 452 Nanoelectronics II

This second course in Nanoelectronics emphasizes present and potential applications of nanotechnology in the various fields of next-generation electronics. The course will discuss topics relevant to electromagnetism at the nanoscale, MEMS/NEMS, nanosensors, nano-optics, molecular electronics, and nanoelectronic interfaces with biology. Student teams will survey the available literature and companies involved in designing and manufacturing devices with Nanoelectronics as a core to select a product for analysis in terms of technical and economic advantages, and present their findings. Teams of students also conceptualize a potential product, and perform the same analysis. Intended for students interested in the minor in nanotechnology - Nanoelectronics track. Also open to interested graduate students in ECE. (Prerequisite: ECE 315 /ECE 451). Three credits.

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ECE 455 Sensor Design and Application

This course covers the design, fabrication, and properties of sensors intended to measure a variety of parameters, such as stress, temperature, differential pressure, and acceleration. Sensors of different types are used in a wide range of equipment, especially automated equipment, to detect changes in state and to provide the signals necessary to control various functions. Sensors are generally connected to electronics systems that process and distribute the signals. The support electronics must identify the signal, separate it from noise and other interference, and direct it to the appropriate point. These support electronics are a critical part of the sensor technology; students discuss their design and packaging in detail. (Prerequisite: EE degree or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ECE 457 Advanced Linear Systems

This course considers the use of Laplace transforms to solve linear systems with multiple time constants and the solution of multiple linear simultaneous equations. The analysis of linear systems usually results in the generation of transfer functions in s, the Laplace transform variable. Particular attention is given to the electrical and mechanical implementation of these transfer functions in linear systems using both analysis and synthesis techniques. (Prerequisite: EE 301 or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ECE 460 Network Programming

This course covers principles of networking and network programming. Topics include OSI layers, elementary queuing theory, protocol analysis, multi-threading, command-line interpreters, and monitors. Students write a distributed computing system and check their performance predictions with experiments.  Three credits.

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ECE 461 Green Power Generation

This course compares various methods of green power generation including solar power, wind power, water power, and several others.  This course covers how power is generated from these sources, the startup costs, the efficiency, and the practicality.  These methods are compared to the present most common method of using oil and gas to heat water into steam to turn turbines.  The student does not necessarily need a background in engineering and any necessary background material will be covered to the understanding of all.  Three credits.

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ECE 465 Nonlinear Control Systems

Control systems are used in many industrial applications to control processes or operations and in many non-industrial applications as well. Nonlinear control systems are frequently used in applications where the control variables have a wide dynamic range. Unlike linear systems, the analysis of nonlinear systems rarely results in a closed-form mathematical expression. This course considers the analysis and applications of nonlinear control systems by numerical and graphical techniques and considers means of implementing the solutions. (Prerequisites: EE 302 or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ECE 470 Network Embedded Systems

This course covers distributed development - connecting peripherals to networks via Java. Plug-and-play paradigm is used to add services on the fly. Students learn about the following topics: multicast and unicast protocols, service leasing, lookup services, remote events, sharing data between distributed processes, and distributed transactions. The course also covers interfacing hardware (sensors, robotics, etc.) to the Web. Three credits.

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ECE 475 Microwave Structures I

This course considers the analysis and design of structures used in microwave transmission and reception. The course covers distributed parameters in detail, leading to a discussion of the properties of transmission lines. It presents the utilization of distributed parameter structures to design filters, couplers, and mixers, along with methods of implementation. Also included are strip line and microstrip transmission lines and filters. The course discusses microwave devices, both Si and GaAs, including low-power and high-power devices and laser diodes. (Prerequisite: EE 321 or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ECE 476 Microwave Structures II

This course is a continuation of ECE 475 and covers the design and analysis of microwave amplifiers, oscillators and mixers, frequency multipliers, and antennas. The course begins by presenting electrical models of RF components and relating those models to design methods. The effects of internal and external noise are considered in the models. Practical applications and design are emphasized. (Prerequisite: ECE 475). Three credits.

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ECE 480 Wireless Systems I

The applications of wireless communication are expanding rapidly - from cellular phones to wireless internet to household appliances - and involve many disciplines other than microwave transmission. This course covers several aspects of wireless communication, including antenna design, FCC regulations, and multi-channel transmission protocols. In addition, it discusses modern design approaches such as Bluetooth. Students learn how analog and digital signals are coded. The course also discusses transmission during interference and EMI/RFI as well as fiber optics communication. (Prerequisite: EE 321 or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ECE 481 Wireless Systems II

This is a continuation of ECE 480. The topics to be covered include diversity, coding, multiple antennas, and equalization. Modern applications requiring Multicarrier Modulation and Spread Spectrum techniques are also discussed. The course concludes with an examination of 3G and 4G methods and applications. (Prerequisite: ECE 480) Three credits.

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ECE 483 Independent Study

Students pursue special topics, projects, and/or readings in selected areas. Students must meet with the instructor to discuss the proposed topic of study. (Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.) Three credits.

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ECE 485 Digital Communications

This course is designed to explore current digital communications features, including network communications between computers. It includes discrete time signals and systems, Z-transforms, discrete Fourier transforms, fast Fourier transforms, digital filter design, and random signals. Fundamentals of sampling principles and channel coding are utilized to develop common baseband and digital modulation techniques (ASK, FSK, PSK, PCM, and delta modulation). Transmission over bandwidth constrained channels, and signal detection and extraction. Multiplexing and multiple access networks are also analyzed. The lecture material is illustrated with practical examples. (Prerequisite: EE 301 or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ECE 490 Analog Communication Systems

The course focuses on analog communication systems and the effects of noise on those systems, developing modulation and demodulation techniques (amplitude, frequency, and phase modulation and pulse code). It discusses dealing with non-linear system elements and presents a mathematical treatment of the effects of various noise sources on these systems. Historical design studies and topics in communication applications permit students to apply these concepts to meet system requirements. The course clarifies important concepts through simulation of modulation techniques on multimedia computing systems. (Prerequisite: EE 301.) Three credits.

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ECE 495 Power Generation and Distribution

This course considers the generation and distribution of electrical power to large areas. Three-phase networks are described in detail, including both generators and loads. Methods of modeling distribution systems by per-unit parameters are covered, along with power factor correction methods. Fault detection and lightning protection methods are also described. Some economic aspects of power generation and distribution are presented. (Prerequisite: EE degree or permission of instructor.) Three credits.

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ECE 496 Fault Analysis in Power Systems

This course covers three types of faults in electrical power grids: open lines, lines shorted to ground, and lines shorted to each other. Methods of locating faults are covered, along with an analysis of the effects. Methods of protection and fault isolation are also covered. (Prerequisite: ECE 495.) Three credits.

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ECE 505 Advanced Power Electronics

This course considers the design and application of electronic circuits related to power generation and conversion including inverters, power supplies, and motor controls. Topics include AC-DC, DC-DC, DC-AC, AC-AC converters, resonant converters, and the design of magnetic components. Models of electric motors and generators are presented to facilitate the design of controls for these structures. (Prerequisite: EE 331 or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ECE 510L Product Design Laboratory

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience in measuring and analyzing the electrical and mechanical properties of materials used in the design of electronic products. It also covers thermal analysis and methods of removing the heat from electronic circuits. Experiential learning includes measurement of temperature coefficient of expansion, measurement of thermal resistance, measurement of tensile strength, measurement of material hardness, temperature measurement of electronic components, Peltier effect (thermoelectric coolers), heat pipes, convection cooling (fins and air flow), and heat flow across a bonding interface such as solder or epoxy. (Prerequisite: ECE 405 or equivalent.) One credit.

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ECE 515L Microelectronics Laboratory

This laboratory provides students with an understanding of the processes used to fabricate thick and thin film circuits. As part of their experiential learning, students sputter several materials onto a ceramic substrate and investigate the properties of the sputtered film, such as resistivity and adhesion. Students screen print thick film materials, including conductors, resistors, and insulators onto a ceramic substrate and fire them at an elevated temperature, and investigate the properties of the fired film, plot the distribution of resistor values, and apply statistical methods to determine design curves. Students solder components to the substrates to complete a circuit and analyze the properties of the finished circuit. (Corequisite: ECE 435.) One credit.

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ECE 520L System Design Laboratory

This laboratory provides students with an understanding of sensors and non-linear control systems. Experiments include temperature sensors such as thermocouples, thermistors, and infrared, motion sensors, strain gauges, nonlinear servos, and computer analysis of nonlinear systems. (Corequisite: ECE 455 or equivalent.) One credit.

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ECE 525L Communications Systems Laboratory

In this laboratory, students acquire hands-on experience with waveguides, transmission lines, and antennas. They learn how to characterize these structures at microwave frequencies and examine how they affect transmission. They set up prototype wireless transmission systems and transmit and receive analog and digital systems. They analyze the data for integrity and accuracy of transmission. Experiential learning includes measurement of characteristic impedance of transmission lines, simple antenna design (students construct simple antennas and determine the effect of the design on directionality and other parameters), and wireless concepts (students build a wireless communications system and send data back and forth, one-way and two-way; this can be a capstone project involving teams to design and analyze various aspects). (Prerequisite: ECE 476 or equivalent.) One credit.

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ECE 530L Power Electronics Laboratory

This laboratory provides hands-on experience in analyzing and designing power electronics circuits and in analyzing and modeling power generation and distribution systems. Students design and construct voltage regulators, switching power supplies, and motor controllers. Students also develop circuit models for AC and DC motors and power transformers. Experiential learning includes developing circuit models for power distribution systems, measuring parameters of motors and transformers and using the data to develop electrical circuit models of these devices, and analyzing the properties of power distribution systems and developing computer models for them. (Corequisite: ECE 505 or equivalent.) One credit.

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ECE 550, ECE 551, ECE 552 Thesis I, II, III

The master's thesis tests students' abilities to formulate a problem, solve it, and communicate the results. The thesis is supervised on an individual basis. A thesis involves the ability to gather information, examine it critically, think creatively, organize effectively, and write convincingly; it is a project that permits students to demonstrate skills that are basic to academic and industry work. The student must also submit a paper for possible inclusion in a refereed journal appropriate to the topic. (Prerequisite: ECE 420.) Six to nine credits.

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MSME Course Descriptions

MC 400 Feedback and Control Systems

This course emphasizes analysis and synthesis of closed loop control systems using both classical and state-space approaches with an emphasis on electro-mechanical systems. The mathematical requirements include the Laplace transform methods of solving differential equations, matrix algebra and basic complex variables. The discussion of classical control system design includes the modeling of dynamic systems, block diagram representation, time and frequency domain methods, transient and steady state response, stability criteria, controller action [Proportional (P), proportional and integral (PI), Proportional, integral and derivative (PID) and pseudo-derivatives feedback], root locus methods, the methods of Nyquist and Bode and dynamics compensation techniques. The discussion of state-space methods includes formulation and solution (analytical and computer-based) of the state equations and pole-placement design. The course integrates the use of computer-aided analysis and design tools (MATLAB) so as to ensure relevance to the design of real world controlled electro-mechanical systems using case studies and applications to electrical and mechanical systems. Includes lab (hardware based) exercises. Prerequisites: MA 321 and ME 203 (see undergraduate catalog), or equivalent. Three credits.

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ME 410 Vibration Analysis

This course covers fundamental laws of mechanics, free and forced vibration of discrete single and multi-degree- of-freedom systems, periodic and harmonic motion, viscous damping, and measures of energy dissipation. Modal analysis for linear systems, computational methods in vibration analysis, natural frequencies and mode shapes, analytical dynamics and Lagrange’s equation, longitudinal, torsional, and flexural vibration of continuous elastic systems (strings, rods, beams) are discussed. Students learn energy methods, approximate methods for distributed parameter systems, and dynamic response by direct numerical integration methods. (Prerequisites: ME 203, MC 290, or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ME 411 Advanced Kinematics

Topics in advanced kinematics include introduction to basic concepts and definitions related to kinematics, commonly used links and joints, kinematic anaylsis of mechanisms, introduction to robotic mechanisms, homogeneous transformations, Euler angles, Denavit-Hartenberg representation of forward kinematics of robots, inverse kinematics solution of robots, degeneracy and dexterity, and differential motion and velocity relations.  Industrial application of kinematics will also be covered and the course will include a laboratory or project component. (Prerequisite: ME 203 or equivalent)  Three credits.

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ME 412 Advanced Dynamics

The topics in the area of Dynamics include degrees of freedom, generalized coordinates, constraints, principle of virtual work and D'Alembert’s principle. Energy and momentum, frames of reference, orbital motion, Lagrange's equation, moments and products of inertia, and dynamics of rigid bodies are also discussed, as well as variational principles: stationary value of a function, Hamilton's principle, principle of least action, Hamilton's equation, and phase space. (Prerequisites: ME 203, or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ME 425 Engineering Applications of Numerical Methods

See ECE 415.

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ME 427 Applications of Fracture Mechanics in Engineering Design

This course covers fracture mechanics concepts for design, materials selection, and failure analysis. The fundamental principles of fracture parameters and criteria, stress field at the tip of a crack, fracture toughness, thickness effect, plastic zone concept, and crack growth under cyclic loading and aggressive environment will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the practical applications of fracture mechanics by incorporation of design problems and laboratory demonstrations in the course. (Prerequisite: the equivalent of ME 308 or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ME 428 Computational Fluid Dynamics

Introduction to computational methods used for the solutions of advanced fluid dynamics problems. Emphasis on concepts in finite difference methods as applied to various ordinary and partial differential model. Equations in fluid mechanics, fundamentals of spatial discretization, numerical integration, and numerical linear algebra. A focus on the engineering and scientific computing environment. Other topics may include waves, advanced numerical methods (like spectral, finite element, finite volume), non-uniform grids, turbulence modeling, and methods complex boundary conditions. (Prerequisite ME 347 or equivalent) Three credits.

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ME 444 Mechanics of Composite Material

While the use of man-made composites have existed for centuries for practical applications, engineered composite materials are finding increasing use in many high technology applications such as aerospace, electronics, sporting goods, and structural components for high stability systems.  This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of classification, processing, properties, selection and failure of polymer, metal and ceramic based composite materials.  (Prerequisite: MF 207) Three credits.

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ME 450 Gas Dynamics

This course reviews fundamental concepts and equations of fluid dynamics. One dimensional compressible flow solutions with and without friction are covered. Equations of conservation of mass, rate of strain tensor, Navier-Stokes equations, mechanical and thermal energy equations with derivations are discussed. Equations are presented in Cartesian and orthogonal curvilinear coordinate systems. Boundary layer theory is covered. Students will discuss laminar and turbulent viscous flow solutions, including boundary layers, Couette, & Poiseuille flows. In addition to analytical closed form solutions, an introduction to computational methods is presented. (Prerequisite: ME 347, or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ME 451 Energy Conversion

This course covers the major topics in energy conversion, including fuels used in energy conversion; solar energy; gas turbine engines and applications; internal combustion engines; heat pumps; classic and novel power and refrigeration cycles; system analysis; system economics; and environmental considerations. The course includes computer simulation of power plant performance to optimize energy conversion efficiency. A research report on one of the emerging sources of energy is an essential part of this course. (Prerequisite: ME 349) Three credits.

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ME 452 Heat and Mass Transfer

This course covers the basic concepts of conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer. Boiling and condensation; design and performance of selected thermal systems (including heat exchangers); laminar and turbulent flows as related to forced and free convection are all studied. Mathematical modeling of engineering systems using modern analytical and computational solution methods are also covered. (Prerequisite: ME 349 or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ME 453  Turbomachinery

Theory and fundamentals of modern turbomachinery for aerospace (helicopter, aircraft) and power generation (marine, industrial) applications. Brayton engine cycle analysis and performance improvement are examined. Applications of the principles of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics to the design of turbines and compressors are discussed; analysis and velocity diagram for axial compressors, centrifugal compressors and axial turbines. Discussion of combustion and environmental emissions is included. (Prerequisite: ME 347 or equivalent) Three credits.

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ME 470 Applications of Finite Element Analysis

This course examines applications of finite element analysis in modern engineering including structural analysis, fluid flow, heat transfer, and dynamics. Finite element formulations covering two and three dimensional elements as well as energy methods are developed. Students develop techniques for application of finite element method in structural design, dynamic system response, fluid and thermal analyses. Application of methodology to fluid flow is presented. Students solve example and design problems manually and using modern finite-element analysis software, ANSYS and FLUENT. (Prerequisites: ME 318 or equivalent.) Three credits.

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ME 495 Independent Study

A well-planned program of individual study under the supervision of the faculty member. Three credits.

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ME 496 Special Projects

An in depth study of selected topics of particular interest to the student and instructor. Three credits.

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ME 550, ME 551 Thesis I, II

The master’s thesis is intended to be a test of the student’s ability to formulate a problem, solve it, and communicate the results. The thesis is supervised on an individual basis by a faculty member. A thesis involves the ability to gather information, examine it critically, think creatively, organize effectively, and write convincingly; it is a project that permits the student to demonstrate skills that are basic to both academic and work in industry. The student must also submit a paper for possible inclusion in a refereed journal appropriate to the topic. Three credits each.

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Graduate Certificate in Automated Manufacturing

Courses DM 405 and DM 430 are described under MOT.

MF 440 Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM)II

The course balances CAD and CAM with up-to-date information on rapid prototyping, solid modeling systems, and Web-related issues. Management of an effective product design from a business perspective is introduced: reducing material, tolling, setup and waste costs. An integration in a factory automation environments is also explored. Mathematical terminology and the concepts are explained in as intuitive a way as possible. The course also covers components of CAD/CAM/CAE Systems and CAD/CAM postprocessor development manufacturing systems. Students are required to have a background in programming, calculus, and matrix and vector algebra. The course consists of lectures, group discussions, case studies, a term project, computer simulation, and laboratory.  Three credits.

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MF 450 Advanced Programmable Logic Control Systems (PLC)

In this course, students are introduced to the design and implementation of programmable logic controllers for use in industry in the areas of automation, manufacturing, and other related uses. Students examine Programmable Logic Controllers while concentrating on relay ladder logic techniques and how the PLC is connected to external components in an operating control system. State-of-the-art software is used, including MultiSim, LabView, Cosivis,Veep, and RS Logix 500. Course covers: input/output ports, continuous process control, timing and counting functions, chaining sequences, and digital gate logic Computer Aided Analysis and Design. Three credits.

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MF 454 Product and Process Design for Manufacturing

Students learn the principles of product design for optimizing product manufacture and assembly - an essential part of the concurrent engineering process. The course examines materials and processes used in part manufacture and designing for manual and automated assembly processes. A course project applies these principles. (Prerequisite: ME 311 or equivalent) Three credits.

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MF 461 Automation and Robotics I

This course introduces the basic elements of automation, industrial robotics, automated work cells, common information model systems, and the automated factory. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, the classification of robots, automation sensors, work cells, import systems and programming, robot/system integration, economic justification, and applications. (Prerequisite: ME 203 or equivalent) Three credits.

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MF 462 Automation and Robotics II

This course introduces components of the automated factory. Topics include design of parts and processes for automation, hard and flexible automation, blocks of automation, automatic production and assembly, numeric controllers, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, industrial logic control systems, programmable logic controllers, and computer applications in automation. (Prerequisite: MF 361 or equivalent) Three credits.

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SW 407 Introduction to Computer Programming

This course is a study of object oriented software component design.  This course introduces object oriented programming and its use in problem solving with abstract data types such as lists, linked lists, stacks, queues, graphs, and trees.  This course serves as one of the bridge courses to the MSSE program.  Three credits.

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SW 480 Health Information Systems

This course introduces the information systems and their applications in healthcare.  The topics include the fundamentals of information systems, medical terminology, electronic health record, health care information regulations and standards, assessing health information systems for managerial and clinical support, project management, information security and Health IT Leadership.  (Prerequisite: SW 131 or permission of the instructor)  Three credits.

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SW 481 Human Computer Interface

This course examines human computer interaction and evaluates various user interfaces, especially as they apply to the healthcare environment.  Topics inlcude data visualization, evidence-based systems and tools (such as PubMed, UpToDate), and data warehouse design with an emphasis on healthcare.  (Prerequisite: SW 480 or permission of the instructor)  Three credits.

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ECE 434 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering

This course is an introduction to the instrumentation methods used to measure, store and analyze the signals produced by biomedical phenomena.  The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the basic design and implementation of techniques for measuring a broad scope of signal types for molecular, cellular and physiological research.  Students will get an introduction to the origins and characteristics of the electric and electromagnetic signals that arise in biological tissues.  Sensors used for acquiring electrical, magnetic, optical/spectral and chemical signals will be covered.  Topics include the underlying physics and chemistry of biomedical signals, biosensor types and usage, amplification and signal conditioning, data acquisition methods, basic signal processing methods, the origins of artifact and noise, and programming methods.  Three credits.

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ME 472 Applications of Theory of Elasticity

This course covers theory of elasticity (stress, strain, and generalized Hooke's law), strain energy methods (Castigliano's theorem), thin shells of revolution (equilibrium equations, pressure vessels), thin plates (rectangular and circular plates, moment-curvature relations), beams of elastic foundations and buckling.  (Prerequisite: ME 308)  Three credits.

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MF 430 Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) I

An in-depth introduction to the science, math and engineering of computer aided manufacturing methods.  The course provides a comprehensive view of manufacturing planning, design, automation, flexible automation, and computers in manufacturing using a strong science-based and analytical approach.  CNC and tooling for CNC application will be discussed.  The course will consist of : lectures, group discussions, case studies, a term project, computer simulation and laboratory. Three credits.

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RD 515 Independent Study

This course is intended to broaden the student's knowledge in a specific area of interest.  Students may pursue topics or projects under the supervision of a faculty member.  Permission of the department is required to enroll in this course.  Three credits

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