2014 Course Catalogs | Undergraduate Catalog 2014-15 | Colleges | The School of Engineering | Course Descriptions 

BEN 300 Biomedical Instrumentation

Instrumentation and techniques used in acquisition, processing, and presentation of biomedical signals: transducers, sensors, Fourier analysis, flow measurement, biosensors, amplifiers, bridge circuits, and measurement of physical parameters and electrophysiological signals.
(Prerequisites: BI107 or BI170 and EE213). Four credits.

BEN 331 Biomedical Signal Processing

This course presents an overview of different methods used in biomedical signal processing. Signals with bioelectric origin are given special attention and their properties and clinical significance are reviewed. In many cases, the methods used for processing and analyzing biomedical signals are derived from a modeling perspective based on statistical signal descriptions. The purpose of the signal processing methods ranges from reduction of noise and artifacts to extraction of clinically significant features. The course gives each participant the opportunity to study the performance of a method on real, biomedical signals. (Prerequisites: SW 131 or CS 142 or SW 408 and MA 146 or MA 122; or permission of the instructor). Three credits.

BEN 332 Biomedical Imaging

The course presents the fundamentals and applications of common medical imaging techniques, for example: x-ray imaging and computed tomography, nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and optical imaging. In addition, as a basis for biomedical imaging, introductory material on general image formation concepts and characteristics are presented, including human visual perception and psychophysics. (Prerequisite CR 331) Three credits.

BEN 333 Biomedical Visualization

This course is an introduction to 3-D biomedical visualization. Various technologies are introduced, including UltraSound, MRI, CAT scans, PET scans, etc. Students will learn about spatial data structures, computational geometry and solid modeling with applications in 3-D molecular and anatomical modeling. (Prerequisite: SW 131 or equivalent) Three credits.

BEN 390/391 Bioengineering Design Project

In this capstone course, students work in teams on advanced projects that emphasize engineering design with due attention to design constraints and engineering standards. The overarching scope of this course is to transform engineering students to practicing engineers. Under the guidance of a faculty instructor and a mentor, each team conducts literature searches, write a technical proposal and its members develop skills in information analysis and synthesis; they model and test prototypes of their devices, and make frequent oral and poster presentations of their work to faculty and peers, and submit timely progress reports. In the process, they receive instruction in effective communication and presentation practices, and develop an appreciation of teamwork and collective success. This two-semester course begins in the fall of the academic year and concludes at the end of the spring term with a final team oral presentation and a final written report, and a working prototype of the team's project. Prerequisite: completion of all non-elective program courses, and completion of other program requirements to enable graduation within the year of completion of BEN 390/391. Total of six credits.

CD 211 Engineering Graphics I

This is a basic course in engineering graphics principles and is taught simultaneously with SolidWorks, a 3D modeling design application. Using traditional and computer design, the course stresses geometric constructions, orthographic projection, dimensioning, sectional views, 3D part modeling, assembly modeling, drafting and engineering drawings, animation and geometric tolerancing. The course stresses aesthetics and technical sketching. You will gain a working knowledge of SolidWorks in engineering design. Three credits

CD 212 Engineering Graphics II

This course introduces CATIA Version 5; the leading CAD/CAM/CAE application used by automotive, aerospace, shipbuilding, and consumer goods industries. It provides mechanical, electrical, automotive, aerospace, and marine engineers and architects with the design tools to take products from concept to completion - in one seamless application. This course covers basic solid modeling concepts of individual sheetmetal and machined parts from detailed drawings. "Complex Shape Modeling" using "wireframe concepts" and "surface-based" modeling is covered. Building of assemblies of components and control of their positioning and orientation, as well as motion simulation is covered. Fully detailed production drawings of components and assemblies are also covered. Three credits.

CR 245 Digital Design I

An introduction to computer hardware design. Topics include: digital design principles, Boolean algebra, combinational logic design, sequential logic design, registers, counters, memory, multiplexers, finite state machines, radix conversion, and programmable logic devices. Students learn to write, implement, and simulate elementary digital design. Three credits.

CR 245L Digital Design I Laboratory

This lab course covers the practical aspects of digital logic design. Students design and implement logic circuits using simulators and hardware and techniques taught in CR 245. Students use state machines to implement open-ended design problems. (Co-requisite: CR 245) One credit.

CR 246 Digital Electronics Design II

This course examines computer architecture implemented using a hardware design language and programmable logic devices. Students design, implement, and program small reduced-instruction-set-computer machines. Students understand central processing unit architecture and the VHDL language and implement and program a central processing unit using VHDL. Student knowledge of the basics culminates in being able to design and implement programmable finite-state machines. (Prerequisite: CR 245) Three credits.

CR 310 Voice and Signal Processing

This course has both signal processing and object-oriented design content. It emphasizes hands-on multi-media programming, offering an overview of digital signal processing and its applications. Students build software systems that make use of sampling theory, Fourier transforms, and processing in both space and time. Students implement algorithms for elementary sound synthesis (Prerequisites: SW 232, and MA 145 or MA 171) Three credits.

CR 311 Image Processing

This course builds on CR 310, extending the multi-media program content into the area of image processing. Students build image-processing applications, implementing algorithms in areas that include color space conversion, low-level pattern recognition, and theory of two-dimensional in space and time. Students write high-performance image-processing programs with applications in the area of streaming multi-media content. (Prerequisite: CR 310 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

CR 320 Computer Networks

This course covers principles of networking and network programming. Topics include OSI layers, elementary queuing theory, protocol analysis, multi-threading, command-line interpreters, and monitors. Students write a distributed computing system and check their performance predictions with experiments. (Prerequisite: SW 131 and MA 351 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

CR 325 Computer Graphics

This course supports the visualization and computer systems domain, offering an introductory treatment to two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer graphics concepts. Students write computer games and employ their knowledge to imbue them with realism. High performance rendering uses the latest in cutting edge hardware-accelerated graphics processors. (Prerequisite: SW 131 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

CR 331 Biomedical Signal Processing

This course presents an overview of different methods used in biomedical signal processing. Signals with bioelectric origin are given special attention and their properties and clinical significance are reviewed. In many cases, the methods used for processing and analyzing biomedical signals are derived from a modeling perspective based on statistical signal descriptions. The purpose of the signal processing methods ranges from reduction of noise and artifacts to extraction of clinically significant features. The course gives each participant the opportunity to study the performance of a method on real, biomedical signals. (Prerequisites: SW 131 or CS 142 or SW 408 and MA 146 or MA 122; or permission of the instructor). Three credits.

CR 332 Biomedical Imaging

The course presents the fundamentals and applications of common medical imaging techniques, for example: x-ray imaging and computed tomography, nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and optical imaging. In addition, as a basis for biomedical imaging, introductory material on general image formation concepts and characteristics are presented, including human visual perception and psychophysics. (Prerequisite CR 331) Three credits.

CR 333 Biomedical Visualization

This course is an introduction to 3-D biomedical visualization. Various technologies are introduced, including UltraSound, MRI, CAT scans, PET scans, etc. Students will learn about spatial data structures, computational geometry and solid modeling with applications in 3-D molecular and anatomical modeling. (Prerequisite: SW 131 or equivalent) Three credit.

CR 346 Computer System Architecture

This course introduces the machine language and various components of a computer hardware in modern computer systems. The course focuses on CPU, memory, bus, cache, I/O module, internal data representation, and instruction set design. It also covers pipelining, superscalar architecture, reduced instruction set computers, parallel architectures, and interconnection networks. (Prerequisite: CR 245) Three credits.

CR 382 Independent Studies in Computer Engineering

This course includes supervised reading and research. Available only by pre-arrangement with the instructor. Three credits.

EG 31 Fundamentals of Engineering

This course provides core engineering knowledge and competencies in a highly interactive class format. Topics include professional skills such as technical writing and presentation, guidelines for professional engineering practice, and career preparation. Introduction to the fields, roles, and industries of engineering also serves as a basis for selection of engineering major field. Hands-on team projects are core learning experiences. They form a structured introduction to the implementation of principles of design and engineering methodologies, system engineering management, and presentation skills. Guest presenters and field trips augment this course, which is taught by interdisciplinary faculty teams. (Co-requisites: PS 15) Three credits

EG 145 Mathematical Analysis

In this course students will learn mathematical and numerical methods such as differentiation, integration, and Fourier analysis  and how to apply these methods to solve scientific problems. Additionally, the course will cover statistics including data analysis, trend fitting, datacorrelation, and interpolation. Students will learn to use MATLAB as a tool but also become proficient in programming. (Prerequisites: MA 145 or equivalent; Co-requisite: MA 146) Three credits.

EG 210 Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology I

This course will provide a highly interdisciplinary introduction to the science of nanoscale materials (nanoscience). The course will survey the new field of nanoscience/nanotechnology, aiming to motivate interest in and heighten awareness of this field. Its many potential applications in medicine, biology, electronics and optoelectronics, engineering, materials science and chemistry, open a broad new horizon to an exciting technology to serve societal needs. Topics will include historical background, characterization techniques, physics and chemistry of nanoscale materials, fabrication techniques, characterization methods, nanoscale applications (nanotechnology), and ethical/societal considerations. Intended for all students. Three credits.

EG 212 Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology II

This course will continue a highly interdisciplinary, mathematically-based overview, providing a solid foundation in nanoscale materials, techniques, and applications (nanoscience). The course will continue to broadly survey the new field of nanoscience/nanotechnology. Its many potential applications in medicine, biology, electronics and optoelectronics, engineering, materials science, and chemistry, open a broad new horizon to an exciting technology to serve societal needs. Topics of discussion, such as quantum dots, nanowires, nanotubes, MEMS and nanobiology, will be reinforced through hands on laboratory experience with nanomaterial synthesis, device fabrication techniques, and characterization methods. Intended for students interested in the minor in nanotechnology. (Prerequisite: EG 210) Lecture with Lab course. Four credits.

EG 325 Engineering Applications of Numerical Methods

Topics include root-finding, interpolation, linear algebraic systems, numerical integration, numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, modeling, simulation, initial boundary value problems, and two point boundary value problems. (Prerequisite: SW 131 or equivalent demonstrated programming language skills) Three credits.

EG 390-391 Senior Design I & II

In this capstone course, students work in teams on advanced projects that emphasize engineering design with due attention to design constraints and engineering standards.  The overarching scope of this course is to transform engineering students to practicing engineers.  Under the guidance of a faculty instructor and a mentor, each team conducts literature searches, write a technical proposal and its members develop skills in information analysis and synthesis; they model and test prototypes of their devices, and make frequent oral and poster presentations of their work to faculty and peers, and submit timely progress reports.  In the process, they receive instruction in effective communication and presentation practices, and develop an appreciation of teamwork and collective success.  This two-semester course begins in the fall of the academic year and concludes at the end of the spring term with a final team oral presentation and a final written report, and a working prototype of the team's project.  Prerequisite: completion of all non-elective program courses, and completion of other program requirements to enable graduation within the year of completion of EG 390-391.  Total of six credits.

EE 213 Introduction to Electric Circuits

This course introduces engineering students to the analysis of linear electric circuits. The course covers the basic laws of circuit behavior and analysis techniques, including descriptions of circuit elements and electronic variables, and considers circuit theorems and principles for insightful analysis of electrical circuits. The course introduces basic concepts and analysis of networks. (Prerequisites: MA 146, PS 16, PS 16L) Three credits.

EE 213L Electric Circuits Lab

Students use common electrical laboratory instruments (oscilloscopes, meters, and signal generators) and elemental circuit components to construct and analyze basic electrical circuits. They study the application of circuit theorems and circuit elements (RL and RC); conduct experiments with transient, steady state, and frequency response; and use software applications to simulate and analyze circuit performance. (Co-requisite: EE 213) One credit.

EE 221 Frequency Domain Circuit Analysis

Students perform frequency domain analysis of passive and active circuits, study transient and AC circuit analysis manually and with computer-aided applications, and examine the transient response of first and second order circuits. The course introduces pole and zero concepts and applies them to circuit analysis, and introduces computer methods of circuit analysis and design. (Prerequisites: MA 245, EE 213) Three credits.

EE 231 Introduction to Electronics Circuits and Devices

This first course in electronics teaches basic principles and technologies to understand, analyze, and design electronic circuits. The course reviews the properties of semiconductor materials used in the fabrication of diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field effect transistors. Students analyze amplifier biasing techniques and develop circuit models of semi-conductor devices that are used to analyze and design electronic circuits. Computer simulations of circuits are used to illustrate the fundamental principles. (Prerequisite: EE 213) Three credits.

EE 231L Electronics Circuits Lab

Students build and test circuits using diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and MOSFETs. They use the principles developed in EE 231 to analyze, build, and test amplifier and oscillator circuits. (Prerequisite: EE 213L; Co-requisite: EE 231) One credit.

EE 301 Signals and Systems I

This course studies and classifies continuous and discrete signals and systems. It presents time domain and discrete analysis of signals using the Fourier series, Laplace transforms, Fourier transforms, z-transforms, and fast Fourier transforms (e.g., differential equations, convolution, concept and meaning of impulse response); and examines frequency domain analysis, the Fourier series, and the Fourier transform as an alternative to time domain analysis. Students gain further insights into signal and system properties through the Laplace transform methods and the concept of the transfer function. (Prerequisite: EE 221; Co-requisite: MA 321) Three credits.

EE 315 Nanoelectronics I

Building on the two introductory courses in nanotechnology, this course is the first of two that describe how nanotechnology can be integrated into the electronics industry. The unique electrical, mechanical, and optical properties of structures in the nanometer range and how they may be applied to electronics products are discussed. Principles of electronic materials, semiconductor devices, and microfabrication techniques will be extended to the nanoscale. Students will increase their knowledge of electronic structure, quantum mechanics, and the behavior of optoelectronic and low-dimensional systems. Students make extensive use of the available literature to seek out potential applications of nanotechnology. Intended for students interested in the minor in nanotechnology - Nanoelectronics track. Also open to interested graduate students in ECE. Lecture course. (Prerequisite: EG 212 or permission of the instructor). Three credits.

EE 316 Nanoelectronics II

This second course in Nanoelectronics emphasizes present and potential applications of nanotechnology in the various fields of next-generation electronics. The course will discuss topics relevant to electromagnetism at the nanoscale, MEMS/NEMS, nanosensors, nano-optics, molecular electronics, and nanoelectronic interfaces with biology. Student teams will survey the available literature and companies involved in designing and manufacturing devices with Nanoelectronics as a core to select a product for analysis in terms of technical and economic advantages, and present their findings. Teams of students also conceptualize a potential product, and perform the same analysis. Intended for students interested in the minor in nanotechnology - Nanoelectronics track. Also open to interested graduate students in ECE. Prerequisite: ECE 315. Three credits.

EE 321 Electromagnetic Fields

This course uses vector calculus to investigate electric and magnetic fields. Topics include techniques for the computation of fields for given charge distributions; Coulomb's and Gauss' law and applications, and the significance of Poisson's and Laplace equations; solution methods; moving charges and corresponding electric and magnetic forces; electric and magnetic fields in mattes; methods of solving boundary value problems; Maxwell's equations in integral and differential form; and electromagnetic radiation and wave propagation. (Prerequisites: EE 301 or CR 310, MA245 and MA 321) Four credits.

EE 331 Analog Electronics Design

This advanced course in electronics examines high frequency response of bipolar junction transistor and field-effect transistor amplifiers using hybrid two-port active device models. Students consider the effect of feedback and frequency compensation techniques on the amplifier response and study a variety of analog circuits with respect to their analysis and applications, including active filters, oscillators, waveform generation and shaping, voltage regulator, and communication circuits. The course introduces basic power electronics device components. (Prerequisites: EE 221, EE 231) Three credits.

EE 331L Analog Electronics Lab

This advanced lab provides insight into the functions of various application-specific electronic circuits. Experiments characterize functioning of various analog systems, such as oscillators, active filters, waveform generation and shaping circuits, and voltage regulator circuits. (Prerequisite: EE 231L; Co-requisite: EE 331) One credit.

EE 335 Microelectronics

This course covers three methods of fabricating high-density interconnection structures for manufacturing microelectronic assemblies: thick films, thin films, and printed circuit boards. The thick and thin film technologies use substrates of metalized ceramic to make the interconnections between components and are capable of fabricating integrated resistors with high precision and stability. The printed circuit board technology uses organic materials with copper laminates to etch the interconnection patterns. The individual layers are laminated to produce the multilayer structure, but do not include integrated resistors. Each of the technologies is examined to determine the electrical and physical properties of the structures. Such parameters as distributed capacitance and how they affect circuit performance are discussed. In the laboratory accompanying the course, students have the opportunity to fabricate thick and thin film circuits and to examine the structure of printed circuit boards. (Prerequisite: EE 331) Three credits.

EE 346 Embedded Microcontrollers

This course covers the architecture of microcontrollers, including how they are constructed internally and how they interface with external circuitry. Applications for microcontrollers in both complex and simple equipment are discussed. Students learn how to apply and how to select a microcontroller for a given application. An accompanying laboratory course covers the programming of microprocessors to do a specific task. This course covers the programming and application of the PIC microcontroller. Students are able to develop programming skills using assembly language and software tools such as MPLAB IDE and MultiSim MCU. These tools are used to develop software code for practical applications such as motor speed control and voltage regulation for power supplies. (Prerequisite: CR 245 or equivalent) Three credits.

EE 346L Microcontroller Laboratory

This laboratory covers the basic operation and applications of a microcontroller. Students learn to program a microcontroller to control applications, such as motor speed, by the use of an emulator connected to a PC. They design a circuit using a microcontroller for a specific application and write a program to control the circuit. On completion of the program, they use the emulator to program an actual microcontroller for use in their circuits. (Co-requisite: EE 346) One credit.

EE 350 Analog Communication Systems

The course focuses on analog communication systems and the effects of noise on those systems, developing modulation and demodulation techniques (amplitude, frequency, and phase modulation and pulse code). It discusses dealing with non-linear system elements and presents a mathematical treatment of the effects of various noise sources on these systems. Historical design studies and topics in communication applications permit students to apply these concepts to meet system requirements. The course clarifies important concepts through simulation of modulation techniques on multimedia computing systems. (Prerequisite: EE 301) Three credits.

EE 352 Digital Communications

This course is designed to explore current digital communications features, including network communications between computers. It includes discrete time signals and systems, Z-transforms, discrete Fourier transforms, fast Fourier transforms, digital filter design, and random signals. Fundamentals of sampling principles and channel coding are utilized to develop common baseband and digital modulation techniques (ASK, FSK, PSK, PCM, and delta modulation). Transmission over bandwidth constrained channels, and signal detection and extraction. Multiplexing and multiple access networks are also analyzed. The lecture material is illustrated with practical examples. (Prerequisite: EE 301 or equivalent.) Three credits.

EE 360 Power Electronics

This course covers the design and operation of power electronics circuits, such as power supplies and motor controls. Using electronic circuit models for transistors and diodes developed in earlier courses, students analyze and design power circuits. Particular attention is paid to power dissipation and packaging. The accompanying laboratory course, ECE 360L, provides practical experience in conjunction with the lecture material. (Prerequisites: EE 301, EE 221) Three credits.

EE 360L Power Electronics Laboratory

This lab applies the theory developed in EE 360 to actual devices. Students fabricate, test, and optimize their designs. They gain practical experience in packaging and cooling power circuits. One credit.

EE 361 Green Power Generation

This course compares various methods of green power generation including solar power, wind power, water power, and several others. This course covers how power is generated from these sources, the startup costs, the efficiency, and the practicality. These methods are compared to the present most common method of using oil and gas to heat water into steam to turn turbines. The student does not necessarily need a background in engineering and any necessary background material will be covered to the understanding of all. Three credits.

EE 375 Microwave Structures

This course considers the generation and transmission of electromagnetic waves. Maxwell's equations and the generation of radiation by currents and charges in free space are covered, followed by the propagation of waves in various media. Structures used in microwave propagation, including transmission lines, waveguides, resonators, amplifiers, and antennas are also considered. (Prerequisite: EE 321) Three credits.

EE 377 Power Security and Reliability

This course focusses on Power System Protection and Relaying to allow the design of robust and reliable power systems.  After reviewing the need for protection of power system elements (motors, generators, transformers, and transmission/distribution lines), the course:  Explores developments in the creation of smarter, more flexible protective systems based on advances in the computational power of digital devices and the capabilities of communication systems that can be applied within the power grid, Examines the regulations related to power system protection and how they impact the way protective relaying systems are designed, applied, set, and monitored,            Considers the evaluation of protective systems during system disturbances and describes the tools available for analysis. Addresses the benefits and problems associated with applying microprocessor-based devices in protection schemes.  Contains an expanded discussion of internal protection requirements at dispersed generation facilities.  MatLab is used to solve homework problems and do team design projects.  (Prerequisite: EE385)  Three credits 

 

EE 379 Communication Systems

The course covers analog and digital communication systems and the effects of noise on those systems, modulation and demodulation techniques (amplitude, frequency, and phase modulation as well as ASK, FSK, PSK, PCM, and delta modulation). It discusses dealing with non-linear system elements and presents a mathematical treatment of the effects of various noise sources on these systems. Historical design studies and topics in communication applications permit students to apply these concepts to meet system requirements. The course clarifies important concepts through simulation of modulation techniques on multimedia computing systems. Multiplexing and multiple access networks are also analyzed.  MatLab is used to solve homework problems and do a team design project.  (Prerequisite: EE301)  Three credits    

EE 382 Advanced Electrical Project

During this design course emphasizing individual creativity, students (working with a faculty mentor) develop project objectives and performance specifications. At review meetings, students present progress on their project, including analytic and experimental results to date. A final report and presentation demonstrates the accomplishments and significant conclusions. Faculty involvement creates a realistic engineering development environment. Students may take this course as independent study once the prerequisites have been met. (Prerequisites: departmental approval of project proposal following completion of non-elective electrical engineering courses and at least one major elective) Two credits.

EE 383 Wireless Systems I

This course covers several aspects of wireless communication, including antenna design, FCC regulations, and multi-channel transmission protocols. Modern design approaches, such as Bluetooth, are discussed, along with wide-area network systems (WANS) and local broadband networks. (Prerequisites: EE 321, EE 213) Three credits.

EE 385 Power Generation and Distribution

This course considers the generation and distribution of electrical power to large areas. Three-phase networks are described in detail, including both generators and loads. Methods of modeling distribution systems by per-unit parameters are covered, along with power factor correction methods. Fault detection and lightning protection methods are also described. Some economic aspects of power generation and distribution are presented. (Prerequisite: EE 221) Three credits.

EE 386 Fault Analysis in Power Systems

This course covers three types of faults in electrical power grids: open lines, lines shorted to ground, and lines shorted to each other. Methods of locating faults are covered along with an analysis of the effects of such faults. Methods of protection and fault isolation are also covered. (Prerequisite: EE 385) Three credits.

MC 290 Engineering Systems Dynamics

The student will become familiar with the analysis of the dynamic response of structures, structural components to transient loads, and foundation excitation.  Course includes single-degree-of-freedom and multiple-degree-of-freedom systems, frequency response concepts, and introduction to modal analysis.  Basic concepts of vibration control and control theory will be introduced.   (Prerequisites: MA 321, ME 318) Three credits.

MC 300 Feedback and Control Systems

This course emphasizes analysis and synthesis of closed loop control systems using both classical and state-space approaches with an emphasis on electro-mechanical systems. The mathematical requirements include the Laplace transform methods of solving differential equations, matrix algebra, and basic complex variables. The discussion of classical control system design includes the modeling of dynamic systems, block diagram representation, time and frequency domain methods, transient and steady state response, stability criteria, controller action [Proportional (P), proportional and integral (PI), Proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) and pseudo-derivatives feedback], root locus methods, the methods of Nyquist and Bode, and dynamics compensation techniques.  The discussion of state-space methods includes formulation and solution (analytical and computer-based) of the state equations and pole-placement design. The course integrates the use of computer-aided analysis and design tools (MATLAB) so as to ensure relevance to the design of real  world controlled electro-mechanical systems using case studies and applications to electrical and mechanical systems. Includes lab (hardware-based) exercises. (Prerequisites: MA 321, MC 290 or EE 301) Three credits.

MC 396 Mechatronics Application

This course covers development of mechatronics theory and applications to systems dependent upon the integration of mechanical, electrical and computer engineering.  Students assemble hardware components to create a product design that fulfills a specified task in a mechatronics system.  Students develop design skills in mechanisms, electrical devices, and software to create, test, and verify system function.  Sessions include lab projects.  Three credits.

ME 201 Engineering Statics

This introduction to rigid body mechanics using vector representation covers free body diagrams and static equilibrium in two- and three-dimensional space; solves problems in trusses, frames, and simple mechanisms; and develops methods in problem-solving techniques using computer-based approaches. Students perform lab experiments to support lecture theories and prepare professional-level reports. (Prerequisites: PS 15, PS 15L, MA 146) Three credits.

ME 203 Kinematics and Dynamics

This course presents kinematics principles applied to particles and rigid body elements. Topics include analysis of forces and motion using Newton's second and third laws of motion; theory of kinetics of particles and rigid body elements under rectilinear and curvilinear motion, vector methods; principles of work, energy, and power; and momentum and impact.  (Prerequisites: ME 201, MA 245) Three credits.

ME 206L Mechanics Laboratory

Students do mechanics experiments for two- and three-dimensional structures under static loading conditions. Concepts include vectors, equilibrium, moments, truss analysis, forces, and center of gravity of objects. This course includes topics in engineering materials, such as hardness, toughness, microscopic analysis, machinability and thermal properties. The course introduces strain gages, instrumentation and statistical data analysis. Students perform experiments and prepare laboratory reports. (Co-requisites: ME 201) One credit.

ME 241 Principles of Thermodynamics

This course on macroscopic thermodynamics with applications covers conservation of energy for open and closed systems; equations of state and pure substances; first and second law of thermodynamics, including the concepts of internal energy; and enthalpy and entropy as applied to aero-thermal components. Tables of thermodynamic properties, ideal gases and elements of cycle analysis, and applications of thermodynamic cycles, such as Carnot and Rankine, are discussed. (Prerequisites: PS 15, PS 15L; MA 245) Three credits.

ME 307L Dynamics Systems Lab

Students perform experiments covering the concepts of kinematics, dynamics, and mechanisms. Concepts included are: Newton's Laws, momentum, mechanical energy, impact, and friction. The course includes concepts in the area of strength of materials, such as: stress, strain, loading, modulus of elasticity, and fatigue. It also covers analysis of beams, photoelastic studies, and statistical data analysis. Students complete written lab reports. (Co-requisites: ME 203, ME 308) One credit.

ME 308 Strength of Materials

This course examines concepts of two-dimensional stress and strain, factors of safety, thermal strain, static indeterminacy, stress concentration, bending including normal and shearing stresses, torsion, direct shear, principal stresses; Mohr's Circle; thin-walled pressure vessels; beam theory including shear and bending moment diagrams; deflection; elastic curves; indeterminate beams; energy methods; the use of superposition; and impact effects and column theory. Lab experiments reinforce these aspects of theory. This course includes a design project. (Prerequisites: ME 201, MA 245; co-requisite: ME 203) Three credits.

ME 311 Machine Design

This course applies the fundamentals of mechanical engineering design to analyze, design, and/or select components typically used in the design of complete mechanical systems. The course covers the design process and analysis of stress and deflection; material properties and loading (steady state and variable) as they relate to failure prevention; and the procedures for design and analysis of common machine elements such as columns, cylinders, fasteners and springs. In team reverse-engineering projects, students apply the course topics to real hardware. The course emphasizes computer techniques and responsible design (safety factors and ethics). (Prerequisite: ME 308) Three credits.

ME 312 Advanced Machine Design

The advanced study of mechanical designs emphasize the process of developing creative solutions through conceptual analysis and synthesis in this course that covers topics related to the design of rotating mechanical systems, welded joint design, and fracture mechanics. Students conduct a research project, investigating and reporting on a topic in advanced design, and compete as part of a team in a design development project that applies structured design practices to real hardware. The course emphasizes concept generation and development and responsible design. (Prerequisite: ME 311) Three credits.

ME 318 Finite Element Analysis

An introduction to concepts in finite element analysis; this course covers one- and two- dimensional element formulation and structural analysis. This finite element analysis is extended to three dimensional problems in dynamic systems and control, design and manufacturing, mechanics and materials, and fluids and thermal systems. This course will provide an overview of the complimentary topic of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Students solve problems both manually and with the use of modern computer finite element software, ANSYS and FLUENT. (Prerequisites: MA 321, CD 211, and ME 308) Three credits.

ME 319 Applications of Finite Element Analysis

This course examines applications of finite element analysis in modern engineering including structural analysis, fluid flow and heat transfer. It is an introduction to the concepts of dynamics as applied to structure. Finite element formulations covering 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional elements as well as energy methods are developed. Students develop techniques for application of finite element method in structural design, dynamic system response, fluid and thermal analyses. Application of methodology to fluid flow is presented. Students solve example and design problems manually and using modern finite element analysis software, ANSYS and FLUENT. (Prerequisites: ME 318) Three credits.

ME 321 Advanced Kinematics

Topics in advanced kinematics include introduction to basic concepts and definitions related to kinematics, commonly used links and joints, kinematic analysis of mechanisms, introduction to robotic mechanisms, homogeneous transformations, Euler angles, Denavit-Hartenberg representation of forward kinematics of robots, inverse kinematics solution of robots, degeneracy and dexterity, and differential motion and velocity relations.  Industrial application of kinematics will also be covered and the course will include a laboratory or project component. (Prerequisite: ME 203) Three credits.

ME 322 Advanced Dynamics

The topics in the area of dynamics include degrees of freedom, generalized coordinates, constraints, the principle of virtual work and D'Alembert's principle. Energy and momentum, frames of reference, orbital motion, moments and products of inertia and dynamics of rigid bodies are also discussed. The course will focus on practical applications of advanced dynamics, including linkages, cams, and kinematic mechanisms, as well as computer applications and project design. (Prerequisites: ME 203 or equivalent) Three credits.

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ME 327 Applications of Fracture Mechanics in Engineering Design

This course covers fracture mechanics concepts for design, materials selection, and failure analysis. The fundamental principles of fracture parameters and criteria, stress field at the tip of a crack, fracture toughness, thickness effect, plastic zone concept, and crack growth under cyclic loading and aggressive environment will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the practical applications of fracture mechanics by incorporation of a failure investigation study where the students utilize the skills developed with the course to root cause a real world failure. Taking a holistic approach each student will have their own case study and learn to incorporate fracture mechanics, material science, mechanics of materials, computer simulation and manufacturing techniques and knowledge into their project. (Prerequisite: ME 308, or equivalent) Three credits.

ME 330 Mechanics of Composite Materials

While the use of man-made composites have existed for centuries for practical applications, engineered composite materials are finding increasing use in many high technology applications such as aerospace, electronics, sporting goods, and structural components for high stability systems.  This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of classification, processing, properties, selection and failure of polymer, metal and ceramic based composite materials. (Prerequisite: MF 207) Three credits.

ME 342 Applications of Thermodynamics

This course applies concepts learned in ME 241. Topics include mixtures of ideal gases and vapors; psychrometry; combustion analysis of common power generating, refrigeration, and air conditioning cycles; figures of merit including thermal efficiency; continuity equation, basic energy relations for turbomachinery; fundamentals of compressor and turbine design; and application and synthesis of design using thermodynamic principles. This course contains a lab segment. (Prerequisites: ME 241) Three credits.

ME 346 Energy Conversion

This course covers the major topics in energy conversion, including fuels used in energy conversion; solar energy; gas turbine engines and applications; internal combustion engines; heat pumps; classic and novel power and refrigeration cycles; system analysis; system economics; and environmental considerations. The course includes computer simulation of power plant performance to optimize energy conversion efficiency.  A research report on one of the emerging sources of energy is an essential part of this course. (Prerequisite: ME 349) Three credits

ME 347 Fluid Mechanics

Topics in this course include incompressible fluids at rest and in motion; Bernoulli's theorem and the principle of similarity flow through orifices, nozzles, and pipes; flow through open channels; energy relationships as applied to pipe lines, pumps, and turbines; acceleration of fluid masses; losses in fluid flow systems; fluid dynamics; the momentum theorem in turbomachinery; and introduction to compressible fluid flow. This course emphasizes design solutions using computer analysis and synthesis. The course includes a design project of a system that applies the principles of fluid flow. (Prerequisite: ME 241) Three credits.

ME 348L Thermal and Fluids Lab

This laboratory learning experience provides the opportunity to explore various components, such as the compressor, condenser, and evaporator, in a series of experiments using refrigeration equipment. Students investigate lift and drag in a wind tunnel, pressure losses in duct flow, and the Bernoulli principle. Also, students determine the efficiency of a centrifugal pump, plot PV diagrams for the Otto Cycle, and study a Pelton Wheel Hydraulic Turbine. The course emphasizes statistical analysis, test planning, data evaluation, and report writing. (Co-requisites: ME 342, ME 347) One credit.

ME 349 Heat Transfer

This course covers one- and two-dimensional heat conduction, including solutions for finned surfaces and solutions for transient problems; convection heat transfer in laminar and turbulent flows; fundamental radiation concepts; laws of thermal radiation; radiation exchange geometrical factors and network methods; heat exchangers and electrical analogies. The course emphasizes design solutions using computer analysis and synthesis. In the lab, students investigate heat transfer in plane surfaces, enhanced heat transfer in extended surfaces, and heat exchanger effectiveness. This course includes a practical design project of a system that applies the principles of heat transfer. (Prerequisites: ME 342, ME 347) Three credits.

ME 350L Energy Transfer Lab

A laboratory experience for engineering students utilizing hands-on experiments to explore energy transfer methods related to transmitted forces in vibrating systems, as well as thermal transfer gradients in mechanical, electrical, and electronic systems. Students use simulation and modeling software for many experiments, including conduction and convection heat transfer processes. The course emphasizes statistical analysis, instrumentation, and report writing. (Co-requisites: MC 290, ME 349) One credit.

ME 351 Gas Dynamics

This course reviews fundamental concepts and equations of fluid dynamics.  One dimensional compressible flow solutions with and without friction are covered.  Equations of conservation of mass, rate of strain tensor, Navier-Stokes equations, mechanical and thermal energy equations with derivations are discussed.  Equations are presented in Cartesian and orthogonal curvilinear coordinate systems.  Boundary layer theory is covered.  Students will discuss laminar and turbulent viscous flow solutions, including boundary layers, Couette, & Poiseuille flows.  In addition to analytical closed form solutions, an introduction to computational methods is presented. (Prerequisite ME 347 or equivalent) Three credits

ME 353 Computational Fluid Dynamics

Introduction to computational methods used for the solution of advanced fluid dynamics problems. Emphasis on concepts in finite difference methods as applied to various ordinary and partial differential model equations in fluid mechanics, fundamentals of spatial discretization, numerical integration, and numerical linear algebra. A focus on the engineering and scientific computing environment. Other topics may include waves, advanced numerical methods (like spectral, finite element, finite volume), non-uniform grids, turbulence modeling, and methods complex boundary conditions. (Prerequisite ME 347 or equivalent) Three credits

ME 354 Heat and Mass Transfer

This course covers the concepts of conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer as well as mass transfer. Boiling and condensation; design and performance of selected thermal systems (including heat exchangers); and laminar and turbulent flows as related to forced and free convection are all studied. Mathematical modeling of engineering systems using modern analytical and computational solution methods are also covered. (Prerequisite: ME 349 or equivalent) Three credits.

ME 362 Turbomachinery

The theoretical basis and the fundamentals of modern turbomachinery for aerospace (helicopter, aircraft) and power generation (marine, industrial) applications are studied. Brayton engine cycle analysis and performance improvement are reviewed. Applications of the principles of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics to the design of turbines and compressors are examined, as well as component analysis and velocity diagram for axial compressors, centrifugal compressors and axial turbines. Discussion of combustion and environmental emissions. This course carries a design/research project (Prerequisite: ME 347 or equivalent) Three credits.

ME 372 Application of Theory of Elasticity

This course covers theory of elasticity (stress, strain, and generalized Hooke's law), strain energy methods (Castigliano's theorem), thin shells of revolution (equilibrium equations, pressure vessels), thin plates (rectangular and circular plates, moment-curvature relations), beams of elastic foundations and buckling.  (Prerequisite: ME 308)  Three credits

ME 382 Independent Study, Advanced Mechanical Project

During this design course emphasizing individual creativity, students (working with a faculty mentor) develop project objectives and performance specifications. At review meetings, students present progress on the project including analytic and experimental results to date. A final report and presentation demonstrates the accomplishments and significant conclusions. Faculty involvement creates a realistic engineering development environment. Students may take this course as independent study once the prerequisites have been met. (Prerequisites: departmental approval of project proposal following completion of non-elective mechanical engineering courses and at least one major elective) One to three credits.

MF 207 Materials Science

This course provides an overview of the various classes of materials including metals, ceramics, and polymers and the role of these materials in service and design applications. Subjects include atomic structure and bonding, the periodic table, crystal structure, microstructure, defects, diffusion, binary phase diagrams, phase transformations, and corrosion. The effects of processing, microstructure, and composition on mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties are discussed. Lab sessions examine mechanical testing methods and microstructure analyses. Students learn sample preparation and metallographic techniques. (Co-requisites: CH 111, CH 111L) Three credits.

MF 230 Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) I

An in-depth introduction to the science, math, and engineering of computer-aided manufacturing methods, the course provides a comprehensive view of manu-facturing planning, design, automation, flexible auto-mation, and computers in manufacturing, using a strong science-based and analytical approach. CNC and tooling for CNC application are discussed. The course consists of lectures, group discussions, case studies, a term project, computer simulation, and laboratory. (Prerequisites: CD 211, MA 146) Three credits.

MF 240 Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) II

The course balances CAD and CAM with up-to-date information on rapid prototyping, solid modeling systems, and Web-related issues. Complicated mathematical terminology is kept to a minimum; instead, the concepts are explained in as intuitive a way as possible. Students are required to have a background only in programming, calculus, and matrix and vector algebra. The course also covers components of CAD/CAM/CAE Systems and CAD/CAM postprocessor development manufacturing systems. The course consists of lectures, group discussions, case studies, a term project, computer simulation, and laboratory. (Prerequisite: MF 230) Three credits.

MF 250 Programmable Logic Control (PLC) Systems

This course introduces the design and implementation of programmable logic controllers for use in industry in the areas of automation, manufacturing, and other related applications. It takes an overall look at Programmable Logic Controllers while concentrating on relay ladder logic techniques and how the PLC is connected to external components in an operating control system. State-of-the-art software used includes: MultiSim, LabView, Cosivis, Veep, and RS Logix 500. The course also covers input/output ports, continuous process control, timing and counting functions, chaining sequences, and digital gate logic. The course consists of lectures, group discussions, case studies, a term project, computer simulation, and laboratory. (Prerequisite: PS 16) Three credits.

MF 250L Programmable Logic Control (PLC) Systems Lab

This course is designed to teach the students to work with the PLC. The student learns to analyze open- and closed-loop control tasks from the field of activities, and to develop structured and PLC-adequate programs in either function plan, ladder diagram, instruction list, sequential function chart, or structured text. Allen Bradley, Mitsubishi, GE, Fanuc, and Siemens PLC are used. The students must create the PLC programs from description of desired operations. State-of-the-art software used includes: MultiSim, LabView, Cosivis, Veep, and RS Logix 500, Fluid Sym P, and others. (Co-requisite: MF 250) One credit.

MF 261 Automation Logic Design

This course introduces binary numbers, Boolean algebra and Karnaugh maps; how these support the design of digital logic and how this platform transfers to ladder logic; both of which are used in the design and control of automation systems. Use of classic methods of using binary logic levels to control a process is applied and the development of Boolean algebra for the solution of automation problems (Prerequisite: PS 16) Three credits.

MC 305 Design of Mechatronics Systems

This course covers development of mechatronics theory and applications to systems dependent upon the integration of mechanical, electrical and computer engineering. Students assemble hardware components to create a product design that fulfills a specified task in a mechatronics system. Students develop design skills in mechanisms, electrical devices, and software to create, test, and verify system function. Sessions include lab projects. Prerequisite: Senior level standing. Three credits.

 

MF 315 Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM)

This course shows how CIM fits into the current manufacturing systems and how the technology is used to solve real-world industrial problems. It integrates basic product design techniques and manufacturing fundamentals and principles, along with a look at the changing operations and information systems that support CIM in the enterprise. Topics include concepts of CIM and the manufacturing enterprise; the design elements and production engineering; managing the enterprise resources; and enabling processes and systems for modern manufacturing. The course consists of lectures, group discussions, case studies, a term project, computer simulation, and laboratory. (Prerequisite: MF 240) Three credits.

MF 316 Automation Instrumentation and Measurement

This course is designed to provide theoretical and practical knowledge in the selection, application, installation and use of instrumentation in automation processes. Students learn about the theory and application of measuring properties such as pressure, temperature, flow, level, vibration, load and strain. Also, topics such as calibration, sensors, gauges and computer applications are included. Introduction to LabView and other data acquisition software is part of the curriculum. (Prerequisite: PS 16) Three credits.

MF 317 Automation Process Design

This course will discuss the criteria for automating manual operations. The intent is to call attention to some of the important considerations which must be given to processes employed using automation principles. Areas of concentration are Transportation, Utilities, Defense, Facility Operations and Home Automation. Information Technology (IT) encompasses a broad spectrum of computer technologies used to create, store, retrieve and disseminate information. It is in the area of IT where most of the more flexible and non-industry-specific advances are now being made. Manufacturing applications also will be discussed, including Flexible Manufacturing Systems (FMS), Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM), Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM), Numerically Controlled (NC) equipment. The course will distinguish which processes adapt the specific automation category. Programmable automation and artificial intelligence will be discussed. (Prerequisite: MF 240) Three credits.

MF 318 Applications of Hydraulics and Pneumatics in Automation

This course introduces the integration of fluids and mechanics theory to real-world applications. The primary topics include piping, hydraulic fluids, pumps, diverting valves, actuators, ISO symbols and system design with safety as a priority. Upon completion, students will have an understanding of how fluid power is applied in automation and developed to satisfy industrial requirements. The course consists of lectures, group discussions, case studies, a term project, computer simulation and laboratory. (Prerequisite: PS 16) Three credits.

MF 319 Network Systems Automation

This course will discuss the networks used in automation, principles of operation, and use of them. Students will be exposed to the five level of automation from device level to enterprise level; fieldbus and profibus; networks detecting machinery faults; networked smart sensors systems; and the peer-to-peer intelligent transducer networks. The course will also introduce students to local area networks and data communication. The course consists of lectures, group discussions, case studies, a term project, computer simulation, and laboratory. (Prerequisite: MF 240) Three credits.

MF 350 Advanced Programmable Logic Control (PLC) Systems

This course will give students advanced concepts in programmable logic controllers and their applications and interfacing to industrial controls in the areas of automation, manufacturing, and others. Topics include bit operations, data manipulation, industrial PLC network utilizing Ethernet, ControlNet, and DeviceNet. Data sharing and distributed PLC programming techniques along with fundamentals of touch panel programming and operation are studied. State of the art software used: MultiSim, LabView, Cosivis, Veep, Automation Studio, and RS Logix 500. It will include also: input/output ports, intermittent and continuous process control, arithmetic and comparison instruction, function block diagrams, indirect and indexed addressing, and sequential function charts. The course will consist of: lectures, group discussions, case studies, a term project, and computer simulation. (Prerequisite: PS 16) Three credits.

MF 350L Advanced Programmable Logic Control (PLC) Systems Lab

This course will introduce the advance design and implementation of programmable logic controllers for use in industry in the areas of automation, manufacturing, and others. It will take an overall look at Programmable Logic Controllers while concentrating on data handling, function block diagram, and industrial networks and distributive control. State-of-the-art software used: MultiSim, LabView, Cosivis, Veep, Automation Studio, and RS Logix 500. It will also include: input/output ports, intermittent and continuous process control, arithmetic and comparison instruction, function block diagrams, indirect and indexed addressing, and sequential function charts. (Co-requisite: MF 350) One credit.

MF 351 Manufacturing Systems I

This introduction to general and special modern manufacturing technologies includes sheet metal fabrication and process, gear manufacturing, hard mold, powder metallurgy, plastic and rubber processes, primary metalworking processes, metal shearing and forming, welding, different machine processes, and material surface treatment. Additional topics include manufacturing techniques such as measurement and inspection for quality control process, material properties analysis in common materials and composites, and material selections and applications in modern manufacturing environments. (Prerequisite: MF 207) Three credits.

MF 352 Manufacturing Systems II

This course considers several advanced manufacturing technologies. Topics include laser cutting and welding; water-jet cutting and cleaning; plasma cutting and welding; analysis and application of numerical control, computerized numerical control, and programmable logic control systems in manufacturing facilities and modern production systems; robotics; automated assembly lines; and material handling systems. Advanced topics include management of modern automated production lines, design of material handling systems, and selection of control systems in manufacturing applications. (Prerequisite: MF 351) Three credits.

MF 353 Manufacturing Processes and Materials

This course will provide basic knowledge of conventional and non-conventional manufacturing processes, as well as the design, engineering, and economic properties of conventional and non-conventional materials. Topics to be considered are the influence of processing on materials and properties, and the role of process in design of products. Included are processes such as casting, forging, sheet metal fabrication, plastic forming, injection of plastic and metals, power metal joining, machining. (Prerequisite: MF 207) Three credits.

MF 354 Product and Process Design for Manufacturing

Students learn the principles of product design for optimizing product manufacture and assembly - an essential part of the concurrent engineering process. The course examines materials and processes used in part manufacture and designing for manual and automated assembly processes. A course project applies these principles. (Prerequisite: MF 240) Three credits.

MF 355 Product Planning Control and Forecasting

This course will consider modern operations of both manufacturing and service sectors of the world economy. Topics to be included are: concepts of planning and control of production systems; design of control systems and operation planning; demand forecasting; inventory control; operations planning; scheduling; dynamic control; production planning of product mixes; economical lot sizes and vendor supplies. Where possible computer models will be used. (Prerequisite: MF 354) Three credits.

MF 361 Automation and Robotics I

This course introduces the basic elements of automation, industrial robotics, automated work cells, common information model systems, and the automated factory. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, the classification of robots, automation sensors, work cells, import systems and programming, robot/system integration, economic justification, and applications. (Prerequisite: ME 203) Three credits.

MF 362 Automation and Robotics II

This course introduces components of the automated factory. Topics include design of parts and processes for automation, hard and flexible automation, blocks of automation, automatic production and assembly, numeric controllers, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, industrial logic control systems, programmable logic controllers, and computer applications in automation. (Prerequisite: ME 203) Three credits.

SW 131 Fundamentals of Programming

This course introduces object-oriented programming. Topics include data types, control structures, arrays, I/O, file handling, GUI, and the OOP concept of encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, packages, interfaces, and inner classes. Three credits.

SW 151 Introduction to Computer Game Modeling

This is an introductory computer games modeling course which examines the basics of computer game design and visual effects. Students will use graphics software modeling packages to create characters and visual effects, and to develop a computer game idea, including storyline and plots. Basic programming techniques may also be taught. Three credits.

SW 201 Software Engineering Methods

This course explores the requirements gathering, system analysis, and software design methods of software application following the software processes required for the production of high quality software.  Techniques for creating documentation and using software development tools will be presented.  Students will gain experience in software project management, requirements, analysis, and safety issues in software development; interpersonal skills for management and team membership; and the software engineering discernment of systems architecture. (Prerequisite: SW 232) Three credits.

SW 202 Software Design Methods

This course is the continuation of SW 201 with in-depth projects and further discussions of design and implementation topics. Through the use of case studies and project work that has the student gradually building a large design specification, students will achieve an understanding of how complex applications are designed and built. (Prerequisite: SW 201) Three credits.

SW 204 Software Project Management

This course explores and practices fundamental project management skills and life cycles required for both the successful management and development of software.  Quality management principles of Personal Software Process (PSP) and Team Software Process (TSP) are introduced and practiced.  Students will learn how to develop a project plan, scope a project, identify project activities, create work breakdown structures, estimate and schedule resources, construct and analyze project network diagrams, finalize project schedule and cost based on resource activity, recruit team members, organize and manage a project team, monitor and control progress, understand critical path project management, and have knowledge of both agile and traditional project management methods. (Prerequisite SW 232) Three credits.

SW 205 Software Testing and Maintenance

This course will cover in-depth methods for software testing, reliability and maintenance of software.  Students will learn the principles of software testing and how to apply software testing techniques to the development of quality software and how to deploy software systems, maintain, enhance and reuse software systems. (Prerequisite SW 201) Three credits.

SW 232 Advanced Programming and Data Structures

This course covers Abstract Data Structures such as Queues, Stacks, Heaps, Linked Lists, Trees, Graphs, Hash tables and sortings. Students apply data structure concept in advanced programming. (Prerequisite SW 131) Three credits.

SW 304 Web Development

This course introduces the student to developing applications for use on the World Wide Web. Students learn basic n-tier concepts for designing distributed applications and gain hands on experience through the construction of Web-based applications. The course covers concepts that allow communication over the Web. This includes designing and authoring Web pages, markup languages, the client-side document object model, usability, search engine optimization, and client-side dynamic Web pages. (Prerequisite: SW 131) Three credits.

SW 314 Network Concepts

This course covers the structure and technologies of computer network architecture including cabling, wiring hubs, file servers, bridges, routers, and network interface cards. It discusses network software and hardware configurations and demonstrates network concepts such as configuring protocol stacks and connecting a personal computer to a network. The course examines the OSI-model, TCP/IP protocol and routing protocols. Student will be able to do subnet of TCP/IP networks. Three credits.

SW 327 Operating Systems and Programming

This course introduces the internal operation of modern operating systems and students learn how to program on non-Window OS platform. The topics cover a brief history of operating systems, the major components of modern operating systems, and the object-oriented methodology on UNIX-like platform.  Various UNIX tools will be used in the course and participants study examples using object-oriented programs as well as large system integration by object-oriented methodology. (Prerequisite: SW 232) Three credits.

SW 348 Server Management

Server Management is a course designed to provide the student with the tools necessary to manage Window Server. The topics include user management, installation and configuration of web server, mail server, FTP server, LDAP and backup, and other routine system and network administration. Three credits.

SW 355 Database Management Systems

This course examines data formats, organizations, representations and structures; design and analysis of searching, sorting, and other algorithms; data management systems; relational database model; domains and relational integrity; structured query language; database design - logical and physical; entity-relationship diagrams; normalization; transaction processing; and database administration. (Prerequisite: SW 232) Three credits.

SW 382 Special Topics in Software Engineering

This course provides an in-depth study of selected topics in software engineering of particular interest to the students and instructor. The course is counted as a major elective/specialization course. The topics and prerequisites will be announced when this course is offered. Three credits.

SW 383 Independent Study

This course is an individualized study under the supervision of the faculty member. The course emphasizes individual creativity. Students work with a faculty mentor in studying and investigating topics of current interest in software engineering. Students may earn from one to three credits for an independent study course. (Prerequisite: permission of the instructor) One to three credits.

SW 399 Algorithms

This course introduces various algorithms and analyzes the complexity and efficiency of the algorithms. Topics cover classic and heuristic algorithms, algorithm analysis, searching, sorting and parsing techniques, and theoretical foundation. Student gains experience of analyzing algorithm efficiency and performance through problem solving and programming projects. (Prerequisite SW 232) Three credits.

SW 403 Visual C# for Programmers I

This course provides an introduction to programming using Visual C# and the .NET framework. Students learn to create applications using object-oriented programming and learn about Microsoft.NET, Visual Studio.NET, classes and objects, structured programming, exception handling, and debugging. Students complete this course understanding how Visual C# interacts with the .NET framework and will be able to build applications using Visual C#. The course is intended for designers and programmers who are developing systems in the Windows environment. Lab included. Three credits.

SW 404 Network Concepts

This course covers the structure and technologies of computer networks architecture including cabling, wiring hubs, file servers, bridges, routers, and network interface cards.  It discusses network software and hardware configurations protocol stacks and connecting a personal computer to a network.  The course examines the OSI-model, TCP/IP protocol, and routing protocols.  Students will be able to create a subnet of TCP/IP networks.  Three credits.

SW 408 Java for Programmers I

This programming course introduces Java fundamentals. Topics include the Java elements: objects, classes, data types, operators, control structures, and container data structures. The course views object-oriented programming as integral, teaching it throughout. Accordingly, it includes the concepts of encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, packages, interfaces, and inner classes. The course teaches screen design using graphical user interfaces and includes data handling concepts such as input from the keyboard, output to the screen, input from files and output to files. The course also introduces the concept of multi-threading in preparation for follow-up studies. Lab included. Three credits.

SW 409 Advanced Programming in Java

This course covers advanced topic of Java programming. Topic covers multithreading, networking, nested references, design patterns, JDBC, persistence, I/O and advanced GUI such as swing. Data structure concepts such as linked list, tree and basic searching and sorting algorithms will be covered. Lab included. (Prerequisite: SW 232 or permission of the instructor) Three credits.

SW 410 Enterprise Java

This course explores advanced Java technologies. Coverage includes state-of-the-art explorations into server-side technologies such as JDBC, Hibernate, Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB), Java Message Service (JMS), XML, etc., as time permits. Lab included. (Prerequisite: SW 409 or permission of the instructor).  Three credits.

SW 505 Advanced Database Concepts

This course covers topics in database implementation designed to provide software engineers with a wide variety of server-side problem solving techniques. Topics include cursors, query and index optimization, advanced SQL programming, distributed databases, object-oriented databases, clustering, partitioning, and working with XML and other unstructured data. While Microsoft SQL Server is primarily used for demonstration, the topics covered are applicable to any database platform, and the different approaches of the major database vendors are frequently contrasted. Format consists of lecture and lab. (Prerequisites: SW 232 plus SW 355 or instructor approval) Three credits.

SW 506 Advanced Programming in C#

This course teaches application developers the more advanced elements of programming with Visual C# for the .NET framework. Students learn object-oriented programming using classes, objects and inheritance, and cover topics such as multithreading, design patterns, and advanced GUI. Data structure concepts such as linked list, tree and basic searching and sorting algorithms will be covered. At the completion of this course, students will be able to produce complete Windows and console based applications with Visual C#. Lab included. (Prerequisite: SW 232) Three credits.

SW 508 Data Warehouse Systems

This course examines the tools, techniques, and processes used in the design and development of data warehouses. Students will examine how to successfully gather, structure, analyze, and understand the data to be stored in the data warehouse, discuss techniques for modeling the data in the data warehouse, discuss the ETL process and describe techniques for presenting and analyzing the data in the warehouse. Capacity planning and performance monitoring will be discussed. Microsoft Analysis Services and Sybase ASIQ will be examined as approaches for implementing a data warehouse. (Prerequisite: SW 355) Three credits.

SW 512 Web Development II with ASP.NET

This course teaches site developers how to create a robust, scalable and data-driven ASP.NET website. Students learn how to create ASP.NET applications using a text editor and the command-line tools, as well as using Visual Studio. Topics include the .NET framework, web forms, validation controls, database connectivity, web services, component development, user controls, custom server controls, and best practices. At the end of the course, students are able to describe the issues involved in creating an enterprise website, creating and publishing a website, creating interactive content for a website, adding server scripting to a web page using ASP.NET, implementing security in a website, and reading and writing information to a database from ASP.NET. (Prerequisites: SW 406 plus SW 506 or permission of instructor) Three credits.

SW 516 High Performance Database Web Application

This course is an introduction to the PHP programming language. Topics include installation and configuration with the Apache http server, variables and data types, language syntax, control structures, functions, strategies and tools for handling input and generating output, error handling, sending e-mail, manipulating dates and times, string manipulation and regular expressions, and SQL and MySQL database access. The course also covers advanced topics such as MVC model-based web application development using framework and packages from the PHP Extension and Application Repository (PEAR). At the conclusion of the course, students are able to design and implement scalable data-driven web applications. (Prerequisites: SW 304 and SW 232) Three credits.

SW 518 Data Mining and Business Intelligence

This course examines business intelligence concepts, methods and processes used to improve data-centric business decisions and support solutions with a particular focus on data mining techniques. Students will first examine the principles and practices of gathering and retrieving large volumes of data for analysis and synthesis. Next, analytical techniques for extracting information from large data sets will be examined. In particular, the data mining techniques of classification, estimation, prediction, and clustering will be examined. During the course, knowledge management will also be reviewed, and how organizations manage and use the knowledge that they acquire. Data presentation will be discussed. Three credits.

SW 530 Introduction to Information Security

This course gives students a fundamental understanding of current social engineering methods in the Information Security arena. Deception and human behavior is exploited to gain valuable information, which is very relevant to today's growing security concerns. This course builds upon the weaknesses in the human factor. Areas of discussion will be methods, current trends, and most of all countermeasures. The pedigree will be lecture and discussions assignment, which involves analyzing current workplaces and social gatherings coupled with scenarios of exploitation. Three credits.

SW 531 Application and Data Security

This course is structured around enterprise and web applications and the data security associated with these applications.  It encompasses the encryption schemes of transmission to execution of code and complete flight of an execution.  Common countermeasure and best business practices that help ensure a solid security understanding are the objectives of the course.  Three credits.

SW 535 Web Application Security

This course is structured around Internet transactions and data associated with these transactions. It encompasses encryption schemes of transmission to execution of code and complete flight of an execution. Web-based technologies are the main focus, along with general understanding of underlying web infrastructure and discussing common exploits. Common countermeasure and best business practices that help ensure a solid security understanding are the objective of the course. Three credits.

SW 550 and SW 551 Capstone Professional Project I and II

In these two semester capstone courses, students form teams, perform a technical study, and design software systems based on either their customer's requirements, develop, test, and deploy software systems. The results of these projects provide a library of case studies, designs, and software development techniques, and project management skills that are of general interest to local information technology professionals. A capstone prospectus, approved by your advisor, must be submitted to and accepted by the director of the program prior to starting the capstone sequence. (Prerequisites: SW 401 and completion of 18 credits MSSE courses at the minimum.) Six credits for the two-course sequence.

SW 596 Network Routing and Switching

The course presents concepts and develops skills needed in designing, implementing, and troubleshooting local and wide-area networks. Students design and configure LAN, WAN using routers/switches and learn the components of wireless networks, and how to configure and troubleshoot a network and optimize its performance. The course provides also numerous lab opportunities to configure and troubleshoot networks with Cisco routers and switches (Prerequisite: SW 404) Elective. Three credits.

SW 599 Information Security Measures and Countermeasures

This course covers current information security practices and countermeasures put in place to safeguard against security breaches. The course reviews Internet infrastructures such as firewalls, IDS systems, and honey pots. Additional areas include risk analysis, computer-use policies, physical security, Internet/intranet security, Malware, firewall infrastructure, and current information security issues. (Prerequisite: SW 404) Three credits.